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About Me:

My name is Olivia and I am a senior at Butler University. I spend most of my time in Lilly Hall as a BFA Dance Performance major. When not in rehearsal or ballet class, I write papers for my English Literature second major. In my super-abundant, never-lacking, this-is-highly-sarcastic spare time, I attempt to cook in my apartment kitchen, watch Youtube videos of ballet, knit sweaters that never seem to come to an end, and read books both silly and serious. If I could take any class at Butler just for kicks, I'd go for DiffyQ.

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Posts Tagged “Indianapolis”

Foodie Indy Review

Foodie Indy: eat well. eat local.

There is an orange pack of what looks like playing cards titled “Foodie Indy.” Twenty dollars each, the packs contain 52 gift certificates of $10 to 52 different Indianapolis-area, locally-owned restaurants. There’s a minimum purchase required for each certificate (usually $30, which cannot include alcoholic drinks, taxes, or some specials/other certificates).

If you are going out with a group, this is perfect. Even if you want a romantic dinner for two, this lets you splurge a little AND try a new, locally-owned restaurant. So far, I’ve gone to Monon Food Company and Asian Grill. Both were tasty. At the Asian Grill, I tried crab cakes and a curry dish; I had some rather tasty tea. At the MoFoCo (as they like to call themselves), I tried Hawaiian tacos, tomato parm soup, and mushroom pizza. And carrot cake. And really good coffee. (I was sharing all this food, mind you.)

The downside to the Foodie Indy cards? Many of the restaurants are in Noblesville, which is decidedly north of Indianapolis and requires a longer car drive.

It really should be called “Foodie Indy/Noblesville.”

Downtown Indy: The Dance Party Version

Being a good blogger, I took some footage of my friends enjoying the festivities in downtown Indianapolis. When we went, it was all decorated for the Super Bowl. The giant Roman numeral XLVI apparently served as the backdrop for a light show… though the music far outranked the images in terms of excitement. Watch the video below for a taste of Super Bowl Indianapolis!

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Don’t forget about the other Souper Bowl this weekend!

Downtown Indy: Dance and Football

On Friday night, I went with a group of dance majors who belong to Sigma Rho Delta (honorary dance service fraternity) to see Dance Kaleidoscope‘s show at the Indianapolis Repertory Theater. The title was Super Soul: Motown and More, and each of the pieces were choreographed to music by artists like Stevie Wonder and Michael Jackson. I know I’m biased, but my favorite piece was Quiet Storm, choreographed by Butler dance professor Cynthia Pratt. The piece remained witty and playful without resorting to tricks — an easy trap when you dance to such a catchy tune as “ABC” by Jackson 5…

After the show we waited to congratulate the two Butler alumni who dance with the company. They looked fabulous! After seeing them off, we decided to walk around downtown Indy, since we’d already paid $20 for parking. Circle Center was lit up for the Superbowl and it seemed like everyone was out and about — the sidewalks bristled with pedestrians. We made a hot chocolate stop. There might have been some impromptu improv in front of the Superbowl letters.

All in all, it made for a thoroughly exciting night.

Gala Weekend

This weekend marked the Indianapolis City Ballet’s Gala performances. The Young Stars of Ballet was Friday night; Evening with the Stars, Saturday.

I saw the Evening With the Stars program with a large portion of Butler’s dance department. The dance service fraternity, Sigma Rho Delta, purchased a bunch of tickets, so I got mine at a slightly discounted price and got to discuss the show with my friends. The artsy photo above (as well as most of the other photos in this post) happened when I gave my camera to photographer friend, whose camera was out of battery. Thank you!

So we went to the Gala. The performers were all beautiful. I was not quite as blown away as I had been in years past — some of the newly commissioned pieces and some performances of old pieces did not quite do it for me — but all the stars still made for a great show.

I saw famous people! This was Friday night, when I participated in the Young Stars of Ballet. I made eye contact with Daniil Simkin — weird. For the only picture of the stars that night, see the bus above in front of the theater. The Murat Theatre is beautiful, more so when it’s actually visible in the daylight.

I’m not sure about the Coors sign on the marquee, though… Classy? Anyway, there were some great performances, odd choreography and opinions concerning style notwithstanding. I especially appreciated the representative from the Trockadero Ballet, the ballerino Paul Ghiselin/Ida Nevasayneva, performing a touching rendition of the Dying Swan.

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Art scholarship is cool

Art scholarship is cool. I had never really given it much thought, though I always enjoyed my trips to the Indianapolis Museum of Art. The IMA is quite close to Butler’s campus, and I rode my bike there for the BSI event I attended last Thursday afternoon. Close proximity to a free art museum is one of the many perks of attending Butler University… (nudgenudge, I’m winking at you, prospective students whom I saw touring today in the Atherton basement. I was the one in the flowered dress smiling at you when the guide mentioned the ATM I was using.)

Anyway, for the IMA program a guide / art scholar gave a short talk; we then split into groups of threes and fours to make our way through a selection of six contemporary works of art. At each work, we wrote our initial impressions, research questions, technology connections, and queries for the artist. Afterward we regrouped, discussed, and were given ticket vouchers to attend some of the special exhibits.

Art scholarship can be cool. I never really felt engaged with artwork before, but the simple exercises we did have me raring to return and think more carefully about the work displayed. Thank you, BSI/IMA, for helping unravel the mystery of visual art.

When we reemerged after the program, the rain hurled itself to the earth not in drops but in bucket-sized sections. Biking home via the canal path? Even if my brakes worked while wet, the rain would reduce visibility too much. A fellow Butler student was kind enough to give me a ride home. We were soaked even from the short run from IMA lobby to door.

The rain abated, and the next day my roommate dropped me off at the IMA. (One can walk, though it takes a bit longer.) I biked back, though not before puzzling over the gift someone left for me.

(I just spent 45 minutes figuring out how to transfer this picture from my phone to my computer. Appreciate it.)

I found a fruit bar, apple, unopened, and squished from my bungee cord attached to the back of my bike. I poked it, and nothing exploded. Someone must have left it there overnight. But why?

This is a mystery I fear we shall never solve. The fruit bar is still on my desk, a week later. I somehow don’t want to eat it, but since it’s unopened I haven’t the heart to throw it out.

BSI: The Summary

So what do I do all day during BSI?

There’s always, always breakfast with a mug of tea, followed by work on BSI. Ballet happens at some point, and cooking adventures occur in the evenings. I attend BSI lunches every Wednesday and other BSI programming every Tuesday, plus other BSI events.

BSI events I’ve attended:

Other things I’ve done:

  • Take a practice GRE
  • Study for the GRE. Relearn special triangles.
  • Skype with my mentor, who is traveling in Australia
  • Discover there is a GRE English Subject Test. Freak out.
  • Make extensive use of Butler’s Interlibrary Loan system.
  • Play card games and Apples to Apples
  • Dinner with friends
  • Big Bang Theory
  • Wii night at the Apartment Village’s Dawghouse
  • Bingo night at the Dawghouse
  • Ballet, ballet
  • Explore Broad Ripple and taste truly excellent avocado eggs

But more than anything, I write, I read, I write some more. I discover that I shouldn’t really be longer than 25 pages and groan, because I’m set to pass that sooner or later. So I sit down and trim the excess wordiness, verbosity, prolixity, pleonasm, and garrulity. Research is what BSI is all about, and if you are good at self-motivation, this is definitely the program for you.

BSI, Weekend 2

The second weekend of BSI passed me by rather quickly. After my surprisingly negative reaction to the First Friday trip, the Keep Indianapolis Beautiful project was wonderful. A group of the BSI students along with the woman who is in charge of the program, plus another professor, worked with KIB on a community garden south of Indianapolis.

The KIB logo--click through for website

One group went to build a shade shelter. I’m still not entirely clear as to what that is, but I know it involved plywood and concrete, which is fairly intense. I stayed at the first site, with the vegetable garden. We weeded, cut and transported sod (and got very dirty in the process), and built a path (with step-stones and mulch) from a flowers/sitting-bench spot to the vegetable garden.

By the end, we were so grimy from the dirt blowing off the sod we ran into the sprinkler to clean off. Then we ate at a Jewish deli. Then it was home for a shower. I call that morning a success.

Later that night I had a potluck dinner with my roommate and another good friend, and we watched Sex and the City. I had never seen it before. It’s silly, but oh the clothes theclothestheclothes! Dinner was delicious–my friend found the best rosemary crackers. With soy cheese? I ate so many.

Green...

Sunday, I biked to church, saw my boyfriend who just arrived for summer classes, went to a ballet rehearsal, and had some truly excellent pizza. Monday it was back to BSI, and I finished skimming/reading Declan Kiberd’s Irish Classics. This is a massive book. I celebrated (preemptively) with ice cream, which was obtained by biking to the Safeway via the canal path.

I have decided I like Butler in the summer.

I’m not so cool

Sometimes, you want to go to Indy’s First Fridays event. Sometimes, open art galleries and talk and free humus and grapes are really cool. Sometimes witty banter, discussions of hipster, and mock battles are really cool as well. Sometimes, strolling down the sidewalks and admiring the architecture, the cupcakes in the bakery windows, and the random scupltures made out of tires is stupendously cool.

And sometimes, at the end of it all, you find yourself down in the dumps instead of uplifted, ready for a shower and sleep instead of a board game night, wanting to write about hybridized nations and postcolonialism rather than relax with friends.

Is this weird? Have I been spending too much time working, that I kind of, in a little way, prefer Anglo-Celtic writings to complimentary crackers, the quiet of an English paper finally unlocking itself beneath my fingers to the raucous wind in my hair, music in my ears, sun in my face? This is definitely not the usual sequencing, and I’m sure this pensive mood will pass.

Tomorrow we are working downtown with the Keep Indianapolis Beautiful project, which I’m looking forward to doing. This is a busy weekend, with several other events in the works. Here’s to a more energetic Saturday!

Off to chill with Jude the Obscure. That’s a good compromise, isn’t it?

No more promises

Okay, I just don’t feel like detailing the pen-returning adventure. Suffice it to say that there might have been a car chase, a reunion, and the return of inadvertently pilfered property. And ninja moves.

Dylan Thomas

This Sunday marks the end of the first week of BSI. Butler Summer Institute is a nine week program that allows students from all disciplines to conduct an independent study over the summer with a faculty mentor. Butler University provides housing and a stipend; there are also various lunches, informational sessions, and other get-togethers. I think we might get to do practice GREs. Next week is a research ethics module. Ugh. Much more fun will be the volunteering project in the works.

My first week looked a bit like this:

Monday–Move in. All day. BSI dinner in the evening.

Tuesday–Move in during the morning. Research in the afternoon. Discover UT kitchens doe not include microwaves.

Wednesday–Library in the morning. Lunch with the rest of the BSI participants. The library again. Give myself a ballet class. Research for the rest of the day.

Thursday–Research in the morning. Take a ballet class from a DVD with some other Butler dance majors who are on campus. Play the piano. Research for the rest of the day. Walk to a restaurant with my roommate and a friend for dinner. Research.

Friday–Research in the morning. Take a jazz class and give a ballet class with another Butler dance major. Play the piano. Research for the rest of the day.

James Joyce

Saturday–Visit the farmer’s market with my roommate. She has been spoiled by the farmer’s markets abroad but still managed to find some asperagus that wasn’t too expensive. Walk a bit in Broad Ripple. Do research and laundry. Bike to the nearby St. Thomas’ for Mass. Research.

 

Sunday–Breakfast in UT, then bike to Hubbard and Cravens’ coffee shop to research and finish annotating my last primary source! Write a blog post in stilted sentences.

Stilted, stilted. Time to delve into Anglo-Celtic literary tradition! Exclamation point not sarcastic. Quite sincere in my love of Dylan Thomas, even if James Joyce still requires many, many pretzels for moral support.

Still being fulfilled–tornadoes

The promises, I mean. Those pesky promises. The problem with assuring blog readers of future explanation comes with the actually-having-to-write-those-explanations bit. But we forge ahead:

Not driving in a car adventures: Indiana is stormy in the summer. Apparently.

Driving to a ballet rehearsal in Carmel, we were forced to seek shelter as a sudden storm blew in–one moment, the rain; the next, the upended rain barrel of God. Gravity twisted in more than three directions. Visibility was so bad it was hard to discern whether that gap in road was actually a side street into which we could turn.

We took shelter outside a synagogue. The windshield fogged up, and I had to call my dad to look up the number of the ballet studio so I could warn them of my probable tardiness.

So the rain passed and the windshield finally unfogged and after the ballet rehearsal, we tracked down a Japanese restaurant called Sakura which had been recommended to me by the Italian lady on my plane ride a few days previous. Spider rolls = good. Eating a bunch of wasabi plain = tears.

The courtyard at UT

This weather thing that I’ve discovered is normal for a Midwest summer. Yes? I’m not liking it so much. Now, wearing clothes and not absolutely melting in the outside air is lovely, especially after two decades of humid, oppressive Richmond summers. The brisk air as I eat my morning toast in the University Terrace courtyard? Divine.

The tornado sirens and the lightening and the calls warning us to seek shelter late in the night? Not so much a fan.

We are fortunate enough to be living in a basement apartment, so we did not have to go anywhere to seek shelter, except perhaps away from the larger windows in the living room. Nevertheless, I still harbored images of the car directly outside the window by my bed being slammed into the building and crushing me into something out of Flatland.

Despite the reassurances of my Midwestern roommate–who has actually survived a tornado–I might have hidden in an alcove in the living room until the lightning slowed.