Department Chair
Vivian Deno
Vivian Deno

Background


Research


Teaching

Fall 2022

MW 1-2:15 HST 305 Vexing Women: Transnational Feminist Histories and Struggles, 1870-1940

MW 2:30-3:40 American Visions

Spring 2022

MW 1-2:15 American Visions

T/TH 1-2:15 Formation of Modern America

Fall 2021

MW 1-2:15 HST 342 US Workingwomen in the Modern City, 1870-1940

T Dolly Parton’s America: Gender, Region, & Culture

  • Check out our Spotify playlist for our course read, Sarah Smarsh, She Come By It Natural: Dolly Parton and the Women Who Lived Her Songs (2020)


Faculty & Staff
Amy Arnold
Amy Arnold
Office and Student Personnel Services Administrator

Amy joined Butler University in November 2015 as the Administrative Specialist for the History, Anthropology, & Classics Department. During that time she received a Master’s Degree in Effective Teaching and Leadership from the College of Education where she completed a thesis researching university staff’s need for professional development. In July 2022, she returned to the College of Education as the Office and Student Personnel Services Administrator, leading staff and managing external placements for COE students. She also teaches a course for the Physical Well Being (PWB) area of the University’s Core Curriculum called Mindfulness in Everyday Life. Her contemplative training is based in Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR), Interpersonal Mindfulness, and is a certified Koru Mindfulness teacher. She likes t create conditions where people are seen, valued, and respected for their whole self. 

Christopher Bungard
Christopher Bungard
Professor – Classical Studies

Biography

Dr. Bungard hails from the Buckeye State, having earned a BA from Denison University in Granville, Ohio before moving westwards down I-70 to Ohio State University where he earned both an MA and a PhD. He has continued his travel westwards down I-70, landing here at Butler University, where he has taught since 2008.

Areas of Research

Dr. Bungard’s research looks broadly at humor and theatre from the ancient world. He has published on laughter in the Homeric Hymn to Hermes as well as several articles in English and Italian on the role of clever slaves in the comedies of the 2nd century BCE playwright Plautus. He is also interested in the ways that ancient theatre continues to speak to the modern world whether in the classroom or the enduring themes of Medea’s story, connecting her experience with music in the modern world. 

Dr. Bungard has also turned his hand to translating various plays of Plautus. His translation of Truculentus has been performed by an all-female cast at Butler as well as an international cast in Toronto.

Dr. Bungard’s interest in humor stems from humor’s ability to encourage us to think about gaps in a world that we may think is perfectly whole. Humor exposes our values and prejudices, and it allows us to find alternatives when discussions founder along the lines of beliefs that may seem ‘natural’ and ‘normal’.

Teaching Assignments

Dr. Bungard teaches intermediate and advanced Latin courses on authors as broad ranging as Caesar, Vergil, Seneca, and Plautus. He also teaches upper level courses in translation on Ancient Drama, Ancient Law, and Epic Poetry. A grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, led him to teach a First Year Seminar entitled "Why Is It Funny?".

In addition, Dr. Bungard regularly takes students to Rome and the Bay of Naples for summer study courses on Roman literature, exploring the intersections of texts and physical sites. As part of this course, students develop short digital stories imagining what it would have been like to live near Mt. Vesuvius on the fateful day of the eruption in 79 CE.

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John Cornell
John Cornell
Associate Professor – History

I teach modern European history, including "The Enlightenment and Romanticism," "Modern Germany," "Back in the USSR,"and "20th-Century Europe  I also offer courses  in Butler’s core program Global and Historical Studies, including Africa, the Caribbean, and Modern Middle East.  Recent specialty topics include "History and Fiction," "The History of Children and Youth," and "Walls."

Elise Edwards
Elise Edwards
Professor – Anthropology

My research interests include the history and culture of Japan, the anthropology of sport, the anthropology of science, gender studies, feminist theory, historical anthropology, mass/popular culture, theories of embodiment, urban anthropology, and visual culture. Most of my fieldwork has focused on cultures of sport in Japan and while I study and teach about all kinds of sport, football (soccer) is my ultimate passion. I am currently working to complete a book manuscript about soccer, corporate sport, the recession of the 1990s, and national identity in Japan, which is tentatively titled Fields for the Future: Soccer and Citizens in Japan at the Turn of the 21st Century. More locally, I’ve become interested in the issue of homelessness, particularly here in my hometown of Indianapolis, and hope to create a course and a research project focused on homeless individuals and their lives. 

 Here is a link to my webpage.

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Nancy Germano
Nancy Germano
Instructor – History

I teach courses in the Global and Historical Studies Program and courses in world history, environmental history, and cultural geography.  My research interests focus on U.S. urban environmental history (particularly in the Midwest), river flooding history, global environmental catastrophes, and women’s experiences of natural disasters. I earned a doctorate in history from Indiana University and a master’s in public history from IUPUI.

Paul Hanson
Professor – History
Antwain Hunter
Antwain Hunter

Antwain K. Hunter is a U.S. historian working on slavery and emancipation in the Antebellum South. He is a native of Leominster, Massachusetts and earned his B.A. in History at Westfield State College before heading to the University of Connecticut for his M.A., also in History. Dr. Hunter earned his Ph.D. in the Richards Civil War Era Center at the Pennsylvania State University. He teaches courses that cover topics and eras in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, including Colonial America, the American Revolution, American Slavery, the U.S. South, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the Transatlantic World.

Dr. Hunter’s current book project examines the legal and community dynamics of black North Carolinians’ firearm use in the colonial and antebellum eras. His recent publications include, “‘A nuisance requiring correction’: Firearm Laws, Black Mobility, and White Property in Antebellum Eastern North Carolina” in the North Carolina Historical Review; “‘In the Exercise of a Sound Discretion, Who, of This Class of Persons, Shall Have a Right to the License…’: Family, Race, and Firearms in Antebellum North Carolina” in the Journal of Family History; and “‘Patriots,’ ‘Cowards,’ and‘Men Disloyal at Heart:’ Labor and Politics at the Springfield Armory,1861-1865” in the Journal of Military History. He was also an on-screen contributing historian for America: Facts vs. Fiction’s episode on the Civil War (aired March 4, 2017 on AHC) and on the President Benjamin Harrison documentary “A President at the Crossroads” (aired October 19, 2017 on PBS/WFYI).

When he’s not working, Dr. Hunter likes engaging Butler students as a Faculty in Residence, fishing from his kayak, playing the guitar, watching college sports, playing hurling and Gaelic football with the Indianapolis Gaelic Athletic Association, cooking, and traveling to new places.

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Chris Jillson
Instructor – History
Jeana Jorgensen
Lynne Kvapil
Lynne Kvapil
Associate Professor of Classics

Lynne A. Kvapil, known by her students as Dr. K, is an archaeologist specializing in ancient Greece and Aegean Prehistory. Her research focuses on the Mycenaean Greeks, particularly farming, warfare, the manufacture of ceramics, and labor organization and management. As an active field archaeologist, Dr. K travels to Greece every summer, where she is the Assistant Director of the Nemea Center of Archaeology Excavations at the Mycenaean cemetery at Aidonia and the Petsas House Excavations at Mycenae. Dr. K has been awarded research funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Mediterranean Archaeological Trust to support her ongoing research on the Mycenaean Greeks, and she has been a part of a successful grant-writing team that has been awarded funding from the Archaeological Institute of America and the Loeb Foundation to support the excavations at Aidonia.

At Butler University, Dr. K teaches in all aspects of the ancient Mediterranean world, but most often she teaches about Ancient Greece, including Ancient Greek language courses, Ancient Greek Art and Myth, Ancient Greek Perspectives. She also teaches upper level courses in Ancient Greek and Roman Art and Architecture and Women in Antiquity. Dr. K is also a co-director of the Ancient Mediterranean Archaeology and Classics (AMCA) lab, which won a 2015 Butler University Innovation Grant and which aims to help put the material culture of the ancient world into the modern classroom.


Tom Mould
Tom Mould
Professor – Anthropology

Tom Mould teaches and conducts research in the areas of folklore, language and culture, American Indian studies, oral narrative, religious and sacred narrative, contemporary legend, identity, ethnography, genre, and performance theory. He is the author of the books ChoctawProphecy: A Legacy of the Future (2003), Choctaw Tales (2004), Still, the Small Voice: Revelation, Personal Narrative and the Mormon Folk Tradition (2011), and Overthrowing the Queen: Telling Stories of Welfare in America (2020), which won the Chicago Folklore Prize and the Brian McConnell Book Award from the International Society for Contemporary Legend Research. 

Before coming to Butler in 2019, he was the J.Earl Danieley Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Folklore at Elon University where he taught for 18 years and served in various roles including Director of the Honors Program and Chair of the Sociology and Anthropology Department. 

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Thomas Paradis
Thomas Paradis
Professor – History

Biography

Born and raised in northern Connecticut, Thomas (Tom) Paradis obtained his Bachelor’s degree in Geography at the Pennsylvania State University (1992), and his Masters (1994) and Ph.D. (1997) degrees in Geography: Urban & Rural Development from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He continued moving west to Flagstaff, Arizona in 1997 as faculty at Northern Arizona University (NAU), where he was recognized in 2011 and 2014 as a President’s Distinguished Teaching Fellow. He further served as the Chair of the Department of Geography, Planning & Recreation and as the university’s Director of Academic Assessment. As a professor of geography and community planning here at Butler, he is also an affiliate faculty member in Butler’s Science, Technology & Environmental Studies (STES) program. Having originally majored in meteorology at Penn State, he ended up teaching weather and climate at the U. of Illinois and later at NAU. He has thus recently developed a new course at Butler for the Natural Worlds block of the Core Curriculum called Weather, Climate & Society (NW 265). Beyond the fun of academics, Tom enjoys traveling, photography, railroad history and modeling, playing basketball, and was once an avid trumpet player in high school and the Penn State Blue Band (Go State!). 

Teaching and Scholarship

Tom’s areas of teaching and research encompass the topics of urban and cultural geography, downtown redevelopment, historic preservation, urban design, heritage tourism, Italy, the American Southwest, and the scholarship of teaching and learning. Having led several study-abroad programs in Viterbo and Siena, Italy to explore livable cities and walkable design, Tom is the author of several books, including Living the Palio: A Story of Community and Public Life in Siena, Italy (3rd edition 2020), and the Illustrated Encyclopedia of American Landmarks (2012), among earlier works. His recent follow-up book is Unbridled Spirit: The Untold Story of the 2018 Extraordinary Palio in Siena, Italy (Feb. 2020). He is now turning his sights to Singapore as he investigates the history of tourism development and tourist spaces there. 

Happy Hunger Games!

He also offers a creative First-Year Seminar (FYS) course focused on Unpacking the Hunger Games, an interdisciplinary approach to understanding our world through Suzanne Collins’ dystopian series. His latest book (fall, 2021) is A Place Called District 12: Appalachian Geography and Music in the Hunger Games (McFarland Press). 

Current and Upcoming Butler Courses

  • FYS 101: Unpacking the Hunger Games, Part 1 (every fall)
  • NW 265-ENV: Weather, Climate & Society (every fall, summer 2022)
  • ENV 315 (STES Program): Designing for Livable Cities (fall 2021)
  • FYS 102: Unpacking the Hunger Games, Part 2 (every spring)
  • HST 305 (Topics Course): American Architecture and Preservation (spring 2022)
  • HST 347: U.S. Urban History (spring 2022)
  • HST 346: American Historical Geography (spring 2023)

Zachary Scarlett
Zachary Scarlett
Associate Professor – History

Zachary Scarlett is an assistant professor of modern Chinese history. He works on Maoist politics and culture. His current manuscript project focuses on the Chinese Communist Party’s understanding of radical political movements in the 1960s. He is specifically interested in how the Communist Party and the Red Guards incorporated events like the civil rights movement, anti-Vietnam war protests, and other revolutionary activism into everyday political discourse. He conducted research for the project in Beijing from 2010 to 2011, which was supported by a Fulbright grant. Professor Scarlett is also broadly interested in the Global Sixties. He is the co-editor of The Third World in the Global 1960s, which examines radical social movements in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Outside of his research, Professor Scarlett teaches classes on modern China, East Asia, the Cold War, and environmental history. He received his Ph.D. from Northeastern University in 2013. 

Julie Searcy
Assistant Professor – Anthropology
Sholeh Shahrokhi
Sholeh Shahrokhi
Professor – Anthropology

Sholeh Shahrokhi is a Professor in Anthropology in the college of LAS at Butler University.

Dr. Shahrokhi received her Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of California at Berkeley in 2008.  In the same year, she began teaching at Butler in the Department of History and Anthropology, and across interdisciplinary programs such as Race Gender and Sexuality Studies; Peace Studies; International Studies; and Global and Historical Studies.

Her scholarship focuses on explorations of power as manifested in an intersectional and discursive expressions of gender, race, body, age, religion and ethnicity, urbanity, as socio-cultural frames of differences

Her research projects in Iran, France, the UK, and the United States have focused on the formation of gendered norms, ideas about sexuality, and most recently on the "crisis" of refugees in Europe and the political north. She has conducted research on art of/by refugees, creativity and aesthetics in political protest in Iran and across the Middle East; a gendered reading of visual politics of the body emerging from contemporary Iranian protest scene; alternative sexualities and lifestyles among young Iranians in the US; spatial claims to the city, the notion of trespass as resistance to urban violence among a category called "runaway daughters" in Tehran; contemporary trends in cosmetic surgeries, shifting ideals of masculinities, femininities, and beauty in Tehran. Her writing on Iran aims to diversify representation of the people, while remaining critical of strategies that exclude “others”.


Selected published works:

I. Book Chapters

Gender and Sexuality: An Anthropological Approach (2017), in Ethnology, Ethnography and Cultural Anthropology, [Eds. Paolo Barbaro], in Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS), Developed under the Auspices of the UNESCO, Eolss Publishers, Oxford, UK, [http://www.eolss.net] 

Iranian War Cinema: The Art of RememberingPain, in the Iranian War Cinema: National Identity, Ethnic Diversity, and Gender Issues, (2012). Edited book by P. Khosronejad. S. K. Publishing, Oxford:UK.

Beyond “tragedy”: A Cultural Critique of SexTrafficking of Young Iranian Women, in Sex Trafficking, Human Rights, andSocial Justice, (2010). Edited volume by T. Zheng. Routledge, NY.


II. Articles: 

Life jackets on shore: Anthropology, refugees, and the politics of belonging in Europe, in Anthropology of the Contemporary Middle East and Central Eurasia 4(2):11-33. (2018). Sean KingstonPublishing. Oxford: UK.

Body Aesthetics and Protest Art In Contemporary Iran (2014)

Adolescents’ perspective on addiction (2005) co-author. 
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1442-2018.2005.00237.x/full


III. Selected Conference Papers: 

"Family Albums in Flux: Portraits of life and memory across borders." Photo Albums Twisted Meaning: Between nostalgia and trauma. Institute of Art History of the Czech Academy of Sciences and DOX – Center for Contemporary Art. Prague, Cz. (November 2021).

"Life in Fragments: Anthropology and Art Across the Border". Hostile Terrain 94. Butler University. (October 2021). 

"Crossing the Border: Anthropology, identity politics, and the role of Art." A workshop organized by Zanan: Iranian Women in Northern California (April 2021).  

“Art-Activism – an exercise in love: Stories from Iranian refugees living in Europe.” Didar VaGoftar Seminar: A critical inquiry special group of Iranians in Indiana. Zionsville, Indiana. (2019)

“Between Lights andShadows: The art of ‘seeing’ refugees.” European Association of SocialAnthropologists (EASA). Staying, Moving, and Settling conference. StockholmUniversity. Stockholm, Sweden. (2018).

“Living as Trans*: The experiences from fieldwork in Tehran, Iran.” Transgender Lives in GlobalPerspective: Trans Lives in Iran. Religion Seminar by the Center for Faith andVocation at Butler University and the Desmond Tutu Center at the ChristianTheological Seminary. (2016)

Engendering the Protester: Body politics and sexual representation of the Iranian protests (2012)
https://gws.as.uky.edu/engendering-protester-body-politics-and-sexual-representation-iranian-political-protest-dr-sholeh

Body Beautiful: Making the Figure of Women in Film, Contemplation on the Iranian New Wave Cinema of the Past Decade (2009)
https://escholarship.org/uc/item/92f6p1p8


Courses (Butler):

I. Core Courses in the Social World
            SW 215 Being Human: An Introduction to Anthropology (Social Justice Diversity approved)
            SW 233 Political Islam in Paris

II. Core Courses in Global and Historical Studies
            GHS207 Global Women: Rights and Resistance
                          (Cross-listed: Gender Women Sexuality Studies, Social Justice Diversity approved)
            GHS211 Modern Middle East and North Africa (Social Justice Diversity approved) 

II. Core Courses in Perspectives in the Creative Arts
            PCA 215 Art Across Borders: Refugees in Political North

IV. Courses in Anthropology (Majors/Minors)
            AN 311 Trespass: Anthropology of Power & Difference
                         (Cross-listed: Peace and Conflict Studies, International Studies)
            AN 315 Gender and Colonialism (Cross-listed: GWSS)
            AN 320 Gender and Sexuality Through Globalization (Cross-listed: GWSS)
            AN 326 Youth and Global Cinema (cross-listed: IS and PACS)
            AN 328 Popular Culture: Michael Jackson
            AN 340 Non-western Art: Ethnographic Art
            AN 345 Conflict Resolution Through Art (Cross-listed: PACS, IS)
            AN 352 Anthropological Method: Ethnography (Writing: WAC)
            AN 368 Coming of Age in the Middle East (Cross-listed: PACS)
            AN 390 Anthropological Theory

View CV

Ageeth Sluis
Ageeth Sluis
Professor – History

I am a professor of Latin American History in the department of History and Anthropology, and affiliate faculty in Race, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (RGSS) and International Studies (IS). I am also currently the Director of Global and Historical Studies at Butler University.

I teach courses on a variety of subjects, but all deal in some way with the interplay of power, culture, identity formations and historical shifts. 

My scholarship generally lands at the intersections of gender, space, and the history of the Americas. You can find my articles in The Americas, the Journal of Urban History, and the Journal of Transnational American Studies (among others). My first book titled Deco Body/Deco City: Spectacle and Modernity in Mexico City (University of Nebraska Press, 2016) looks at how new ideas about femininity and female bodies influenced urban reform in Mexico’s capital city in the 1920s and 1930sMy new project, Warrior Power: Dreaming, Drugs, Death and the Search for Alternate Spirituality in Mexico during the Sixties and Seventies (tentative title), focuses on the interplay between the books and appeal of Carlos Castaneda, the history of anthropology, New Age sensibilities, popular imaginings of Mexico, and indigenismo.

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Amanda Waterhouse
Instructor – History
Emeriti Faculty
Bruce Bigelow
Bruce Bigelow

My interest in teaching centers on the historical cultural geography of the US, especially the Midwest. I also teach courses on the Civil War, US Urban History, the American Empire since 1945, the American Midwest, and World History. I also teach Cultural Geography: Regions of the World for the core curriculum. My publications focus on Indiana during the Civil War, especially politics, and also the Midwest as a culture region.


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George Geib
Emeritus Faculty
Susan Kenyon
Emeritus Faculty
Scott Swanson
Scott Swanson

When I was a boy, the TV show Robin Hood captivated me. The tales of Robin Hood in any form still do. I suppose that is what introduced the middle ages to my imagination, why I resorted to the Appleton public library to discover more, and why I became a medievalist. What now intrigues me about the middle ages in Europe is how such a dark and cold and poor place, really the third world of its time, brought to fruition some wonderful components of human well-being: a spiritual and psychological sense of the individual self, human rights theory, constitutional principles and practice, universities and rational thought, romanesque and gothic architecture, rose windows, new ideas about love and friendship. Medieval life also helps me ponder, as tales of Robin Hood display all too well, the disparities and inequities in the world, how and why people are so readily unjust, and how they justify hurting and disparaging other folk.

My mind was first formed in the public schools of the state of Wisconsin. Thereafter, I studied history at Yale, Cornell, and Oxford, focusing on the religious, constitutional, and personal dimensions of medieval life. My own research focuses on the medieval sources of human rights theory and on family history which puts faces to past life.

I came to Butler in 1991.  Here I teach core courses as well as history courses about the middle ages in Europe and elsewhere in the world. I helped found the gender studies program at Butler, served as director of both the gender studies and the honors program, and work with the peace studies program.

Music absorbs me, especially Bach, and I play the organ and piano.

I cook and will happily show anyone how to make gnocchi as my Italian grandmother showed me. I still use her potato ricer to make them.

In the accompanying picture, I’m the one on the left.

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