Department Chair
Panos Linos
Panos Linos
Professor – Computer Science

Panos Linos is a professor of Computer Science and Software Engineering at Butler University since 2000. He served as the interim department chairperson during the fall 2019 semester. Following that, he has accepted the challenge to serve another 3-year term as a chairperson during the COVID-19 pandemic. Before joining Butler, he was the chairperson of the Computer Science department at Tennessee Technological University. Dr. Linos has more than 30 years of academic and consulting experience. He enjoys teaching online and in-person courses on topics such as Software Engineering, Machine Learning, Agile Software Development and Mobile App Development. He teaches and manages the EPICS program at Butler, where he supervises student teams developing software for nonprofit organizations. His on-going research activities focus on developing innovative tools and techniques to facilitate the modernization of legacy software systems. He is a former or current consultant to various organizations including the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Kaman Sciences Corporation, PLTW (Project Lead The Way) and Sallie Mae where he has been engaged in various projects including cloud migration strategies of industrial-strength software systems. He received M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science and Software Engineering from Wayne State University.

Faculty and Staff
Christopher Braun
Future Faculty Teaching Fellow – Eugene S. Pulliam School of Journalism
Michael Burroughs
Michael Burroughs
Adjunct – LAS Comp Sci

Mike Burroughs is an experienced software professional with over 25 years of experience developing commercial software. He has held positions at some of the Indianapolis areas most exciting startup companies including Software Artistry, eSkye Solutions, Double-Take Software, Autobase, ChaCha, and SalesVue. His primary focus has always been database technologies and he is currently consulting with a number of companies as a data scientist.  

His primary technical focus these days is scalable applications with big data components. He is spending much of his time these days working on cloud-based micro-service architectures sitting atop MongoDB. He is also working with applying natural language and artificial intelligence techniques to common business application domains.

He started teaching as an adjunct professor at Butler University in the fall of 2012. He teaches the Intro Database course as well as an Topics course in Big Data. He is also teaching Introduction to Computer Science. Prior to teaching at Butler, Mike held similar adjunct positions at IUPUI and University of Indianapolis.


Zhihong Chen
Zhihong Chen
Professor – Computer Science

Zhihong Chen is a professor of Computer Science and Software Engineering at Butler University. He earned a bachelor’s degree in 1982 and a master degree in 1985, both are in Mathematics from South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, P R. China. He came to the U.S. in 1985 to work for his Ph.D. degree. He received his Ph.D. in Mathematics as well as two more master degrees, one in Computer Science and one in Mathematics from Wayne State University, Michigan. His primary research area is in Graph theory. Besides his over 30 years’ experience in academia, he has also worked on a CAD software (Computer Aid Design) used by auto companies and software for pollution analysis funded by the Department of Energy.  His research publication can be found at: https://blue.butler.edu/~chen/ChenPaper.htm



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Jeremy Eglen
Jeremy Eglen
Adjunct – LAS Comp Sci
Ankur Gupta
Ankur Gupta
Professor – Computer Science

Ankur Gupta is a Professor of Computer Science and Software Engineering at Butler University. Dr. Gupta completed his undergraduate work and a master’s degree in computer science at the University of Texas at Dallas. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Duke University. Dr. Gupta’s research area focuses on the design of algorithms that compress large volumes of data, while simultaneously making them searchable (think Google search or Big Data). Dr. Gupta has also pursued unique research on Artificial Wisdom, in other words, trying to discover the meaning of “wisdom” from a computational point of view. This work was funded by the John Templeton Foundation.

Carrie Rector
Carrie Rector
Lecturer – Eugene S. Pulliam School of Journalism and Creative Media
Ryan Rybarczyk
Ryan Rybarczyk
Assistant Professor, Computer Science

Welcome!

I am a 2007 graduate (B.S.) of the Computer Science & Software Engineering program. Upon graduation, I worked for 2+ years as a software engineer at Sallie Mae, Inc. in Fishers, IN. This was an excellent position but I felt a calling in a different direction and during this time I decided to pursue graduate studies. In 2010, I earned an M.S. in Computer Science from Purdue University (Indianapolis) and in 2015 earned a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Purdue University (Indianapolis) under the guidance of Dr. Rajeev R. Raje. I have a strong passion for education and want to see each and every student succeed! My areas of teaching interest include: CS1 – Introduction to Computer Programming (CS 142), Software Engineering (SE 461, SE 462, and SE 463), CS2 – Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures in Java, Advanced Data Structures in C++ (CS 341), Distributed Computing, and Programming Languages (CS 441).

My research interest is in the area of Computer Science Education with additional interests, and ongoing work, in the fields of Software Engineering as well as Distributed Computing. In particular, I am currently focused on examining the impact of programming language selection and its relationship with natural language learning for CS1 and CS2 courses. A sub-topic in this area is the impact of peer code reviews on programming fluency during this learning process. I am also interested in exploring the relationship between socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds with respect to their inclusion and participation in STEM fields – particularly Computer Science. I have also published work in the area of sensor subset selection with a focus on the analysis of trust and reliability as selection criteria for the service selection process. This particular project, eDOTS, involves using inexpensive sensing devices (smart phones, web cameras, Wi-Fi access points, etc.) to accurately locate the position of an object in an indoor environment. I am always willing and open to explore new ideas in these areas and welcome any student wishing to explore any topic further. My publications are listed and maintained on my personal website, you may also find them on Google Scholar.

For my semester teaching schedule and more information you can visit my website: https://blue.butler.edu/~rrybarcz/

Go Dawgs!

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Jon Sligh
Jon Sligh
Adjunct – LAS Comp Sci
Jonathan Sorenson
Jonathan Sorenson
Professor – Computer Science

Links

Teaching

I have been teaching computer science (and in the past, some mathematics) at Butler since 1991.  Courses I commonly teach include CS142 Intro to Programming and Computer Science (in C++), CS248 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures in Java, CS321 Computer Organization, and CS458 Cryptography.  In the past, I have also taught discrete math, operating systems, compiler design, EPICS, algorithms, databases, computer ethics, parallel algorithms, and even modern algebra.  I also teach a course on Alan Turing in the university honors program from time to time. 

Research

My research interest is in algorithms for problems from number theory.  In particular, I’m interested in algorithms for computing greatest common divisors, for listing and detecting prime numbers, and for factoring large integers.  I often use Big Dawg, Butler’s cluster supercomputer, in my work.  I’ve published several papers with former Butler students. 

I studied computer science and mathematics as an undergraduate at Valparaiso University, and as a graduate student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  Eric Bach was my thesis advisor.

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