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Butler campus
Modern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Chinese

Students in China

With over 730 million speakers, Mandarin Chinese is the most-used language in the world. And in today’s globalized economy, China has risen to rival the United States for superpower status.

The Department of Modern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures offers you a Chinese major and minor that intensively explore all aspects of the Mandarin dialect, the Simplified Chinese Character System of writing, and Pinyin—all while exposing you to the rich literatures, cultures, and business climates of China and Chinese American communities.

Led by native speakers, our Chinese program supports interdisciplinary study with many other Butler departments, programs, and colleges, including BusinessInternational Studies, History and Anthropology, Global and Historical Studies (GHS)Communication, Pharmacy, and the fine arts.

Join us and take advantage of:

Browse our course offerings.

Financial Support

Please read through these lists of numerous Prestigious Scholarship Opportunities (scroll down to "language study"), as well as study abroad scholarships (CIEE and IFSA-Butler) and travel grants.

Check out the annual Liberal Arts and Sciences $1,000 essay contest (typically due by January), the annual John Weidner Endowed Scholarship for Altruism (typically due by March), and the annual Corrine Welling Scholarship (typically due by April).

For international students, here's some advice and information on Scholarships and Grants set aside specifically for you.

If you encounter a short-term, unforeseen financial hardship or immediate expense that's impacting your academic success, please read about the Butler Emergency Assistance Fund.

Requirements for the Chinese Major

Download our Chinese major/minor packet. (PDF)

Overview

The Chinese major consists of a minimum 33 credit hours overall.

You'll need at least 24 credits of Chinese Language and at least nine credits in approved electives.

Students who major in Chinese normally include study abroad in their programs.

For Core Curriculum requirements, please visit the Core Curriculum website.​

Chinese Language Courses
  • CN 100, Chinese Character Writing (1)
  • CN 101, Beginning Chinese 1 (3)
  • CN 102, Beginning Chinese 2 (3)
  • CN 200, Chinese Conversation (1)
  • CN 203, Intermediate Chinese 1 (3)
  • CN 204, Intermediate Chinese 2 (3)
  • CN 300, Chinese for Oral Communication (3, Speaking Across the Curriculum when designated)
  • CN 305, Advanced Chinese 1 (3)
  • CN 306, Advanced Chinese 2 (3)
  • CN 310, Chinese for Written Communication (3)
  • CN 315, Chinese for Business (3)
  • CN 401, Internship in Chinese (1)
  • CN 402, Internship in Chinese (2)
  • CN 403, Internship in Chinese (3)
  • CN 491, Independent Study (1)
  • CN 492, Independent Study (2)
  • CN 493, Independent Study (3)
  • CN 499, Honors in Thesis in Chinese (3)
Electives
  • CN 401, Internship in Chinese (1)
  • CN 402, Internship in Chinese (2)
  • CN 403, Internship in Chinese (3)
  • CN 491, Independent Study (1)
  • CN 492, Independent Study (2)
  • CN 493, Independent Study (3)
  • CN 499, Honors in Thesis in Chinese (3)
  • FL 320, Chinese Civilization (in English) (3)
  • FL 390, Seminar (in English) (3)
  • FL 480, Topics: Chinese Studies (in English) (3)
  • HST 305, Topics in History: Youth and Revolution in Modern China (3)
  • HST 371, Modern China (3)
  • HST 373, China and the World (3)
  • PO 380, Frenemies: Understanding U.S.–China Relations (3)
  • RL 391, Seminar on Religion and World (Topics) (1)
Other Courses
  • FL 499, Senior Keystone (1, in English; pass/fail; encouraged for all minors; does not count toward major)
  • GHS 205, Global and Historical Studies (GHS): East Asian Interactions (3, Core—does not count toward major)

NOTE: Requirements for incoming students may not reflect the degree requirements of current students.

Current students are encouraged to consult their academic advisement report in my.butler.edu to see their individual requirements and progress toward program completion. However, students are welcome to consult the Modern Languages department chair, who determines program completion confirmation.

Requirements for the Chinese Minor

Download our Chinese major/minor packet. (PDF)

Overview

The Chinese minor consists of 21 hours in approved courses.

At least 12 of these hours must be at the 300 level or above.

Students who minor in Chinese normally include study abroad in their programs.  

Courses Offered
  • CN 100, Chinese Character Writing (1)
  • CN 101, Beginning Chinese 1 (3)
  • CN 102, Beginning Chinese 2 (3)
  • CN 200, Chinese Conversation (1)
  • CN 203, Intermediate Chinese 1 (3)
  • CN 204, Intermediate Chinese 2 (3)
  • CN 300, Chinese for Oral Communication (3, Speaking Across the Curriculum when designated)
  • CN 305, Advanced Chinese 1 (3)
  • CN 306, Advanced Chinese 2 (3)
  • CN 310, Chinese for Written Communication (3)
  • CN 315, Chinese for Business (3)
  • CN 401, Internship in Chinese (1)
  • CN 402, Internship in Chinese (2)
  • CN 403, Internship in Chinese (3)
  • CN 491, Independent Study (1)
  • CN 492, Independent Study (2)
  • CN 493, Independent Study (3)
  • CN 499, Honors in Thesis in Chinese (3)
  • FL 320, Chinese Civilization (in English) (3)
  • FL 390, Seminar (in English) (3)
  • FL 480, Topics: Chinese Studies (in English) (3)
  • HST 305, Topics in History: Youth and Revolution in Modern China (3)
  • HST 371, Modern China (3)
  • HST 373, China and the World (3)
  • PO 380, Frenemies: Understanding U.S.–China Relations (3)
  • RL 391, Seminar on Religion and World (Topics) (1)
Other Courses
  • FL 499, Senior Keystone (1, in English; pass/fail; encouraged for all minors; does not count toward minor)
  • GHS 205, Global and Historical Studies (GHS): East Asian Interactions (3, Core—does not count toward minor)

NOTE: Requirements for incoming students may not reflect the degree requirements of current students.

Current students are encouraged to consult their academic advisement report in my.butler.edu to see their individual requirements and progress toward program completion. However, students are welcome to consult the Modern Languages department chair, who determines program completion confirmation.

How to Declare the Chinese Major or Minor

To declare a Chinese major or minor, simply complete a "Major/Minor/Program Change Form" in the Dean's office of your primary major.  The LAS Dean's office is located in Jordan Hall 237.

  • Under "old plan", list all majors and minors that you currently have.
  • Under "new plan", list all of the majors and minors that you want to appear on your transcripts.  If there is more than one major, document which will be your primary major and which will be your secondary major.  List all minors.

Example:

Old:   English - primary major

          No minors

New: English - primary major

         Chinese - secondary major

         Psychology - minor

 

The sooner you declare a major or minor, the sooner you can ensure that you are on track to complete all the requirements.

Once the form has completed the approval process, Registration and Records will update your My.Butler portal.  The Administrative Specialist in Modern Languages (MLLC) will email you with an acknowledgment of the added major or minor, and assign an advisor if necessary.  The advisor can help you find a selection of language courses that complement your other work being done at the University, as well as help you prepare for study abroad programs.

Chinese Courses

Below is a listing of classes that may be offered during your studies at Butler.  For the most updated list of topics and other information, please review our  course offerings.

CN100 Chinese Character Writing

In this course you will learn and master Chinese character writing by understanding the evolution and basic structure of its system, and putting character construction into practice. You'll study the elementary radicals from which characters are created, and become familiar with correct stroke order. And, by the end of the course, you'll master approximately 150 basic Chinese characters. The understanding of the origin, history, and organization of these characters will greatly facilitate the continued development of your reading and writing proficiencies, whether you're a beginner or a continuing student wishing to review. If your past experience focused on the Traditional Chinese Character System, this course will help in your transition to the newer, Simplified Chinese Character System. This course augments the work you're completing in other Chinese courses. Prerequisite: none. (U)(1).Occasionally

CN101 Beginning Chinese 1

Development of speaking, listening, and writing skills, and insights into Chinese culture. Regular practice in the language center. (U)(3) Fall

CN102 Beginning Chinese 2

Development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills and insights into Chinese culture. Regular practice in the language center. (U)(3) 

CN103 Beginning Chinese Conversation

This course is designed for students who have no background in Chinese language. Because of the need to study abroad and complete internships, among other business and academic purposes, at least a basic understanding of Chinese (particularly the Mandarin dialect and Simplified Character System) is necessary. This course will introduce you to Chinese to help prepare you "survive" in China or Chinesespeaking environments. (for example, this will help prepare you if you're taking part in an internship program in China.) You'll learn how to greet people appropriately, navigate social situations politely, order food, locate bathrooms, take taxis, shop, and more. You'll participate in an introductory analysis of some cultural differences between Chinese society and that of the U.S. (U)(1) Occasionally

CN200 Chinese Conversation

As you enter the intermediate level, this course will help you develop your oral proficiency. You'll build up your vocabulary and learn to use correct grammar and sentence structures, as well as handle social protocols properly in various situations. You'll engage in extensive class discussions to increase accuracy and fluency. By the end of the course, you'll not only be able to engage with your classmates in various conversations, but also present general descriptions and make brief arguments. This course augments the work you're completing at the intermediate level. Prerequisite: completion of CN 102, placement at the 200 level, or permission of the department chair. (U)(1) Occasionally

CN203 Intermediate Chinese 1

Practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing for communication skills. Review of fundamentals. Use of the Modern LanguageCenter. Prerequisite: One year of college Chinese or placement by evaluation. (U)(3) Fall

CN204 Intermediate Chinese 2

Continuing practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing for communicative skills. Further review of fundamentals. Use of the Modern Language Center. Prerequisite: CN203, placement by evaluation or the equivalent. (U)(3) Spring

CN300 Chinese for Oral Communication

Oral Mandarin Chinese class to improve students' spoken language fluency. Intensive class activities include learning audio materials, watching movies, reading texts, class discussion, and presentation. Prerequisite: Two years of college Chinese or placement at the 300 level. (U)(3) Annually, term varies

CN305 Advanced Chinese 1

Further develop students' overall language proficiency and emphasize vocabulary building, consolidation of essential grammatical patterns, and insights into Chinese culture. Use of the language laboratory and videos. Prerequisite: Two years of college Chinese or placement at the 300 level. (U)(3) Annually, term varies

CN306 Advanced Chinese 2

Continue to develop students' overall language proficiency and emphasize vocabulary building, consolidation of essential grammatical patterns, and insights into Chinese culture. Use of the language laboratory and videos. Prerequisite: CN305, placement by evaluation, or the equivalent. (U)(3) Annually, term varies

CN310 Chinese for Written Communication

In this course you will improve your Chinese writing skills via a variety of contexts and genres, achieving improved expression of ideas and arguments utilizing the Simplified Character System of writing. The styles of writing include short story, biography, autobiography, essay, news, letter, diary, email, blog, resume, and art review (e.g., book, film, dance performance, etc.). You'll further develop organizational and critical thinking skills, while demonstrating an awareness of language and culture through written work. This course includes time in class for instructor-guided peer review and editing, aswell as discussions based upon student writings and selected Chinese readings. Prerequisite: CN204, placement at the 300 level, or permission of the department chair. (U)(3).Occasionally

CN315 Chinese for Business

You will learn how to do business within Chinese society via acquisition of basic terminology and by familiarizing yourself with common practices in China's marketplace-including trading, banking, marketing, finance, investment, etc. The course will be taught entirely in Chinese. Prerequisite: CN 204, placement at the 300 level, or permission of the department chair. (U)(3) Occasionally

CN320 Topics in Chinese

Study of a selected topic in the cultures of China and/or the Chinese-speaking world. Themes may deal with literary, social, political, and/or aesthetic concerns of these regions of the world. Repeatable with different topics. Prerequisite: CN204 or 300 placement. (U)(3) Occasionally

CN330 Chinese/English Translation

Chinese/English translation of literary, media, and other texts to develop language and cultural skills. Students will build up their vocabulary, get familiar with major translation strategies and appreciate linguistic and cultural differences between English and Chinese. Prerequisite: CN204 or CN300 Placement. (U)(3) Occasionally

CN401 Internship in Chinese

A faculty-supervised work experience in schools, hospitals, not-for-profits, government, media, business, or other institutions. Primary language must be Chinese. May be completed abroad or in the United States. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the internship program, completion of at least two 300-level Chinese courses, and/or permission of the department chair. (U)(1) Fall, spring, and summer

CN402 Internship in Chinese

A faculty-supervised work experience in schools, hospitals, not-for-profits, government, media, business, or other institutions. Primary language must be Chinese. May be completed abroad or in the United States. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the internship program, completion of at least two 300-level Chinese courses, and/or permission of the department chair. (U)(2) Fall, spring, and summer

CN403 Internship in Chinese

A faculty-supervised work experience in schools, hospitals, not-for-profits, government, media, business, or other institutions. Primary language must be Chinese. May be completed abroad or in the United States. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the internship program, completion of at least two 300-level Chinese courses, and/or permission of the department chair. (U)(3) Fall, spring, and summer

CN491 Independent Study

Independent study of Chinese culture, literature and language. (U)(1) Occasionally

CN492 Independent Study

Independent study of Chinese culture, literature and language. (U)(2) Occasionally

CN493 Independent Study

Independent study of Chinese culture, literature and language. (U)(3) Occasionally

CN499 Honors Thesis

Written Honors Thesis (and its public presentation) can be used to help earn Modern Languages Departmental High or Highest Honors for your major (when eligible). The purpose of CN 499 Honors Thesis is to: equip you with research techniques, terminology, methodology, and other language-specific knowledge you'll need in order to successfully complete a thesis proposal and undertake the thesis; help you prepare for the public presentation of your work; and help you prepare for and take the department's approved language assessment exam. Prerequisites: One course from CN305-498, acquisition of a Chinese thesis advisor, and permission of the department chair. (U)(3) Fall and spring

 

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What Bulldogs Dream, We Do

Eshan Pua

Chinese Major Alumna Eshan Pua

Eshan Pua grew up in a Chinese-speaking household and lived in the Philippines and Malaysia before coming to the United States at age 8. “But, I did not know how to read or write Chinese,” she said.

At Butler, Pua studied Communication Sciences and Disorders, as preparation for a graduate degree in speech language pathology. She also took several Chinese courses, leading to her to declare an Individualized Major in Chinese Language and Culture.

In 2013, Pua received a national Fulbright-Hays scholarship that she used for eight months of study in China, including an internship with Xi’an High Technology Industries there.

Also, Chinese program coordinator Xiaoqing Liu, PhD helped Pua arrange a summer study abroad trip to China through the Confucius Institute at Butler's Consortium partner IUPUI. She interacted with students at Sun-Yat Sen University in Guangzhou, studied at historical sites, and served as an aide at an orphanage.

Many of the orphans Pau met had disabilities that affected their communication. She envisioned assisting them as a speech language pathologist (SLP). According to Pua, SLP training in the different Chinese dialects is challenging.

A clear understanding and knowledge of the Chinese language and culture, merged with professional training, has equipped me to practice speech language pathology successfully in China. —Eshan Pua