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About Me:

My name is Olivia and I am a senior at Butler University. I spend most of my time in Lilly Hall as a BFA Dance Performance major. When not in rehearsal or ballet class, I write papers for my English Literature second major. In my super-abundant, never-lacking, this-is-highly-sarcastic spare time, I attempt to cook in my apartment kitchen, watch Youtube videos of ballet, knit sweaters that never seem to come to an end, and read books both silly and serious. If I could take any class at Butler just for kicks, I'd go for DiffyQ.

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Posts Tagged “busy”

Final Preparations

You see, these are the final preparations… because I’m a senior… preparing for finals… Oh dear.

I promise I’ll get to Coppélia performing was such an amazing experience, I’m having the hardest time putting it into words. This week is still pretty busy, though. What happens the week after Coppélia?

Many things.

  • Field trip to Congregation Beth-El Zedeck for my Midrash English class. Congregation Beth-El Zedeck
  • TURN IN my senior English essay. It’s not as good as I want it to be, but I’m done. Done. Done.
  • Plan for our last senior ballet technique final. The seniors always include some sort of skit or prank or something for their last ballet final. Last year, the senior class did a basketball-themed entrance and even had some of the basketball team show up in tutus! The year before was Olympic-themed with students each on one of the professor’s teams (Team Cholewa = Poland, since Professor Cholewa is from Poland). This year… you’ll have to wait and see, since it’s top secret.
  • Final projects, etc. I don’t like to think about those.

This week continues the whirlwind of my final month at Butler!

I’m so busy; this is why:

Things that happened:

Top 101 Students Banquet: We got a Butler Catholic Community picture with most of the BCC who were in attendance!

The Undergraduate Research Conference is coming! I have to prepare for two presentations, one on my BSI project, one on Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice. Of course, all this happens on the opening night of Coppélia.

Sigma Rho Initiation… We welcomed many, many new members into the dance service fraternity. And there are only five of us seniors left — even fewer than at the beginning of the year!

Dramatic poses in front of the fountain we are restoring as our class gift.

Right now, production week is happening, and I’m most likely in the theater. (This is most definitely a scheduled post.) As always, I have the very strong opinion that you should see Coppélia!

Why I’m not blogging much/a note on knitting

How, how, how am I already behind after having a full day to catch up? Next week I have all my normal homework due, plus I have to:

  • teach the center of a ballet class in my Teaching Analysis class (requires a lot of prep)
  • workshop the introduction to my BSI paper (which I am completely rewriting — sob! — which means this introduction is currently experiencing existence problems)
  • do a group project in French class (group projects take longer than solo projects, since you have to arrange meeting times, etc)
  • do a research project for my Theory and Philosophy of Dance class. The topic remains completely unspecified, which means this won’t be stressful, but I still have to do it.

Also, I’m going to Kansas City this Saturday to audition for Kansas City Ballet. (Just learned they’re doing A Midsummer Night’s Dream next season! Ah! I love.)

A side note:

I might just have finished this during the Super Bowl:

Better photo to come...

And perhaps will start this (I usually only knitting while traveling, since I can’t concentrate on most homework in airports):

Make Up Your Mind Racerback Tank from Julie Crawford

Looking for a Job

This winter break has been characterized, colored, and otherwise influenced by the one large event looming in my life: audition season.

Dance jobs are not like normal jobs. Companies hold large “cattle call” auditions from January-May, and you might not be notified until the late spring (and beyond) of any job offers. They are unstable and do not pay well. Contracts generally run between 25-40 weeks of the year — dancers must seek other work (often guesting so as to stay in shape) during the summer layoff.

I really want a dancing job.

As a graduating senior, I will travel to auditions (mostly in Chicago, but likely some as far as San Francisco)  every weekend, probably on Sundays. As soon as I’ve finished editing performance video, I’ll send my resumé/photos/DVD to other companies not offering auditions close to me or requesting materials.

Oh, yeah, I’ll take twenty credit-hours, complete my senior English essay, work with visiting repetiteur Kevin Irving to learn Nacho Duato’s Por Vos Muero, and bake at least one loaf of bread. (My sister gave me a World Breads cookbook for Christmas. I can’t let her down.)

Sophomore Dance Major

Of all my years, the sophomore dance schedule was the most challenging for me. Sophomore year is tough overall. I have the theory that it’s the weed-out year. If you are not happy taking so many dance classes, then a dancing career probably is not the right choice. I would want to learn that sort of thing about myself sooner rather than later.

When I was a sophomore I took:

  • Ballet Technique (2 semesters)
  • Modern Technique (2 semesters)
  • Jazz Technique (2 semesters)
  • Pointe (2 semesters)
  • Improvisation (2 semesters)
  • Spanish and Slavic Character (1 semester each)
  • Music Theory for Dance (2 semesters)
  • Choreography 1
  • Laban Movement Analysis
  • Piano
  • Voice class (2 semesters)
  • Butler Ballet (2 semesters)
  • Costuming class
  • GHS — Global and Historical Studies (2 semesters)
  • American Lit 1
  • Intro to Acting
  • Honors Class: A Brief History of Love and Friendship
  • British Lit 2

Basically, sophomore year was crazy. If you meet a sophomore dance major today, give him or her a hug. I’m told the School of Music is the same way. Sophomore year in the JCFA must be the equivalent of COPHS clusters. Maybe?

Laban class, unite!

 

I’m not so cool

Sometimes, you want to go to Indy’s First Fridays event. Sometimes, open art galleries and talk and free humus and grapes are really cool. Sometimes witty banter, discussions of hipster, and mock battles are really cool as well. Sometimes, strolling down the sidewalks and admiring the architecture, the cupcakes in the bakery windows, and the random scupltures made out of tires is stupendously cool.

And sometimes, at the end of it all, you find yourself down in the dumps instead of uplifted, ready for a shower and sleep instead of a board game night, wanting to write about hybridized nations and postcolonialism rather than relax with friends.

Is this weird? Have I been spending too much time working, that I kind of, in a little way, prefer Anglo-Celtic writings to complimentary crackers, the quiet of an English paper finally unlocking itself beneath my fingers to the raucous wind in my hair, music in my ears, sun in my face? This is definitely not the usual sequencing, and I’m sure this pensive mood will pass.

Tomorrow we are working downtown with the Keep Indianapolis Beautiful project, which I’m looking forward to doing. This is a busy weekend, with several other events in the works. Here’s to a more energetic Saturday!

Off to chill with Jude the Obscure. That’s a good compromise, isn’t it?

Catching up sans mustard

I am done! It is officially Thanksgiving Break, and I survived last week.

Monday: Irish Lit paper due. Dance history abstract due. Full run-through of The Nutcracker. Butler Catholic Community meeting. Done, done, done, and done. Physics.

Clowes Hall

Tuesday: The Nutcracker run-through. Science lab. Attending a concert at Clowes to see my two jazz-musician friends play = awesome. Sigma Rho Delta meeting (albeit briefly, as the concert ended after the start of Sigma Rho). Physics.

Wednesday: The Nutcracker. (Do you notice a theme here?) Frantic studying for the massive physics test. And–oh yeah– more physics.

Thursday: Physics test. Doomdoomdoom. And The Nutcracker. Frantic reading for my Irish Lit class. Speaking of Irish Lit, I got my paper back and extremely surprised to find that some of the things I thought were awful could, with some refinement, actually fit into my convoluted thesis. Much excitement ensued.

Around 11:15 pm, I enjoyed watched all the students stream off campus to see the Harry Potter movie, though I regretfully remained in order to sleep in order to dance safely the next day. However, I saw fellow-blogger Justin looking quite spiffy in his purple Dumbledore robes and cotton-ball beard.

Physics produced a mixed reaction. I felt like I hit most of the key concepts in the two problems–for any interested: the law of conservation of momentum, the law of conservation of energy, the work-energy theorem, projectile motion, force diagrams, forces like tension and friction, uniform circular motion, and collisions–but I didn’t actually get a concrete answer for the last part of the last problem.

More infuriating than a simply inability to finish was that fact that, by the end of ballet class, the idea that was previously slow to come to me had made its way into my brain: the equation for time down. Duuuuh. Also, I realized that the distance one would travel around the rim of half a circle is in fact pi*r, not 2*pi*r.

Friday: FRIDAY! I had nothing due. The most pressing duty on my list was laundry. I spent my breaks yesterday compiling a Thanksgiving Break playlist for a CD. I ate a pumpkin muffin. I watched my physics professor demonstrate gyroscopic motion by standing on a stool and letting the torques (or something…) from the gyroscope make him rotate around. Best physics class ever. I really wanted to try the gyroscope out on my own. Maybe next time.

This break is off to a fabulous beginning, and I’ll looking forward to the rest of the week! I do have a bunch of homework to do, but, you know, sleeping will occur.

Off to get some more tea…

Since I been gone

Looking at my post list, I see it’s been five days since I’ve released a new blog! Sorry about that. This past week has been super busy. Here are some of my excuses:

I saw the Paul Taylor Dance Company quite some time ago, so perhaps it does not quite count as an excuse. I harbored mixed feelings about the program, but I adored “Esplanade,” one of great masterworks of the twentieth century. The video below is from the beginning of the last, crazy section. I also enjoyed seeing the solo the Butler dance department’s modern teacher Susan McGuire originated in “Dust.”
YouTube Preview Image

Dancer Thanksgiving potluck. My roommate and I brought apple-cranberry bread. And when I say “my roommate and I,” I mean I provided some of the ingredients and got out the bread pan. Then I watched my dancer roommate and my troublesome roommate make it together. Moral support, ya know?

Trader Joe's apple bread mix with added, homemade, cranberry sauce

Nutcracker Studio Dress rehearsal on Saturday! Studio Dress is when the department first runs the entire production in order, in costume, in the largest studio. After Studio Dress comes a week of production run-throughs in that same studio (Studio 310). Then comes Thanksgiving Break. Then comes production week in the theater. The performances are fast approaching.

Attending the Jazz Combos performance in the campus Starbucks to see my two jazz-musician friends. One plays the French horn; the other, the bass. Coolness. Would anyone like a post on French horn majors or jazz minors?

Writing the introduction and outline to my dance history paper on Irish dancing
Writing and writing and writing my Irish Lit paper. I finally finished the rough draft last night–before 11 pm! My friend gave me a CD and said I couldn’t listen to it until I was finished with the paper. How’s that for motivation? To be completely honest, I am rather disappointed with the result, since my thesis is pretty convoluted and not incredibly dependent on my readings of Translations. Oh well. It’s done for now, and I can fix it over Thanksgiving Break. I turned the paper in earlier today–all 21.5 pages!

Writing my Irish Lit paper--do you like my stack of sources?

Mastering the art of the Rubik’s cube. I will defeat you! (And I have, just not without the aid of a cheat sheet once I get to the final layer. I confuse the algorithms for reorienting the corners with those for reorienting the sides: R2 B2, R F R’, B2 R F’ R is for corners and R2 U’, F B’, R2, B F’, U’ R2 is for the sides. Maybe if I type it enough times I’ll remember this. This is clearly the top priority right now.)

I have a massive physics test on Thursday. Like, with enough surface area such that one can’t ignore air resistance massive. Everyone studying for the past week massive. A friend’s friend telling me this test made her abandon her dream of becoming an engineer massive. (Said friend is now a sixth grade math teacher.) Now my Irish Lit paper is done for the next few days, I can turn all my attention to studying for this test.

Oh yeah. I have a bunch of reading for Irish Lit, too. Whoops.

Scheduling, part VI

I recently registered for my sixth semester of classes. That’s right. The sixth. I will be a senior before I know it, and that is terrifying.

Registration for spring classes... just when the leaves fall and it gets really cold.

Registration, when you are enrolled as student, goes by credit hour, so I got to enroll at 3:30 pm on the first day of registration. When I was a freshman, I had to register quite late, since enrollment periods open for about two weeks. I’m only a junior, but I had some credit from AP tests I took in high school, and since I’m in the Butler honors college, I get twenty extra “ghost” credit hours added to my registration queuing total as a sort of perk. Anyway. The point being that I am all set for spring semester… which will also be terrifying, since I’m taking three English classes.

I thought for a long time that finishing an English major (the literature track) would be impossible, but I have since met with the head of Butler’s English Department, and I have new hope. I am way behind, however, and this spring is going to be rough. I’m taking twenty-one credit hours (which means I’ll have to pay for the extra credit hour I’m taking, since the limit for students with primary majors in the JCFA is 20 credit hours a semester). Nine of those hours are English classes. One of those English classes will go on my transcript as an internship, since I’m acting as a sort of TA for the department head’s EN 185 class.

(EN 185 is Intro to the Discipline of English. It’s the first class you take towards an English major. I’ll be responsible for all the work the other students do, plus reading literary criticism on the works, offering help with essay writing and revision, writing longer/more in-depth papers, and presenting several research projects to the class.)

I am going to be so busy. Wish me luck!

The classes I’m taking in the spring:

  • Ballet technique
  • Modern technique
  • Pointe technique
  • Pas de deux
  • Variations
  • Butler Ballet (rehearsal period)
  • Dance history 2
  • Choreography 2
  • Literature of the American Renaissance
  • Romanticism
  • Intro to the Discipline of English

(gulp)

In mourning: NaNoWriMo

I have mentioned Nanowrimo. I can’t explain it again. I’m too heart-broken.

I have decided against participating in National Novel Writing Month this year: I have too much to do with my Irish Lit class’ huge paper (which I am started to panic about a wee bit). This kills me, as my little sister is doing it, and I’ve done it for the past four years, and… and…. Grrr. I’ve dubbed this November NaPaWriMo: National Paper Writing Month. The idea is that I write a page and a half of my Irish Lit paper each day. My progress so far? Negligible.

Still, I couldn’t resist writing a little before breakfast this Monday, on November 1. For your reading pleasure, my completely unedited, auspicious, to-be-unfulfilled Nanowrimo. Call it a tribute to a Nano novel unwritten. Don’t judge. I hadn’t had caffeine yet.

The ancient Peruvians were known far and wide for their hot air balloons. This is a little known fact nowadays, but in their time they were quite famous. Ballooning can be quite technical; ballooning manufacture can be quite complicated. Above all, ballooning requires no small measure of bravery: A single man, aloft in the sky, at the mercy of the winds, with only ballast and fuel supply to determine his way. Ballooning requires a certain, shall we say, sensitivity. Once up, you cannot push off and steer too much. You have only the power to influence the forces already acting on her. Ballooning is above all learning to cope with what you have, learning to go with the air flow, as it were.

That is what our hero was telling himself as he floated high above the trees of his hometown in a stolen air balloon with very little ballast. It had been a quick getaway; he had not had time to outfit his chosen ship properly with sand. Sand was heavy. Very, unexpectedly heavy, even. A man on the run is not going to place much sand in a stolen hot air balloon. A man on the run with a rather, shall we say, lofty figure, is not going to stop and check over each supply of ballast.

He had made a quick getaway, at least. Little ballast, a blast from the fuel flare, and he was up above the canopy cover of his hometown, floating free as a bird.

Freer even, since he had not idea how he was going to descend.