Center for Faith and Vocation

Religion Seminar Series

Religion and Reconciliation in Global Perspective , 2014-2015

Presented by Butler University Seminar on Religion and World Civilization and The Desmond Tutu Center for Peace, Global Justice, and Reconciliation

Five Public Seminars

Seminars meet from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. in the location specified for each event. Sessions take place this academic year at Butler University, 4600 Sunset Avenue, as well as on the campus of neighboring Christian Theological Seminary, 1000 W. 42nd Street, Indianapolis, Indiana. Admission is free. No tickets are required.

View the brochure for this year's series.

THE RISKS OF RECONCILIATION

Tuesday, September, 23, 2014, 7:00 p.m.

Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts, Butler University

In pious portrayals of the subject, the risks and challenges of reconciliation are often left out of the picture, as is the
question: Is it worth it? A frank discussion of the theological roots of reconciliation work will inaugurate our series as we explore the hazards of pursuing the politics of reconciliation in our time.

Keynote speaker

BoesakAllan Aubrey Boesak directs the Desmond Tutu Center for Peace, Global Justice, and Reconciliation, a joint project of Butler University and Christian Theological Seminary. He teaches at both schools. A native of South Africa, Boesak is a theologian and political activist, who helped form religious opposition to apartheid in South Africa during the 1980s and lead reconciliation efforts there in the 1990s. He is ordained in the Dutch Reformed Church and has held leadership positions in Reformed Church organizations worldwide.

Respondent

Robin TurnerRobin Turner is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Butler University, where her teaching and research focus on state-society relations and political economy in southern Africa.

DOES RECONCILIATION ACTUALLY HAPPEN?

Tuesday, October, 28, 2014, 7:00 p.m.

Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts, Butler University

More than two decades after the end of apartheid in South Africa, this session will explore the prospects of
reconciliation. The focus will be on ethnic and religious conflicts, which impede the development of civil society in South Africa and other parts of Africa today. 

Keynote speaker

Charles -Villa -VicencioCharles Villa-Vicencio is a Visiting Professor of the Conflict Resolution Program of Georgetown University. A theologian and former Methodist minister, Villa-Vincencio focues his research and activism on transitional justice and reconciliation. From 1996 to 1998, he served as National Research Director of South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

Respondent

BoesakAllan Aubrey Boesak directs the Desmond Tutu Center for Peace, Global Justice, and Reconciliation, a joint project of Butler University and Christian Theological Seminary.

RECONCILIATION IN ISLAMIC THOUGHT AND PRACTICE

Tuesday, January 27, 2015, 7:00 p.m.

Shelton Auditorium, Christian Theological Seminary

Speakers

HermansenMarcia Hermansen directs the Islamic World Studies Program and is a Professor in Theology at Loyola University, Chicago, where she teaches courses in Islamic studies and the academic study of religion. Her books includeMuslima Theology: The Voices of Muslim Women Theologians(forthcoming) andShah Wali Allah's Treatises on Islamic Law(Fons Vitae, 2010).

MoosaEbrahim Moosa is Professor of Islamic Studies in the Department of History and the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame. A native of South Africa, Moosa is a leading scholar of Muslim thought and his research and teaching cover Islamic law, history, ethics, and theology. His books includeGhazali and the Poetics of Imagination(Oxford, 2006) andRevival and Reform In Islam(Oneworld, 1999). 

TRUTH AND RECONCILIATION WITH NATIVE AMERICA

Tuesday, February 24, 2015, 7:00 p.m.

Shelton Auditorium, Christian Theological Seminary

Truth and reconciliation commissions are best known outside of the United States. In North America, Maine is the first place where the process is being carried out among five Native American communities and the state's child welfare
agencies. The session will explore this work in Maine and insights it offers about other historic divisions in North America.

Speakers

Esther -AtteanEsther Attean co-directs Maine Wabanaki REACH (Reconciliation, Engagement, Advocacy, Change, and Healing) and is Co-Founder of the Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission process. She is a Passamaquoddy tribal citizen of the Wabanaki.

Denise -AltvaterDenise Altvater works for the American Friends Service Committee as Director of the Wabanaki Youth Program. She is Co-Founder of the Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission process and is a Passamaquoddy tribal citizen of the Wabanaki.

Respondent

MLevySiobhán McEvoy-Levy is an Associate Professor and Chair of Political Science at Butler University. Her teaching and research include peace and conflict studies around the world, including in Israel and the Palestinian territories, in Ireland, and in Maine.

RUSSIA AND UKRAINE: IS RECONCILIATION POSSIBLE?

Tuesday, March 17, 2015, 7:00 p.m.

Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts, Butler University

The Ukrainian revolution of 2014 and Russia's response to it have disrupted the longstanding ties of religion and culture connecting the two nations. What, if anything, can the truth and reconciliation concept offer Russians and Ukrainians who seek to repair their relationship?

Keynote speaker

SigovKonstantin Sigov is Director of Spirit and Letter Publishers in Kiev, Ukraine, and also teaches philosophy and religion at the National University of Kiev-Mohyla Academy. An Orthodox Christian layman, Sigov has long played a leading role in promoting ecumenical and interreligious relationships in Ukraine.

Respondent

GlazovElena Glazov-Corrigan is an Associate Professor of Russian Literature at Emory University in Atlanta. A native of Moscow and a Roman Catholic, she is an experienced interpreter of Russian culture.

Browse brochures from previous years.