Olivia ’12 RSS feed

About Me:

My name is Olivia and I am a senior at Butler University. I spend most of my time in Lilly Hall as a BFA Dance Performance major. When not in rehearsal or ballet class, I write papers for my English Literature second major. In my super-abundant, never-lacking, this-is-highly-sarcastic spare time, I attempt to cook in my apartment kitchen, watch Youtube videos of ballet, knit sweaters that never seem to come to an end, and read books both silly and serious. If I could take any class at Butler just for kicks, I'd go for DiffyQ.

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Posts Tagged “green”

Week in Photos

I got a fancy new phone over break and have been having a blast with the camera and filters included in the camera app. Thus I give you my first week after spring break in photos:

First, the food. These were Chinese buns my boyfriend shared with me. They would have been perfect… except they had cilantro, which I don’t really like.

Speaking of the food, here is a rather blurry shot of the new cafeteria set up. Over winter break, Butler began and completed renovations to the Marketplace @ Atherton, which is the cafeteria open for most meals.

To change the subject completely, I give you a photo of the tiny house that’s been parked beside Norris Plaza. Jay Shafer came to Butler recently to speak. Very cool! I would have gone if I didn’t have rehearsal; I love environmental movements.

And the final picture I took Friday morning during the rainstorm that made my hair frizz completely and utterly beyond redemption. I am rather proud of this photo. Triple brownie points if you can guess from where I took it. Leave me a comment if you think you know where this is on campus!

Foodie Indy Review

Foodie Indy: eat well. eat local.

There is an orange pack of what looks like playing cards titled “Foodie Indy.” Twenty dollars each, the packs contain 52 gift certificates of $10 to 52 different Indianapolis-area, locally-owned restaurants. There’s a minimum purchase required for each certificate (usually $30, which cannot include alcoholic drinks, taxes, or some specials/other certificates).

If you are going out with a group, this is perfect. Even if you want a romantic dinner for two, this lets you splurge a little AND try a new, locally-owned restaurant. So far, I’ve gone to Monon Food Company and Asian Grill. Both were tasty. At the Asian Grill, I tried crab cakes and a curry dish; I had some rather tasty tea. At the MoFoCo (as they like to call themselves), I tried Hawaiian tacos, tomato parm soup, and mushroom pizza. And carrot cake. And really good coffee. (I was sharing all this food, mind you.)

The downside to the Foodie Indy cards? Many of the restaurants are in Noblesville, which is decidedly north of Indianapolis and requires a longer car drive.

It really should be called “Foodie Indy/Noblesville.”

The Horsey Set

My little sister got first place at her horse show this weekend! Very proud of her.

She goes to Dickinson, which, I must say, is waaaaaaay cooler in the environment/sustainable/vegetarian-friendly mode than Butler is. They even have a tab called “Sustainability” under their “About Us” heading. Sorry, Butler, you just don’t do that great a job of recycling, etc. You are trying, though, and I feel like it will get better and more and more environmentally-conscious students step forward.

Anyway, my sister is on Dickinson’s equestrian team. She told me to write a blog post about Butler’s team.

“I don’t think Butler has a team,” I told her. “At least, I’ve never heard of it.”

“Give me your computer,” she said. I gave. A few minutes later, she titled the screen so I could see Butler University Equestrian Team, which apparently is a club sport at Butler.

There really is something for everyone.

Butler’s Wildlife

There is an drainage pond on Butler’s campus, by the tennis bubble. I discovered it only this summer, since I never went to that end of Butler’s property until I lived at University Terrace. It’s made to collect rainwater so the drainage systems aren’t overwhelmed, and it provides a habitat for some local flora and fauna.

All this I learned from reading the rather handy sign. I must brag a little, however, and say I noticed the drainage area when I saw the incredible diversity of species clustered together. In my first honors class (the good one, not the horrible one), we talked about biodiversity in plant species when we read Biomimicry. Ever since, I’ve been especially attuned to places where the natural variation of plant and animal life is allowed to flourish.

Some classes are awesome like that.

I’ve been indulging my ecological side in following Butler’s own Center for Urban Ecology blog. Check it out!