Olivia ’12 RSS feed

About Me:

My name is Olivia and I am a senior at Butler University. I spend most of my time in Lilly Hall as a BFA Dance Performance major. When not in rehearsal or ballet class, I write papers for my English Literature second major. In my super-abundant, never-lacking, this-is-highly-sarcastic spare time, I attempt to cook in my apartment kitchen, watch Youtube videos of ballet, knit sweaters that never seem to come to an end, and read books both silly and serious. If I could take any class at Butler just for kicks, I'd go for DiffyQ.

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Posts Tagged “food”

Juicers and Jackfruit

To the Asia Mart! This weekend, besides attending many ballet performances/dress rehearsals/tech rehearsals, I found an Asian food store with my boyfriend. We were headed to a Target to stock up on tissues and such, but Asia Mart beckoned instead…

I found the rice! (This is only a small cross-section of the rice available, as you know if you have ever entered an Asian grocery.) While we elected not to buy any rice, we did purchase tea, gummy lychee and kiwi candy, pork buns, and red bean buns. What an excellent, unexpected find! Boyfriend has slowly but surely been shifting my taste palate to the East. Take this summer. We played chess (amidst a backdrop of heartfelt karaoke) and had halo-halo.

That’s milk, shaved ice, ube ice cream, coconut jellies, jackfruit, and various beans. At least as far as I understood it. I still can’t down the iced jelly drinks or the taro-tapioca smoothies, but I will help the process!

Butler has been great about widening my palate: I’ve had various Filipino foods, Latvian foods, beets, etc… Just the other night, my roommate received her long-awaited juicer. Do you know how many things you can juice? We all had an invigorating drink of cucumber-grape-kale-ginger-apple juice.

Living in the on-campus Apartment Village housing had led to loads of cooking adventures.

Juice?

College Cooking: Recipes for the New Chef

Let’s set the record straight. When I entered my first apartment in Butler’s Apartment Village last fall, I set the stove on fire. I’m not a horrible cook, but making meals when the fancy strikes remains a far different beast from the responsibility of feeding oneself every single meal. That said, I still did not want to take the commuter meal plan option, since my schedule didn’t allow for convenient meal times in Atherton Union. Also, this way ended up being cheaper.

So I learned a few quick and dirty recipes perfect for the college student chef. In the next few posts scattered randomly throughout the semester, look for recipes like:

  • Spaghetti and Meat Sauce
  • Fried Rice
  • Chocolate Banana Pancakes
  • Curried tofu, spinach, and chickpeas
  • Not Quite Ramen
  • Tomato basil salad
  • My friend’s Healthy S*** in a Pan

If you are an experienced cook, I guess some of these might seem obvious. For the new cook, half the trouble isn’t making the food — it’s trying to think of what to make. On that note, if anyone has some easy (quick, inexpensive, yummy) recipe suggestions, please chime in!

My sous chef stirs the chili (recipe courtesy of my Latvian Roommate).

BSI Wrap-Up

After BSI ended, my roommate and I moved out in the insufferable heat. Because we are living in the same apartment as last year, we paid a fee to store our belongings in the apartment during the summer; thus the journey from UT to AV was not that far. The heat stretched the distances, though, and I ended up leaving Butler an hour later than planned.

Also, I have now lived in every non-Greek Butler residence hall except for Ross.

After leaving Butler, I visited my boyfriend and his family in Chicago, and it was epic as usual: spending time with wonderful people, eating wonderful food, playing wonderful games of badminton, and learning the wonderfully addictive game of mahjong. I need to get a set so I can learn to tell the contents of a tile simply by feeling it with my fingers. I’ve seen it in action, and it is incredibly intimidating. We stayed up well past midnight and shouted Chinese and Spanish words and generally had a grand time.

Now I am home playing with my sisters and my parents and my rabbit, as well as studying for the GRE (taking it soon in August) and working on an independent study (for a Butler English class to attain my second major). It’s been busy, but it is wonderful to be home!

The bunnies say “hi.”

Final BSI Dinner

Wow. BSI is over. Students have been presenting Friday through Wednesday (today) for two or three hours each morning. We had our final BSI lunch Tuesday night, and I spent a lovely evening with four other students, a history professor, a creative writing professor, and two chemistry professors. Since the students consisted of two international studies majors, two creative writing majors, and me (Dance performance and English Lit), I was glad we didn’t talk about super artsy things the entire night. Got to let the science people have their say. : )

I learned that “aromatic” means something different in chemistry than in the rest of the world. This means, “So someone told me ethers were like aromatic rabbits” does not make for quite the conversation starter I thought it might. Turns out “aromatic” isn’t quite the word, and I would have done better quoting my friend’s actual “smelly bunnies.” Instead, I discovered “aromatic” refers to the configuration of bonds. (Is that it? Is that even close?)

It also turns out, with some quick internet searching, that I might have confused “ether” and “ester,” since esters are definitely smelly, but ethers look more like rabbits. Well, I found a snazzy dimethyl ether on wikipedia…

It also, also turns out that chemists are people too and thus perfectly well qualified to speak on matters other than chemistry. Still, I do love some chemistry talk. This summer has been wonderful, getting to hear about all the science projects. After listening to an explanation of the G-protein receptors project about four times, I think I might sort of get it!

Watching the chemistry presentations was definitely harder than the others, since so much of the basic language tends to baffle the average liberal arts major. (I still don’t know the difference between a substrate and a reagent. I vaguely understand the function of primers.) I finally, finally got a grasp on “stereochemistry,” and line structures aren’t quite so mystifying. I think the chemistry presentations did a good job of catering to a mixed, partially non-science audience.

But dinner! Dinner was at Shanghi Lil’s in Indianapolis with all the BSI students and the large percentage of mentors who could make it. Dinner was served family-style, as all Chinese meals should be served, and it was absolutely delicious. Pineapple shrimp. Pineapple. Shrimp. Pineapple shrimp. Genius.

(I also just typed “pinaepple” every single time I attempted to write “pineapple.”)

I will have to update you on the ant infestation in our apartment and on final presentations… but now I simply must go make some toast and Skype with a friend.

Summer at Butler: What I Learned

  • The “so hard to say goodbye” in “She Will Be Loved” by Maroon 5 can use a I V IV V I chord progression.
  • Fish tacos in Chicago make an excellent snack.
  • Welsh eisteddfodau: Grown men dress in bardic robes for the ceremony which declares the winner of the traditional-form, Welsh-language poetry competition. There is a sword involved, and the whole crowd shouts “Peace!” in Welsh.
  • Pianos are expensive.
  • BSI projects can be wicked cool: YouTube Preview Image
  • Both Howards End and Portrait of the Artist as a Young Dog are more entertaining than A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.
  • If you leave your bike overnight at the IMA, the snack fairy leaves you a fruit bar.
  • Don’t use the recipe on the side of the cornmeal container to make cornbread, because it doesn’t taste very good. On the other hand, add a bit of coco powder to pancake batter, then some bananas to make chocolate banana pancakes. Heavenly.
  • Guerilla knitting happens.

    I saw this tree when I visited Downer's Grove during my epic trip to Chicago.

  • English publications generally don’t like papers over twenty-five pages.
  • Some species of sour cherries are self-compatible.
  • The GRE is a) necessary for grad school; b) expensive; c) changing and half price if taken this August or September; or d) all of the above.
  • Biking up hills is much easier when one’s bike is not stuck on the lowest gear.
  • Jude the Obscure is the most depressing book in the English language, and, as Jasper Fforde recommends, one should read it backwards if there is to be any chance of a happy ending.
  • G-protein receptors. They exist. You have them almost everywhere in your body.
  • ISIS stands for “Image subtraction, image subtraction.”
  • Straws aren’t so bad after all.
  • Euchre isn’t so complicated after all.
  • Don’t put potato peels down the kitchen garbage disposal. You’ll only clog the sink and render the dishwasher unusable for almost a week.

BSI Roundup

This summer, I read and I wrote, then I read a bit more, got distracted, regathered my focus, and wrote again. Let’s compare the stats, shall we?

As of  the morning of July 14, 2011,

Number of Word documents associated with BSI project: was 43, now 85

Number of paper drafts: was 2, now 17

Words written in current paper draft: was 3907, now 7488

Number of sources read in whole or in part: was 11, now 22

Times the current paper draft uses the word “Anglo-Celtic”: was 4, now 10

Times the current paper draft uses the word “Welsh”: was 35, now 116

Times the current paper draft uses the word “Irish”: was 46, now 70

Times the current paper draft uses the word “Wales”: was 23, now 43

Times the current paper draft uses the word “Ireland”: was 21, now 49

Times the current paper draft uses the word “tradition” or “traditional”: no previous statistic, now 104

Times the current paper draft uses the word “bard”: no previous statistic, now 146

Times the current paper draft uses the word “bardic”: no previous statistic, now 49

Cups of tea consumed: was ??, now ????

Websites most visited: was Butler email, BBC News, RSS reader, Facebook, and Pandora, now Butler email, BBC News, Youtube, this blog page, and the Welsh National Eisteddfod page

Outside of BSI research, I did all this stuff:

BSI Events: First FridaysKeep Indianapolis Beautiful, many lunches with mentors, GRE explaining, IMA exploring, Indians baseball game (Whoops, I didn’t post pictures for that one. Mostly because it was the longest game ever and we spent most of the time bandying about science jokes: see below), discussions about ethics, discussions about presentations…

Other activities: raspberry sale at the grocery store, piano lessons with my friend, breakfast in Broad Ripple, breakfast downtown, ballet classes, Chicago trip, Bananagrams, biking to church, biking to the coffee shop, CD making, picture drawing, GRE practice test taking, knitting, Wii night, bingo night, trip to Richmond to see my sister graduate…

A lot has happened this summer!

Does anyone else have fun statistics from their summer break to share? Visits to the pool, popsicles consumed, ballet classes attended, books read?

More Tastiness in Chicago

I meant to leave my trip to Chicago alone, but the many, many pictures have forced me into another post which will possibly be of no interest whatsoever to the reader. But I do love food festivals.

The best item — and the first one — I got at Taste was a fish taco. I got the mild hot sauce, though my best friend insisted on getting some of the hottest on the side. To each his own!

Then my  friend got a strange ice milk jelly object. It was okay, he told me. Since it had ice, tapioca, jelly, a milky-tea-bit, and was supposed to have red bean (though they didn’t add it), I decided to pass.

One stand was selling fruit, watermelon and cherries, grapes and pineapple, for rather good prices. Though it was not as hot as it was supposed to be that day, the watermelon was still quite refreshing. Add the frozen banana I got, and you have our Taste of Chicago purchases!

I suppose I should blog about something other than food. Next time, I promise! (I hope.)

Power + Outage = Chicago

A scheduled power outage for maintenance this weekend on Butler campus meant stuff stopped happening from Friday to Monday. This meant I could jet off to Chicago to spend a few days with my boyfriend and his family.

(“Jet off” is another term for “take the Megabus, which will come an hour late and have you praying several times during the highway portion of the trip.”)

It was wonderful. There was the hospitality of my boyfriend’s family (could not say enough). There was Chicago (Taste, Millennium Park, Chinatown, Navy Pier). There was piano playing, my first dim sum experience, a movie, a train, a far too sugary cinnamon sugar pretzel, siopao, surprisingly delicious pancit canton, fruit salad with condensed milk and coconut, this somehow turned into a list of the food I ate while I was there….

If I had to spend July 4th away from my home in Richmond, I think got the best possible of scenarios.

Taste of Chicago

My first dim sum experience: delicious and entertaining

The OTHER side of Navy Pier

Lunch with wonderful people

NOTE: power + outage = chicago

a = 1, g = 2, p = 3, r = 4, t = 5, u = 6, w = 7, c = 8, h = 9, i = 10, e = 20

OR

char letter[] = {‘a’, ‘g’, ‘p’, ‘r’, ‘t’, ‘u’, ‘w’, ‘c’, ‘h’, ‘i’, ‘e’};

for(int x = 0; x < 10; x++){

cout << letter[x] << ” = ” << x + 1;

cout << “, “;

if(x = 9) cout << letter[10] << ” = 20″;

}

magicmagic();

ETCETERA…

Summer at Butler: The Baking

This summer I have the good fortune to live with my roommate from our school-year apartment–the troublesome one who forces me to eat cupcakes–the one who spent a semester in France–the one who bakes.

Butler offers more than one option for its study abroad programming. My roommate went with IES, which has programs all over the world. The IES program was not a direct exchange (meaning an international student would not come to Butler when she went to France), which changes the financial aid. The nice thing about Butler, she says, is that there are lot of different programs from which to chose and so a vast array of cities. The downside? “It can be a bit confusing,” she told me.

She makes wonderful things.

She airbrushed the cake underneath this captain for Talk Like a Pirate Day.

The row of three dozen delicious cupcakes on our dining/coffee table. Chocolate, red velvet, and almond caramel.

Cakes someone ordered from her. That wire rack has come in handy after all!

I’ve been baking a bit as well. Last time I mentioned banana bread and cake. Well, I did not take a picture of the banana bread — it’s good, I promise — but I do have one of the snake cake. My baking roommate had leftover homemade frosting from some cupcakes, and I started to swirl the two colors. With a few details, we came up with snakes!

Snake cake:

Have a good Fourth of July! I hope you get a cake like this one. Or a custard tart like this. Don’t they look delicious?

 

Sssssssss...

Summer at Butler: The Food

University Terrace, where I am staying this summer for Butler Summer Institute, has no microwave. This has not been too much of an issue. I did go upstairs to use a neighbor’s when I had a microwave Palak Paneer for dinner. (Is it still a “neighbor” if I live on a different floor, on the opposite side of the building?)

However, I am currently writing a blog post while my butter slowly comes to room temperature for the banana bread. Today I baked a cake for a potluck, roasted potatos/carrots/onion, and am about to finish banana bread. Since operations have stalled, I shall instead post pictures of food. Because I really, truly love food.

Pancakes– regular, chocolate chip, strawberry, and chocolate batter with banana

Quiche. A magical quiche my best friend made for me. It was quite a successful meal we had. Breakfast for dinner never fails.

The aforementioned quiche

Then I made a cake with my roommate.

We did a double-decker type model with my roommate’s homemade icing between the layers. I put blueberries on top. Then we put a glaze over the powdered sugar–and then it looked like a giant doughnut:

A huge doughnut

It was just a mix, but it certainly tastes good enough!

And then, I ate curry for lunch and dinner and lunch again. I left out the potatoes and chickpeas and added extra carrots, so it’s a lovely orange color.

So many good meals. I wonder if the banana bread’s butter has reached room temperature yet?