Ginkgo, Maidenhair tree   (Ginkgo biloba)

Non-native, introduced

A primitive tree native to Asia, this tree has distinctive fan-shaped leaves with parallel veins and a notch in the tip.  Male and female flowers are borne on separate trees.  The sexual system is controlled by X and Y chromosomes, common in animals but rare in plants.  Male trees are usually planted because fruits produced by females are reported to smell like rancid butter. The leaves turn golden yellow in the fall and often fall in a single day if the tree is not protected by a building.

To learn more about Ginkgo, visit its profile at the USDA Plants Database

 
The leaves of the Ginkgo tree turn golden yellow in the fall and often fall in a single day if the tree is not protected by a building.  The picture on the left shows the ginko leaves as they are just beginning to turn gold on the edges.  The picture on the right was taken approximately 10 days later.