Carmen Salsbury
Carmen Salsbury
Professor – Biological Science

Carmen Salsbury is a Professor of Biological Sciences with expertise in the areas of behavioral and physiological ecology. Mammals have served as Dr. Salsbury’s primary study subjects over the years and she has a specific interest in the ecology of squirrels, both tree and ground-dwelling species. Dr. Salsbury has worked on the reproductive behavior and physiology of yellow-bellied marmots and on patterns of hibernation in woodchucks. Most recently, she has become more interested in urban ecological questions.  Dr, Salsbury has conducted studies in collaboration with students and Dr. Travis Ryan addressing patterns of distribution and abundance of tree squirrels within the urban/suburban landscape.  Dr. Salsbury current focus is to examine distributions of urban wildlife of all kinds throughout the city of Indianapolis.  She is working in collaboration with Drs. Travis Ryan and Julia Angstmann on a study, Indy Wildlife Watch, that involves a large-scale deployment of camera traps along transects throughout the city of Indianapolis to monitor the occurrence and movement of various species living within the city and the surrounding rural areas. 

Dr. Salsbury’s  teaching interests are varied although the central focus of all of her courses is evolutionary ecology.  Dr. Salsbury teaches an introductory course in the biology major curriculum (BI 230 Ecology and Evolutionary Biology – Fundamentals), Mammalogy (BI 306), Zoology (BI 301), Vertebrate Biology (BI 307), Tropical Field Biology (BI 308), Advanced Evolutionary Biology (BI 423), and seminar courses in behavioral ecology.  Currently, Dr. Salsbury is the Director of the Science, Technology and Environmental Studies interdisciplinary program. She directs both the Science, Technology and Society major as well as the Environmental Studies major. 



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Julia Angstmann
Julia Angstmann
Director of the Center for Urban Ecology at Butler

I am a research ecologist specializing in plant physiological ecology and ecosystem ecology seeking to connect human impacts of land alteration, pollution, and manmade infrastructure on ecosystem function, plant physiological response, and species diversity. I have a PhD in Ecology with a Minor in Statistics from the University of Wyoming and completed a postdoc at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. In South Africa, I transitioned into urban ecology while studying the impacts of air pollution and subsequent deposition of pollutants on plant diversity in the urban ecosystem. 

After 3-years at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) as a Proposal Writer and Editor, I began my role as the Director of the Center for Urban Ecology and Sustainability at Butler University. In this role, I am responsible for the oversight of the CUES programs such as the CUE Farm and student internships as well as assisting faculty and community partners with research, education, and community outreach activities that focus on urban ecology and sustainability. I currently serve on the Ecology Committee of Reconnecting to Our Waterways and on the Advisory Team for the Purdue Extension Farm Incubator project in Indianapolis.

For more information on what the CUES does and how to get involved, check out our website at: https://www.butler.edu/cues.

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Krista Cline
Krista Cline
Associate Professor – Sociology

I am Associate Professor of Sociology and Criminology at Butler University. Before coming to Butler, I earned a dual-title Ph.D. from Purdue University in sociology and gerontology. I then spent at year at the University of Missouri as a postdoctoral scholar in the Research Center for Human Animal Interactions. 

My research interests include the roles of women and mothers, health and body weight issues, and social psychology. I teach a variety of courses including;  families, international crime, gender, race, and crime, health and society, aging and the life course, and gender and society.

My research is currently funded by the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS). This research examines mothers’ perspectives of the benefits of interscholastic activities of their high school students. This is a 10 year longitudinal study that begin in the fall of 2019. I also host the podcast, MOMent with Mom, with members of the NFHS. 


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Elizabeth Davis
Elizabeth Davis
Senior Lecturer, Chemistry & Biochemistry

Education
Ph.D., Environment (area of specialization: environmental chemistry), Duke University.
B.A., Chemistry, St.Mary’s College of Maryland.

Professional Experience
2014 – present: Lecturer, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Butler University.
2014 – present: Affiliate Faculty, Science, Technology, and Environmental Studies program, Butler University. 
2018 – present: Area Coordinator for Natural World core requirement, Butler University.
2013-2014: Postdoctoral scholar, Medical University of South Carolina.

Courses Taught
CH105 and CH106 – General Chemistry
CH107 – Advanced General Chemistry
CH321 – Analytical Chemistry
CH425 – Environmental Chemistry
CH418 – Chemical Issues in the Global Modern World
ENV300 – Environmental Science and Human Health
NW210 – Chemistry and Society

Elise Edwards
Elise Edwards
Professor – Anthropology

My research interests include the history and culture of Japan, the anthropology of sport, the anthropology of science, gender studies, feminist theory, historical anthropology, mass/popular culture, theories of embodiment, urban anthropology, and visual culture. Most of my fieldwork has focused on cultures of sport in Japan and while I study and teach about all kinds of sport, football (soccer) is my ultimate passion. I am currently working to complete a book manuscript about soccer, corporate sport, the recession of the 1990s, and national identity in Japan, which is tentatively titled Fields for the Future: Soccer and Citizens in Japan at the Turn of the 21st Century. More locally, I’ve become interested in the issue of homelessness, particularly here in my hometown of Indianapolis, and hope to create a course and a research project focused on homeless individuals and their lives. 

 Here is a link to my webpage.

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Stuart Glennan
Stuart Glennan
Professor – Philosophy

Stuart Glennan is the Harry T. Ice Professor of Philosophy and Associate Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. He received his BA in mathematics and philosophy from Yale University,and his MA and PhD in philosophy from the University of Chicago before coming to Butler in 1992.  He was the founding director of Butler’s Science, Technology Environmental Studies Program, a still serves on the program steering committee.    He also has served as chair of Butler’s Department of Philosophy, Religion and Classics.  He helped develop and teaches in Butler’s Neuroscience Minor. 

Professor Glennan’s area of specialization is in the philosophy of science, with particular attention to biology and psychology.  He has written about causation, explanation and model building. He is chiefly known for his work on the nature of mechanisms and the role of mechanistic models and explanations across the sciences.  He is author of The New Mechanical Philosophy (Oxford University Press, 2017) and editor, with Phyllis Illari, of the Routledge Handbook of Mechanisms and Mechanical Philosophy (2018).  He has also written on the topic of religion and science, and science education, and has dabbled in the philosophy of history.  Links to publications can be found on Butler’s archive and at Google scholar.

Professor Glennan regularly teaches courses in philosophy of science, philosophy of mind, philosophy of biology and logic.  (He is the author, with Joe Bessie, of the textbook Elements of Deductive Inference.  He also takes pleasure in teaching lower level courses, and has taught courses in the first year seminar that integrate philosophical, literary, and religious texts.

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Claudia Johnson
Claudia Johnson
Admin Spec – Philosophy, Religion & Environmental Studies
James McGrath
James McGrath
Professor – Religion

James F. McGrath is Clarence L. Goodwin Chair in New Testament Language and Literature. His PhD from the University of Durham became the basis for his first book, John’s Apologetic Christology, published by Cambridge University Press in the SNTS Monograph Series. He has also written a "prequel" about the broader context of monotheism and Christology in ancient Judaism and Christianity, The Only True God: Early Christian Monotheism in Its Jewish Context, published by University of Illinois Press. More recently he has published What Jesus Learned from Women which explores the topic of the historical figure of Jesus and the influence the women mentioned in the Gospels had on him.

In addition to his work on the New Testament and early Christianity, Dr. McGrath also researches the Mandaeans (the last surviving Gnostic group from the ancient world) and their literature. The two-volume critical edition, translation, and commentary on the Mandaean Book of John (which he produced together with Charles Haberl of Rutgers University) represents the first such academic edition of the complete work in English based on all known manuscripts. Another area of specialty is the intersection of religion and science fiction. On that subject, he is the author of Theology and Science Fiction and The Battle of Ranskoor av Kolos (Black Archive #52), editor of Religion and Science Fiction and co-editor of Time and Relative Dimensions in Faith: Religion and Doctor Who. He blogs at ReligionProf

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Katherine Novak
Katherine Novak
Professor – Sociology

Dr. Katherine (Kate) Novak is a professor in the Department of Sociology and Criminology where she teaches courses in criminology, mental illness, social psychology, research methods and statistics. She holds a B.A  in sociology and in psychology, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in sociology, with a concentration in criminology, and a Ph.D. minor in Criminal Justice from Indiana University-Bloomington. 

Much of Dr. Novak’s current research focuses on adolescent and college student substance use and delinquency and has been published in academic journals such as Crime & Delinquency, Addictive Behaviors, Journal of Criminal Justice, Sociological Inquiry, Journal of Social Psychology, The Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse, The Journal of Family Issues, The Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education, and The Journal of Primary Prevention. She is the co-author of two textbooks- Individual and Society:  Sociological Social Psychology (with Lizabeth A. Crawford) and Applied Communication Research (with Judith M. Buddenbaum).  Additionally, Dr. Novak has collaborated with other faculty on research projects focusing on homelessness in Indianapolis, perceptions of crime and safety in the local community, immigrants’ perceptions of prejudice and discrimination, faculty work-load satisfaction, and student learning in a topically-focused introductory sociology course. She has published several class assignments and activities in TRAILS: Teaching Resources and Innovations Library for Sociology and serves on the advisory board for the Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. Dr. Novak regularly mentors students, supervising internships and directed research projects, and serving as the faculty advisor for department and university honors theses. Her students have presented their research at college and sociology conferences and to organizational leaders and administrators and have published papers in peer-reviewed research journals. 

Dr. Novak has received many internal grants for both research and teaching, and she has won a number of university awards.  She received the Liberal Arts and Sciences Outstanding Faculty Award for Teaching Excellence in 2016 and the Liberal Arts and Sciences Outstanding Faculty Award in 2010 and 2003.


Recent Publications:

Crawford, Lizabeth A. and Novak, Katherine B.  2013.  Individual and Society: Sociological Social Psychology. Routledge/Taylor& Francis. [2nd edition released March 2018]  https://www.routledge.com/Individual-and-Society-Sociological-Social-Psychology-2nd-Edition/Crawford-Novak/p/book/9781138284692

Kowalski, Jennifer R., Lineweaver, Tara L., and Novak, Katherine B.  2021.  “Developing Integrative Thinking in Undergraduate Students through an Interdisciplinary General Education Course on Mental Illness.”  College Teaching.  https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/87567555.2021.1982856\

Crawford, Lizabeth A. and Novak, Katherine, B.  2020.  "College Student Activities, Social Capital, and Drinking Behavior."  Journal of Alcohol and Drug Eductation 64(1):9-32.

Crawford, Lizabeth A, Novak, Katherine B, and Rasitha R.Jayasekare.  2019. “Volunteerism, Alcohol Beliefs, and First-Year College Students’ Drinking Behaviors: Implications for Prevention.”  The Journal of Primary Prevention. Advanced On-line Publication.  https://link.springer.com/epdf/10.1007/s10935-019-00558-z?author_access_token=VsSE7FJJx4odI99TFRd2z_e4RwlQNchNByi7wbcMAY5U0p0vLjEfjXTWGPJg3fnUs7hDFpqWDQBu-3S9HNrZBdSXHQeiJNHtTScfiJScXxZnrFgi8YqhWDnMn4l9SXYNcCZl9aE9GpZQl-UpIAGxcA%3D%3D

Crawford, Lizabeth A. and Novak, Katherine B.  2018. “Being with Friends and the Potential for Binge Drinking During the First College Semester.”  Journal of the First-Year Experience & Students in Transition 30(2):79-96.

Crawford, Lizabeth A., Novak, Katherine B., and Foston, Amia K. 2016 (online)/ 2018 (print).“Routine Activities and Delinquency: The Significance of Bonds to Society and Peer Context.”  Crime & Delinquency 64(4):472-509.

Howard, Jay R., Novak, Katherine B., Scott, Marvin B. and Cline, Krista M.C.  2014. “Another Nibble at the Core: Student Learning in a Topically-Focused Introductory Sociology Course.”  Teaching Sociology 42(3):177-186.

Crawford, Lizabeth A. and Novak, Katherine B.  2013. “The Effects of Public Self-Consciousness and Embarrassability on College Student Drinking: Evidence in Support of a Protective Self-Presentational Model.”  The Journal of Social Psychology 153(1):109-122.

Crawford, Lizabeth A. and Novak, Katherine B.  2011.  “Beliefs about Alcohol and the College Experience, Locus of Self, and College Undergraduates’ Drinking Patterns.”  Sociological Inquiry 81(4):477-494.

Crawford, Lizabeth A., and Novak, Katherine B.  2010. “Beliefs about Alcohol and the College Experience as Moderators of the Effects of Perceived Campus Drinking Norms on Levels of Alcohol Use among College Undergraduates. Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education. 54(3):69-96.

Novak, Katherine B.and Crawford, L. A.  2010.  “Routine Activities as Determinants of Gender Differences in Delinquency. Journal of Criminal Justice 38(5):913-920.

Menendez-Alarcon, Antonio V. and Novak, Katherine B.  2010. “Latin American Immigrants in Indianapolis: Perceptions of Prejudice and Discrimination.”  Latino Studies. 8:93-120.

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Thomas Paradis
Thomas Paradis
Professor – History

Biography

Born and raised in northern Connecticut, Thomas (Tom) Paradis obtained his Bachelor’s degree in Geography at the Pennsylvania State University (1992), and his Masters (1994) and Ph.D. (1997) degrees in Geography: Urban & Rural Development from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He continued moving west to Flagstaff, Arizona in 1997 as faculty at Northern Arizona University (NAU), where he was recognized in 2011 and 2014 as a President’s Distinguished Teaching Fellow. He further served as the Chair of the Department of Geography, Planning & Recreation and as the university’s Director of Academic Assessment. As a professor of geography and community planning here at Butler, he is also an affiliate faculty member in Butler’s Science, Technology & Environmental Studies (STES) program. Having originally majored in meteorology at Penn State, he ended up teaching weather and climate at the U. of Illinois and later at NAU. He has thus recently developed a new course at Butler for the Natural Worlds block of the Core Curriculum called Weather, Climate & Society (NW 265). Beyond the fun of academics, Tom enjoys traveling, photography, railroad history and modeling, playing basketball, and was once an avid trumpet player in high school and the Penn State Blue Band (Go State!). 

Teaching and Scholarship

Tom’s areas of teaching and research encompass the topics of urban and cultural geography, downtown redevelopment, historic preservation, urban design, heritage tourism, Italy, the American Southwest, and the scholarship of teaching and learning. Having led several study-abroad programs in Viterbo and Siena, Italy to explore livable cities and walkable design, Tom is the author of several books, including Living the Palio: A Story of Community and Public Life in Siena, Italy (3rd edition 2020), and the Illustrated Encyclopedia of American Landmarks (2012), among earlier works. His recent follow-up book is Unbridled Spirit: The Untold Story of the 2018 Extraordinary Palio in Siena, Italy (Feb. 2020). He is now turning his sights to Singapore as he investigates the history of tourism development and tourist spaces there. 

Happy Hunger Games!

He also offers a creative First-Year Seminar (FYS) course focused on Unpacking the Hunger Games, an interdisciplinary approach to understanding our world through Suzanne Collins’ dystopian series. His latest book (fall, 2021) is A Place Called District 12: Appalachian Geography and Music in the Hunger Games (McFarland Press). 

Current and Upcoming Butler Courses

  • FYS 101: Unpacking the Hunger Games, Part 1 (every fall)
  • NW 265-ENV: Weather, Climate & Society (every fall, summer 2022)
  • ENV 315 (STES Program): Designing for Livable Cities (fall 2021)
  • FYS 102: Unpacking the Hunger Games, Part 2 (every spring)
  • HST 305 (Topics Course): American Architecture and Preservation (spring 2022)
  • HST 347: U.S. Urban History (spring 2022)
  • HST 346: American Historical Geography (spring 2023)

Carol Reeves
Carol Reeves
Professor – English

Carol Reeves, Rebecca Clifton Reade Professor of English,came to Butler from Texas in 1989 after receiving her Ph.D. from TexasChristian University.

Professor Reeves investigates how language and rhetoric shapeour knowledge and understanding of our world, ourselves, and others.  In particular, she examines how language bothenables and disables the growth of knowledge and consensus surroundingscientific claims, both inside science and in the public.  Her publications on the AIDS epidemic, MadCow Disease or Prion Disease, agricultural chemicals, addiction, and climatechange all demonstrate the tenuous relation between “reality” and the languagewe use to represent that reality.  Bias,context, and limited data inevitably lead to imperfect definitions,descriptions, labels, and visuals representations that can easily come to“stand in” for an unexplored or unknown totality.  She also explores the struggles scientistsface when they attempt to describe and establish new phenomena, engage incross-disciplinary debates over the nature of a phenomenon, when they areentrenched in high stakes disagreements over threats to the environment andhuman health, when they need to communicate risk to the general public, andwhen they want to change perceptions of stigmatized conditions. 

Professor Reeves’ teaching fields include courses in MedicalHumanities, Political Rhetoric, Scientific Rhetoric, Professional Writing abouthealth and the environment, and Literature.  

Professor Reeves has also made contributions to severalorganizations in Indianapolis and Indiana that have provided opportunities forher students.  Working with CAFO Watch,Indiana to increase regulatory oversight for Concentrated Animal FeedingOperations, Reeves has brought many students into the organization as internswho learn about the legislative process and environmental policymaking.  She and students worked with the RileyHospital Ryan White Pediatric Infectious Disease department to plan a campaignto create awareness of pre- and peri-natal HIV transmission and the importanceof testing.  She and her students alsowork with Women for Change Indianapolis and Planned Parenthood to help buildopportunities for women to access educational opportunities and healthcare and tocombat discrimination. 

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Travis Ryan
Travis Ryan
Associate Provost/Professor

Travis Ryan is a Professor of Biological Sciences with expertise in urban ecology and conservation biology, and he is one of the founding faculty of the Center for Urban Ecology at Butler University. He teaches an introductory course in the biology major curriculum (BI 230 Ecology and Evolutionary Biology – Fundamentals), organizes the sophomore seminar (BI 299 – Biology Seminar), and teaches upper level electives in Advanced Ecology (BI 418) and Conservation Biology (BI 419). Dr. Ryan also collaborates with Dr. Phil Villani to offer Tropical Terrestrial Biology (BI 417), an intensive field course taught over the course of two weeks in Panama, every other summer. Dr. Ryan’s past research focused on the conservation of amphibians and reptiles, evolutionary ecology of amphibians and the evolution of life histories, and the ecology of turtle assemblages and the spatial ecology of turtles within urban aquatic habitats. Working with colleagues Drs. Carmen Salsbury and Julia Angstmann, he helps run Indy Wildlife Watch (Instagram: @indywildwatch), which documents the density, diversity, and distribution of of wildlife throughout the greater Indianapolis region. This is part of a nationwide research project, the Urban Wildlife Information Network. He is the author of more than 40 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters, is a former Associate Editor of the Journal of Herpetology, and is a member of the Board of Editors for Urban Naturalist. Dr. Ryan served as chair of the Department of Biological Sciences (2013-2019), was twice elected vice chair of Faculty Senate (2016-2020), and was the faculty director of the Core Curriculum (2020-2021). He was appointed Associate Provost beginning July 2021.

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Kristin Swenson
Kristin Swenson
Professor – Communication & Media Studies
Robin Turner
Robin Turner
Associate Professor – Political Science

Robin L. Turner is an Associate Professor of Political Science, Chair of the Department of Political Science, and Director of the Peace and Conflict Studies Program at Butler University in the USA and an honorary research associate of the Society, Work, and Politics Institute at the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa. Dr. Turner served as the founding director of the Social Justice and Diversity Butler University Core Curriculum requirement from 2017 to 2019.  She earned a master’s degree and doctorate in political science at the University of California, Berkeley and a masters degree in social science (African politics) from the University of Cape Town (South Africa). Her research, writing, and teaching span multiple fields, including political science, gender studies, African studies, development studies, tourism studies, political ecology, and geography.


Dr. Turner’s research focuses principally on how public policies shape rural political economies, influence identities, and affect people’s behavior in southern Africa. She uses interviews, ethnography, and archival research to examine the interplay between state policies and local practices over time and to look closely at how past and present ways of structuring property and authority shape local political economies and influence constructions of identity. She has published on topics ranging from the politics of tradition; dispossession, property, and nature tourism; and field research to decolonial pedagogy.


Dr. Turner teaches courses that help students better understand the perspectives, experiences, and political strategies of historically marginalized people in Africa, the United States, and elsewhere in the world. Her courses contribute to the political science major and minor, to the core curriculum, and to several interdisciplinary programs She led the the development of a new Global and Historical Studies course centered on the question, "What is Freedom," with grant support from the National Endowment for the Humanities,  Her recent course offerings include:


  • PO 151 Introduction to Comparative Politics
  • PO 350-SAC African Politics
  • PO 351-SJD Politics of Gender & Sexuality in Africa
  • PO 352 Comparative Political Economy
  • PO 354-SJD Environmental Justice
  • PO 490 Senior Seminar on Women and Politics across the World
  • PO 490 Senior Seminar on Political Economy
  • GHS 206-SJD Resistance and Reaction: Resistance and Reaction: Colonialism and Post-Colonialism in Africa
  • GHS 210-SJD Freedom and Movement in the Transatlantic World

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Jesse Van Gerven
Jesse Van Gerven
Associate Professor – STES