Faculty Development

Archive of Past Years' Faculty Events

2012-2013 ~ Show Events

Brown Bag Series, Faculty Research, Scholarship and Creative Work Presentation
Gautam Rao, Visual Arts: "Unblocked"
Monday, April 22, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111)
A conversation about inspiration and the creative process. Led by Gautam Rao.

Click  here  to view the poster for this session.

Faculty Food for Thought: "Integrating Media into the Curriculum: A Dialogue about Resources and Services"
Wednesday, April 10, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111)
VHS to DVD to streaming: which technologies are you using to integrate video into the curriculum, and with what success? Join the discussion with panelists Julianne Miranda from the Center for Academic Technology, Joe Indiano from Information Technology, and Julie Miller and Josh Petrusa from Butler Libraries. The panel will provide a brief overview of the current resources and services available to Butler faculty, followed by an open conversation with faculty about your needs now and in the future with regard to video in the classroom (face to face or online). Lunch tickets to The Market Place will be provided. So that we can best be prepared, please RSVP by clicking here.

BIRS Workshop: "Building Budgets for Grant Proposals"
Wednesday, April 10, 3-4 p.m., JH048
At this workshop, you will learn the different components of a grant budget, and related university policies. Please click here to RSVP to Dana Ohren.

Brown Bag Series, Faculty Research, Scholarship and Creative Work Presentation
Robin Turner, Political Science:
"Traditional, Modern, Accountable? Navigating Dual Governance in Rural South Africa"
Monday, April 8, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111)
Nearly two decades after South Africa's democratization, questions of tradition and modernity, representation and accountability continue to trouble rural localities. Governance remains fragmented by place and by race despite the extension of the franchise to all adult citizens as millions of black South Africans remain dually subject to so-called traditional leaders - kings, queens, chiefs, and headmen - and to "modern" government officials - municipal councilors, provincial premiers, and national government officials. While most citizens experience the formally democratic, supposedly modern governance system established in the 1996 Constitution, 28% of South Africans lived in places with traditional leaders in 2011. In this presentation, Robin Turner will discuss how rural people have pursued community development and sought effective, accountable governance in this context. Drawing from extensive field research in four rural localities, this presentation will explore the potential and limitations of local initiative by South African citizen-subjects in the absence of radical reforms to traditional institutions. Click here to view the poster for this session. No RSVP required. Light refreshments will be provided.

Brown Bag Series, Faculty Research, Scholarship and Creative Work Presentation
ark Rademacher, Strategic Communication:
"Get Rich or Die Buying: The Travails of the Working Class Auction Bidder"
Wednesday, March 20, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111)
Mark Rademacher, Strategic Communication, will examine A&E Network's popular reality TV (RTV) program "Storage Wars," and suggests that its documentation of the market-based social practices of a group of working class, professional auction bidders harnesses and celebrates the dramatic and festive aspects of a modern day treasure hunt to create an engaging and entertaining RTV program. This mediated depiction of auction culture, however, generates a contradictory narrative regarding the role of working class cultural capital and alternative marketing systems, such as auctions within a consumer culture. He argues "Storage Wars'" depiction of bidders' cultural capital and consumption practices illustrates the subtle nature in which consumption creates and legitimates social distinctions within a neoliberal consumer culture. Specifically, the narrative constructs working class cultural capital and consumption practices in an alternative marketing system as reflective of, and in contrast to, those present in more commonly experienced marketing systems. Ultimately, this narrative framing legitimates rather than challenges capitalist ideology and existing class-based status hierarchies, consequently contributing to the transformation of society's understanding of alternative marketing systems within neoliberal consumer culture. Click here to view the poster for this session. 

Brown Bag Series, Faculty Research, Scholarship and Creative Work Presentation
Elizabeth Mix, Art History, "Bio Art and the Cabinet of Curiosities in The Netherlands"
Monday, March 4, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111)
Contemporary Dutch artist Dolf Veenvliet is the creator of Entoforms(future fossils based on insect forms). There are two iterations of the work - digital video captures the generative process of creation using two specifically Dutch computer programs: the open-source software Blender (for 3-D modeling) and Python (a flexible scripting language). Select Entoformspecimens are printed as small sculptures via stereo-lithography (a process originally developed for industrial design prototyping), and then are pinned and placed in museum-quality archival boxes. Veenvliet's work bridges disciplines: science and art; art and technology; art and design; design and popular culture. Join Elizabeth Mix (Art History) as she explains how Veenvliet's work can be categorized as New Media, Bio Art, and Generative Art, and identifies significant connections between Veenvliet's work and the tradition of the Cabinet of Curiosities in The Netherlands as exemplified by the 17th-century collections of Rembrandt van Rijn, Levin Vincent, Albertus Seba, and Haarlem's Teylers Museum. Click here to view the poster for this session. 

BIRS Workshop: "Developing Proposals for Grants and Fellowships"
Thursday, February 28, 10-11 a.m., JH048
or Friday, March 8, 3-4 p.m., JH048
At this workshop, you'll learn about best practices for composing the narrative portions of grant proposals, including the project summary, goals and objectives, methodology, assessment and more. Special attention will be paid to the differences between research and programmatic proposals. The same material will be covered at each session. Please click here to RSVP to Dana Ohren, indicating which session you plan to attend.

Faculty Food for Thought: "Sabbatical Teaching Opportunity in the UK"
Tuesday, February 26, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111)
Harlaxton College, the British Campus of the University of Evansville, is now accepting nominations for visiting faculty for the 2014-15 academic year. Since 1971, Harlaxton College has served as a study abroad site offering a core curriculum in British Studies, supplemented by courses from visiting U.S. faculty, all in an historic English manor house in the East Midlands. As an official Harlaxton partner, Butler may nominate a professor for a one-semester teaching appointment. Earl Kirk, Director of Study Abroad at the University of Evansville will join us for this Faculty Food for Thought session to explain the application process. Lunch tickets to The Market Place will be provided. So that we can best be prepared, please send your RSVP to Rebecca DeGrazia by clicking here.

New Faculty Orientation: "Shared Governance: what it is and how you can be involved"
Thursday, February 21, noon-1 p.m., JH186 (please note the change in location)
Join representatives from Faculty Senate for a conversation about how governance works at Butler. We'll go over committee structure, talk about how decisions get made, discuss how the election or appointment process works, and suggest ways for you to get involved. Lunch will be provided.

Brown Bag Series, Faculty Research, Scholarship and Creative Work Presentation
Ulf Goebel, Honors Program: "Into That Good Night: Notes to the Enigma of Origin"
Wednesday, February 13, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111)
Ulf Goebel, Honors Program, will read from "Into That Good Night: Notes to the Enigma of Origin" (a work in progress) documenting his experiences as a young boy who experienced the devastating bombings in Dresden. In addition, he will recite a poem he wrote in response to 2009-10's Sunset Project - "a celebration of the beauties of a firestorm mimicking a spectacular sunset." Click here to view the poster and abstract for this session. No RSVP required. Light refreshments will be provided.

BIRS Workshop: "Applying for External Grants"
Tuesday, February 5, 3-4 p.m., JH048
or Friday, February 15, 2-3 p.m., JH048
Come learn about the process of applying for external grants from start to finish. Topics covered will include how to choose appropriate funding sources, how to put together the application components, what to expect of the review process, and the University guidelines for seeking external funding. The same material will be covered at each session. Please click here to RSVP to Dana Ohren, indicating which session you'd like to attend.

New Faculty Orientation: "Getting Involved with Interdisciplinary Programs and Honors"
Thursday, February 7, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111)
Join us for a conversation with the Interdisciplinary Program Directors and Amy Elson, Program Coordinator for the Honors Program. Meet in the UClub (south of The Market Place in Atherton Union) - lunch coupons to The Market Place will be provided.

Brown Bag Series, Faculty Research, Scholarship and Creative Work Presentation
Chad Bauman, Philosophy and Religion: "Conversion and Hindu-Christian Conflict"
Wednesday, February 6, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111)
Chad Bauman (Religious Studies) will present his research on Hindu-Christian conflict and violence in contemporary India. Though Christians have lived in India since at least the 4th century, they have been accused by some Hindus, since the late colonial period, of adhering to a foreign and anti-national faith, peddled unscrupulously through the evangelical use of "force, fraud, and allurement." The accusations fuel and are informed by a number of intriguing and prominent public debates about the limits and desirability (for India) of western-style governance, about what "freedom of religion" should entail, about whether "intolerant" (read: evangelical) religions can be tolerated, and even about the nature of religion itself. These debates take place not only in the press and among intellectuals and politicians, but also increasingly, through the medium of interreligious riots. Click here to view the poster. No RSVP required. Light refreshments will be provided.

Brown Bag Series, Faculty Research, Scholarship and Creative Work Presentation
Liliana Torres-Goens, MLLC: "Using Panopto to Strengthen Student Confidence in Oral Language Classes"
Thursday, January 24, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111)
Join us for a conversation with Liliana Torres-Goens, where she will share her success stories using Panopto in the classroom and beyond. Liliana has successfully been using Panopto in her Spanish Conversation class, and has found it to be a valuable tool, providing her students with a sense of self-confidence in the use of their oral skills. Students are creators and viewers of their own work. Oral presentations are done using this instructional method which allows them to critique their own work, as well as the work of their peers.  A lot of class time is saved from doing oral activities online and the communication process is more productive. Self-evaluations on their performances are encouraged. Click here to view the poster; no RSVP required. Light refreshments will be provided.

New Faculty Orientation: "Advising: What works!"
Thursday, January 17, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111)
Colleagues will share strategies on how to be an effective advisor, and ways you can be involved in the early registration process for incoming students. Meet in the UClub (south of The Market Place in Atherton Union) - lunch coupons to The Market Place will be provided.

Moodle-Palooza!
Wednesday, January 9 - various times, starting at 9 a.m. and ending at 4 p.m.
JH041, JH043, JH048
Celebrate the start of a new year and Butler University's new Learning Management System (LMS), Moodle.  The comprehensive faculty development program and the Center for Academic Technology invite you to join us for workshops throughout the day.

Refreshments and lunch will be provided. Click here to learn more and to RSVP for any of the sessions.

"BIRS Coffee Hour": Stop by to talk about grants - coffee is on us!
Thursday, December 6, 10-11 a.m., Starbucks
Click here for more information.

Brown Bag Series, Faculty Research, Scholarship and Creative Work Presentation
Matt Pivec, Music, along with the Butler University Jazz Ensemble: "The Radiohead Jazz Project"
Wednesday, December 5, 12:15-1:15 p.m., LH112
The English rock band Radiohead, which formed in 1985, has the rare distinction of obtaining both significant commercial success and critical acclaim. The band's sound has continually evolved throughout the years, including at various points, folk, electronic, minimalist, and many other influences. Consequently, Radiohead's expressive pallet far exceeds most bands with that degree of commercial success. In 2011, a coalition of jazz arrangers who, like Radiohead, are recognized for their ability to incorporate new musical styles into their voice, created the Radiohead Jazz Project. This Brown Bag session focuses on the realization of their efforts through four Radiohead works for jazz ensemble. Matt Pivec will lead a discussion of the relevant influences and features of each piece, followed by a full performance by the Butler University Jazz Ensemble 1.

Click here to view a poster for this session. 

New Faculty Orientation: "Faculty Activity Reports"
Thursday, November 29, noon-1 p.m., AU111
An important way to document achievements each year is the Faculty Activity Report (FAR). This session introduces the FAR, and provides suggestions on how to best complete it. Meet in the UClub (south of The Market Place in Atherton Union) - lunch coupons to The Market Place will be provided beginning at 11:45 a.m.

"Teaching in the Era of Coursera"
Wednesday, November 28, noon-1 p.m., AU111 (UClub)
Help, the MOOCs are coming! Actually, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are already here. Harvard MIT, and UC-Berkeley sponsor edX. Sixteen universities (including Stanford, Johns Hopkins, and Georgia Tech) contribute to Coursera. Sebastian Thrun of Stanford University founded Udacityand, last fall, 160,000 people from 190 countries signed up for his artificial intelligence course. Squeezed from below by for-profit schools and from above by the elite universities, we risk becoming the baloney in a baloney sandwich. Bob Dale, psychology, will discuss our options. Lunch tickets to The Market Place will be provided. Please RSVP by clicking here.

"BIRS Coffee Hour": Stop by to talk about grants - coffee is on us!
Tuesday, November 27, 9-10 a.m., Starbucks
Click here for more information.

Brown Bag Series, Faculty Research, Scholarship and Creative Work Presentations
Tuesday, November 27, noon-1 p.m., AU111 (UClub)
Margaretha Geertsema-Sligh, Journalism: "Media, Politics and Polygamy in South Africa"
In South Africa, polygamy is legal for cultural groups who have traditionally practiced this form of marriage. It entered the public discourse primarily through the marriages of Jacob Zuma, president of South Africa and leader of the African National Congress, and has drawn much attention from the local (and international) news media since he became deputy president in June 1999. Potential contradictions between the traditional and the modern in Zuma's life present rich material for a case study on media, culture, politics and gender in South Africa. Margaretha Geertsema-Sligh will examine the reaction of the South African news media to Jacob Zuma's polygamy and the implications for gender equality.

Click here to view a poster for this session.

Online Faculty Activity Report (FAR) Information Sessions
Monday, November 19, 1:30-2:30, PB150
Thursday, November 29, 2:30-3:30, LH141
Wednesday, December 12, 3-4 p.m., GH105
Tuesday, December 18, 11-noon, JH238
Interested in having the option to complete your Faculty Activity Report online? Would you like to fill in drop-down menus for each section and be able to save the document and have it stored in the cloud? Come to one of the information sessions to learn how you can complete your FAR online this year. Bring a laptop/tablet with you and you can log in and be part of the focus group for the online FAR.

To accommodate busy schedules, we will offer four sessions - each covering the same information.

"Building Budgets for Grant Proposals"
Thursday, November 15, 2-3 p.m., JH048
Click here for more information. Please RSVP by clicking here.

"Seeing Cuba with Our Own Eyes" reception
Tuesday, November 13, 4-5:30 p.m., Collaborative Learning Space of the Irwin Library
Set to coincide with international week activities, all members of the Butler community are invited to this photo exhibit reception to meet students and faculty who traveled to Cuba last summer as part of specialized GHS and faculty development programs. Light refreshments will be provided.

The photo exhibit runs through November 23 in the Collaborative Learning Space of the Irwin Library.

"BU's Global Initiatives: Funding Opportunities/Outcomes,"
Tuesday, November 13, noon-1 p.m., AU111 (UClub)
Butler's Global Initiative Grants program enables several faculty members each year to undertake activities to enhance their foreign language skills, deepen their knowledge about other world regions or countries, internationalize specific courses, and make scouting trips to foreign destinations where they plan to lead short-term study programs for Butler students. In this panel discussion, faculty members and Global Initiative Grant recipients Bob Bennett, Ann Savage, Margaretha Geertsema-Sligh, and Jeff Gillespie will describe their projects and assess the impact their experiences will have on their teaching and scholarship. Lunch tickets to The Market Place will be provided. Please RSVP by clicking here.

New Faculty Orientation: "Course Evaluations,"
Thursday, November 8, noon-1 p.m., AU111 (UClub)
As the end of the semester approaches, join us to talk about how course evaluations are administered at Butler and how you can best evaluate your classes. Meet in the University Club (south of The Market Place in Atherton Union). Lunch tickets to The Market Place will be provided.

Brown Bag Series, Faculty Research, Scholarship and Creative Work Presentations
Wednesday, November 7, noon-1 p.m., AU111 (UClub)
Stacy O'Reilly, Chemistry: "And Remind Me Again Why We Make Them Do Lab?"
Hands-on laboratory work has long been incorporated into the chemistry curriculum. These labs are often characterized by a "cookbook" approach. Students go through the specific motions of the laboratory procedure with little understanding of the process. In 2008, faculty members John Esteb, LuAnne McNulty, Stacy O'Reilly, and Anne Wilson, department of chemistry, were awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation to explore how giving meaning to the physical processes of the laboratory would impact student learning and retention of material.

Click here to view a poster for this session.

No RSVP required. Light refreshments and beverages will be provided.

Cuba: A Student and Faculty Photo Exhibition
October 15-November 23, Collaborative Learning Space in Irwin Library
This engaging photo exhibition will showcase images taken by Butler students and faculty who traveled to Cuba in spring 2012.

Be sure to also mark your calendar for an upcoming reception, being held on the afternoon of Tuesday, November 13, from 4:00-5:30 p.m. in the Irwin Library to coincide with International Education Week.

BIRS Grant Workshop
"Demystifying the Grant Review Process"
Tuesday, November 6, 12-1:30 p.m., AU326 - lunch provided

At this panel discussion, Butler faculty members who have served as reviewers for external grant programs, including several federal and local agencies, will give the insider's perspective on the grant review process. Topics will include common criteria used to evaluate applications, review panel dynamics, and the relationship between the program officer and review panel. Lunch will be provided. So that we can best be prepared, please RSVP to Dana Ohren by clicking here.

BIRS Grant Workshop
"Developing Proposals for Grants and Fellowships"
Wednesday, October 31, 1-2 p.m., JH048
Learn about best practices for composing the narrative portions of grant and fellowship proposals, including the project summary, goals and objectives, methodology, assessment and more. Special attention will be given to the differences between research and programmatic proposals. Light refreshments provided. Please RSVP to Dana Ohren by clicking here.

Brown Bag Series, Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentation
Tiberiu Popa, Philosophy: "Scientific Method and the Dawn of Medicine"

Wednesday, October 31, noon-1 p.m., AU111 (UClub)
Hippocrates and his followers are remembered today mostly for the famous oath and for their compassionate attitude towards the fragility of human condition. Yet, the writings that constitute the Hippocratic Corpus are perhaps even more remarkable for their contribution to the emergence of science. A few wildly fanciful assumptions notwithstanding, many of those works look surprisingly modern in their rational approach, emphasizing careful observation of the patients' condition, of the evolution of diseases, and the environments that seemed to cause epidemics. The Hippocratics also attempted to build a theoretical framework for their practice, by relying on casual explanations and quasi-laws governing human physiology. In this presentation, Tiberiu Popa will share a number of passages that give the measure of those physicians' extraordinary originality.

Click here to view a poster for this presentation.

No RSVP required. Beverages and snacks provided; please feel free to bring your lunch.

Brown Bag Series, Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentation
Su-Mei Ooi, Political Science: "The Transnational Protection Regime and Democratization in Taiwan and Singapore"
Monday, October 22, noon-1 p.m., AU111 (UClub)
The Pacific Asian region has been a constant source of fascination for political scientists. Rising from the ashes of postwar devastation and uncertainty, the "little dragon" economies of Taiwan and Singapore transformed themselves into economic powerhouses within 3 decades. Until the spirit of democracy swept through Asia in the latter part of the 1980s, promising to transform the political landscape of the region, democratic prospects in Taiwan and Singapore seemed uncertain however. In this Brown Bag presentation, Su-Mei Ooi will explain the complexities of democratic development in Taiwan and Singapore, the importance of comprehending its international dimensions, and the significance of these two case studies for our understanding of democratization.

Click here to view a poster, and to read the full abstract, for this presentation.

No RSVP required. Beverages and snacks provided; please feel free to bring your lunch.

Center for Academic Technology: "Fall Break Intro to Moodle Training Sessions"
Thursday, October 11, 10 a.m.-noon, JH048
or Friday, October 12, 2 p.m.-4 p.m., JH048
Sticking around for fall break and interested in learning about Moodle? Intro to Moodle is a 2-hour workshop that introduces you to Moodle, Butler's new Learning Management System. This session will guide users through Moodle's basic features for both courses and organizations. In this session, you will 1) learn how to manually move files from Blackboard to Moodle; 2) navigate, customize, and add content to courses and organizations; 3) be introduced to the course activities available in Moodle.

To register for this session, and other sessions offered by the Center for Academic Technology, please visit: http://bucat.eventbrite.com.

BIRS Coffee Hour
Wednesday, October 10, 4-5 p.m., Starbucks
Do you have questions about grants, intellectual property issues or compliance regulations? BIRS is hosting monthly coffee hours at Starbucks in Atherton Union. Come let them know what is on your mind and have a cup of coffee on BIRS. Visit http://www.butler.edu/research-scholarship/calendar/ for information on other upcoming BIRS workshops and opportunities.

Faculty Food for Thought: "Inspiring Innovation and the Entrepreneurial Mindset Across the Curriculum"
Tuesday, October 9, noon-1 p.m., AU111 (UClub)
Each of our Butler colleges take creative and innovative paths to developing some of the best future leaders, citizens, change agents, and contributors to society in both non-profit and profit ventures - whether in the arts, engineering, life sciences, or business. We invite you to share your innovative and entrepreneurially natured projects…from farms to art, from medicine to machines…from education to commercial products and services.What are your best practices on motivating students using the power and drive of the entrepreneurial mindset and including creativity and innovation in the classroom? What are some of the trends of innovation and entrepreneurial development in your areas? What about applying entrepreneurial decision-making skills to a specific discipline, such as preparing pharmacy students to run their practice, or helping music students develop a vibrant and successful freelance career?Are their opportunities for diverse students across disciplines to work together and build their innovation capacity? Join us for lunch and conversation led byStephanie Fernhaber(Management) andDenise Williams(Management) and share your best practices on innovation and the entrepreneurial mindset across the curriculum. Resources and examples will be shared. Lunch coupons to The Market Place will be provided. 

Brown Bag Series, Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentations
Doug Spaniol, Music: "Bassooner or Later: 'New' Nineteenth Century Bassoon Music"
Tuesday, October 2, noon-1 p.m., AU111 (UClub)
Julius Weissenborn served as principal bassoon of the Gewandhaus Orchestra and was the first bassoon instructor at the conservatoire in Leipzig. He also enjoyed a multi-faceted career as a composer, conductor and copyist. To this day, his pedagogical works are among the most widely used by bassoon students and teachers. However, his grand plan for a complete curriculum of study never materialized as he intended, and several works are now lost.

Doug Spaniol will discuss his recent work restoring Weissenborn's music in a way that will on the one hand retain his original content and intent, and on the other hand meet the demands of today's bassoonists (and publishers). Included in the discussion will be how this work related to Doug's application for a Fulbright Teaching/Research Award and how the Fulbright helped enable much of the research. Click here to view the poster for this session.

No RSVP required. Beverages and snacks provided; please feel free to bring your lunch.

BIRS Workshops:
"Applying for External Grants":  Tuesday, September 25, 3-4 p.m., JH048
"Research and Compliance Information Session": Wednesday, September 26, 1-2:30 p.m., JH048
"Searching for Funding on the SPIN Database": Friday, September 28, 3-4 p.m., JH048
"Internal Grants (Butler Awards and Holcomb Awards) Informational Session": Thursday, October 4, AU111 (UClub)
Visit http://www.butler.edu/research-scholarship/calendar/ for detailed descriptions on these and other upcoming BIRS workshops and opportunities. RSVP to Dana Ohren by clicking here.

New Faculty Orientation: "Working with Diverse Learners and Learning Styles"
Thursday, September 27, noon-1 p.m., AU111 (UClub)

How can faculty best work with the variety of students who come into classes who may have different knowledge levels and skills? What are ways to capitalize on and support the diverse experiences students bring to class? How might assignments be structured to allow students to do their best work, or how can class time be managed, particularly when differences of opinion or experience surface? Meet in the University Club (south of The Market Place in Atherton Union) - lunch coupons will be available beginning at 11:45 a.m.

BIRS Workshop: "Applying for External Grants"
Wednesday, September 19, 10-11 a.m., JH048
This workshop will help you learn about the process of applying for external grants from start to finish. Topics covered include how to choose appropriate funding sources, how to put together application components, what to expect in the review process, and University guidelines for seeking external funding. The same material is covered in each session. RSVP to Dana Ohren by clicking here.

Visit http://www.butler.edu/research-scholarship/calendar/ for information on other upcoming BIRS workshops and opportunities.

Brown Bag Series, Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentations
Kate Boyd, Music: "John Cage: Sonatas and Interludes, for Prepared Piano"
Tuesday, September 18, noon-1 p.m., backstage of Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall

To commemorate the 2012 centenary of American composer, John Cage, Kate Boyd has been performing hisSonatas and Interludes, a 65-minute work for prepared piano. "Prepared piano" involves placing objects between the strings of the piano, thereby transforming its sound into one resembling a percussion orchestra. Kate will discuss Cage's "invention" of the prepared piano, and will describe the 2-hour preparation process required forSonatas and Interludes, in addition to demonstrating the piece and piano preparation techniques.

Beverages and snacks provided; please feel free to bring your lunch.

New Faculty Orientation: Guiding Class Discussions and Getting Students Engaged
Thursday, September 13, noon-1 p.m., AU201

New faculty academic-year orientation session on guiding class discussions, engaging students in classes, and employing active learning techniques in your classes. Meet in AU201 (south of The Market Place in Atherton Union) - lunch coupons will be available beginning at 11:45 a.m.

BIRS Coffee Hour
Friday, September 7, 10-11 a.m., Starbucks

Do you have questions on grants, intellectual property issues or compliance regulations? BIRS is hosting monthly coffee hours at Starbucks in Atherton Union. Come let them know what is on your mind and enjoy a free cup of coffee, compliments of BIRS.  Click here for information on other upcoming BIRS workshops and opportunities.

Student Learning Gains - They're Impressive! Lunch Conversations
Wednesday, September 5, Tuesday, September 11, or Tuesday, September 25
Over the past four years, the various assessments of student learning at Butler in which Butler participates are showing significant learning gains in our students. Join us for lunch during one of these three sessions to learn about where our students are succeeding and talk with each other about what you are doing that is contributing to student learning. All lunches will be held from noon-1 p.m. in the Johnson Room in Robertson Hall. To help us be best prepared for catering needs, please RSVP to Laura Cobb by clicking here.

New Faculty Orientation: Academic Year Orientation
Thursday, August 30, noon-1 p.m., AU201

All new faculty are invited to this first academic-year orientation session - this is a time to reconnect, look at the semester ahead, and ask and get answers to questions that may have arisen from the start of classes. Meet in AU201 (south of The Market Place in Atherton Union) - lunch coupons will be available beginning at 11:45 a.m.

Fall Faculty Workshop, "Blueprint for the Future"
Wednesday, August 15, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m.

Please join your colleagues for the annual Fall Faculty Workshop, focused this year on celebrating our successes as an institution. Hear from faculty and staff who have been working on the self-study about what they've learned about the many ways Butler is succeeding and building for the future. And then - back by popular demand - learn from colleagues who will share their best teaching practices in enhancing student learning. Click here to RSVP. 

New Faculty Orientation
Monday, August 13-Tuesday, August 14

All faculty new to Butler in Fall 2012, full- and part-time, are expected to attend in order to assist in their transition to Butler. Ongoing orientation sessions occur throughout the academic year. Contact Rebecca DeGrazia for more information by clicking here.

Summer Faculty Development Workshop: "Widening the View"
Tuesday, July 31-Wednesday, August 1

A summer workshop on culturally-focused learning and asset-based thinking. Asset-based thinking highlights assets of all students and then uses these diverse assets to enhance student learning by focusing on issues of equity and social justice as they apply to pedagogy, learning styles, curriculum, and assessment. Click  here for more information.

2011-2012 ~ Show Events

Spring 2012

BIRS Coffee Hour
Tuesday, May 1, 10-11 a.m., Starbucks
Come meet the University's interim Compliance Officer, Dr. Pamela Crowell, Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, at the next BIRS Coffee Hour. Dr. Crowell is a former Vice President for Research at Idaho State University and former Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Education at the Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis School of Science. She will work on issues related to research compliance, including Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR), Institutional Review Board (IRB), Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC), and Institutional Health and Safety Committee (IHSC), as well as Intellectual Property Rights Issues (patents, copyrights, etc.). The coffee is on BIRS!

Brown Bag Series, Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentations
Brooke Beloso (Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies): "Is 'Cyberprostitution' Prostitution? New Paradigms, Old Crime"
Wednesday, April 25, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111)
Brooke Beloso will examine the way in which an ensemble of new ICT practices and possibilities that the American legal system has recently begun to label "cyberprostitution" disturbs the status quo of the law as privileged conservator of sexual morality. She will map out the "early, clumsy form" of cyberprostitution today, and will explore the way in which such technical laymen as judges (and lawyers) have begun to apply familiar analogies from the past (principally, pimping and pandering, pornography, and prostitution) in their attempts to assimilate "cyberprostitution" into some semblance of a structure of rights and obligations. Clickhere to view the full abstract and poster for this presentation.

No RSVP necessary. Drinks and snacks provided; please feel free to bring your lunch.

Teaching and Learning with Technology Workshop: "Exploring Stories Digitally"
Tuesday, April 24, 2:30-3:30 p.m., JH048
Join Chris Bungard (LAS) as he discusses using digital stories in a variety of courses in order to push students to think about how the tools to think about how the tools of the digital age can be employed to think critically about the stories of the past. He will discuss the process along with logistical matters and share examples from his courses. Click here for more information on upcoming TLT workshops. 

BIRS Workshop: "Apply for a Grant this Summer"
Wednesday, April 18, noon-1 p.m., AU302
This presentation will focus on grant and fellowship opportunities with summer and early fall deadlines, and will include discussion on how to find these opportunities and how to use the summer to your advantage to complete the applications. Please RSVP to Dana Ohren by clicking here

Teaching and Learning with Technology Workshop: "iPads"
Wednesday, April 18, 3-4 p.m., JH048
The Physician Assistant program began a new mobile technology initiative evaluating the iPad 2 in the classroom. Join John Lucich (COPHS) as he provides updates on how the program is progressing, and discusses lessons learned and best practices. Click here for more information on upcoming TLT workshops. 

CANCELLED - University 101: "How Advancement Works" - Mark Helmus, Vice President for University Advancement
Wednesday, April 18, 4-5 p.m., AU302
Due to an on-campus conflict, the final University 101 session of the academic year has been cancelled. 

Lunch Conversation Opportunities for Core Area 1 & 2 Faculty
April 16, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111) - Area 1 - "Area 1 Assessment Update"
April 17, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111) - Area 2 - "Area 2 Review"
Faculty teaching in the Social World, Texts and Ideas, and Perspectives in the Creative Arts are invited to lunch on the 16th, and those teaching in the Natural World, Physical Well Being, and Analytical Reasoning are invited to lunch on the 17th. Join colleagues for conversation on teaching in these areas of the Core - lunch tickets to The Market Place will be provided. No RSVP necessary.

New Faculty Orientation: "Reflecting on and Evaluating the Year"
Thursday, April 12, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111)
Please join your colleagues for the final New Faculty Orientation session of the year. In addition to reflecting on the year, you'll be asked to provide feedback on new faculty opportunities and suggestions to help next year's group of new faculty have a successful transition. 

BIRS Workshop: "Grant Proposal Development"
Thursday, April 12, 10-11 a.m., JH048
This workshop will teach you the best practices for composing the narrative portions of grant proposals, including the project summary, goals and objectives, methodology, assessment and more. Special attention will be paid to the differences between research and programmatic proposals. Please RSVP to Dana Ohren by clicking here.

Teaching and Learning with Technology Workshop: "Using Social Bookmarking to Build Course Resources"
Wednesday, April 11, 3-4 p.m., JH048
Social Bookmarking is a way of collecting online resources in a single place accessible from any computer, anywhere. As such, it is a powerful tool for aggregating course resources into a single site. Julianne Miranda will lead a discussion that includes the tool Diigo and includes relevant examples from courses across campus. No registration required. Click here for more information on upcoming TLT workshops. 

Earth Project Event: "Apothecary Garden Revitalization Project"
Tuesday, April 10, 11 a.m. in PB156, with reception to follow at the Apothecary Garden path
The Butler University Apothecary Garden was originally designed by Ron Howe, a landscape architect, and Barbara Wilde, a designer who has a special interest in medicinal plants. This spring, the Garden is undergoing revitalization with a variety of new medicinal plantings and an artistic bench installation. Come celebrate this restoration with us as we will first hear a talk about medicinal plants and ethno-botany, followed by a choir presentation, art installation discussion, and reception with light refreshments.

Brown Bag Series, Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentations
Chris Bungard (Classical Studies): "Playing with the Trickster: The Undoing of Milphio"
Tuesday, April 10, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111)  
Scholars of the Roman playwright Plautus have focused on the role of the clever slave in scripting the plots of plays they are in. Some scholars have elevated these clever slaves to an equal status with Plautus as a playwright of their plays, but there is an inherent danger in doing so. Looking at Milphio in the play Poenulus, Chris Bungard will show the limits of this equation and the dangers Plautus warns us of believing we really are the roles we are called to play. Please click here to view the poster for this session.

No RSVP necessary. Drinks and snacks provided; please feel free to bring your lunch.

Earth Project Event: "Fermenting the Fruits of the Earth"
Thursday, April 5, 5 p.m., UClub (AU111)
This event will include a public presentation with the following elements: an overview of the history of hard cider production, a discussion of local conditions for cider production; a description and results of experiments with different kinds of yeast and different kinds of apples for cider production; and a tasting of ciders produced. Faculty team members for this Earth Project event include Brent Hege (Religion), Chris Hess (Biological Sciences), Travis Ryan (Biological Sciences), Brynnar Swenson (English), and Bill Watts (English). 

Earth Project Event: Guest Lecture, Wes Jackson, "Consulting the Genius of Place"
Thursday, March 29, 7:30 p.m., Reilly Room
Wes Jackson, president of The Land Institute, will provide a lecture on his recent work, "Consulting the Genius of the Place: An Ecological Approach to a New Agriculture." For more information on this and other upcoming events, please click  here.  

Brown Bag Series, Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentations
Margaret Brabant (Political Science): "The Slow Pace of Change - Citizenship and Women in the Republic of Turkey"
Thursday, March 29, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111)
In this presentation, Margaret Brabant will discuss her field-based research that analyzes how the educational system in Turkey reinforces a particular notion of Turkish citizenship and perpetuates a gendered concept of the ideal Turkish citizen. It appears as though the Turkish concept of citizenship produces paradoxical outcomes - at once stimulating the advancement and the erosion of women's rights. This presentation sets the historical and political context of citizenship in the Republic of Turkey and then focuses upon the efforts of a particular women's organization which seeks to address the needs of women who are marginalized from the realm of politics and precariously hold their rights as citizens.

No RSVP necessary. Drinks and snacks provided; please feel free to bring your lunch. 

University 101: Tom Weede, Vice President of Enrollment Management
Wednesday, March 28, 4-5 p.m., AU302
Join us for a conversation with Tom Weede, Vice President of Enrollment Management, to learn more about how the student enrollment process at Butler works. University 101 is a special year-long series focused on understanding how various administrative areas of a university work together. For a convivial atmosphere, wine, non-alcoholic beverages, and snacks will be provided.No RSVP required. 

Please mark your calendar for our next University 101 session with
Mark Helmus, Vice President for Advancement, on Wednesday, April 18 

Teaching and Learning with Technology Workshop:  WordPress and Google Docs for Your Course
Tuesday, March 27, 2-3 p.m., JH048
Interested in exploring an alternative method to a traditional learning management system? Join Bryan Furuness (FYS) to discuss a solution that is intuitive and user-friendly, both to you and your students. No registration required. Click here to learn more and for information on upcoming TLT workshops. 

Faculty Food for Thought: "Don't Say the Word…'Copyright'"
Thursday, March 22, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111)
Say the word and academics start to shudder, yet, librarians can provide guidance and strategies for following copyright best practices. Join Butler librarians to discuss this litigious minefield of copyright do's and don'ts. Click the following links to view materials from this presentation: copyright basicsuseful copyright links.

Lunch Conversation Opportunities for Core Area 1 & 2 Faculty
Wednesday, March 21, noon-1 p.m. UClub (AU111) - Area 2 - "Focus on the Natural World"
Monday, March 26, noon-1 p.m. UClub (AU111) - Area 1: "My Best Assignment"
Faculty teaching in the Natural World, Physical Well Being and Analytical Reasoning are invited to lunch on the 21st, and those teaching in the Social World, Texts and Ideas, and Perspectives in the Creative Arts are invited to lunch on the 26th. Join colleagues for conversation on teaching in these areas of the Core - lunch tickets to The Market Place will be provided. No RSVP necessary.

Teaching and Learning with Technology  Workshop:  Best Practices for Designing Your Course on a LMS
Tuesday, March 20, 3-4 p.m., JH048
Robin Turner (Political Science) will discuss her process for organizing and designing her courses to be engaging through the Moodle learning management system. No registration required. Click here to learn more and for information on upcoming TLT workshops. 

Earth Project Event: "Leading the Tiny House Movement: An Evening with Jay Shafer"
Tuesday, March 20, 5:30 p.m., Johnson Room, Robertson Hall
Is it possible to live in less than 100 square feet of space? How does your housing footprint relate to sustainability? Come hear Jay Shafer, author of "The Small House Book" and one of the founders of the tiny house movement, discuss sustainable living and the design of his tiny houses. Click here to see a poster for this event. For more information on the Earth Project, please click  here.  

Brown Bag Series, Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentations
Kristen Hoerl (CCOM) and Casey Kelly (CCOM): "Staging Disingenuous Controversy at the Creation Museum"
Tuesday, March 20, 12:15, UClub (AU111) - Please note the later start time
This presentation analyzes the argumentative structures that guide visitors' experiences at the "Answers in Genesis" ministry's Creation Museum in Petersburg, KY. Kristen Hoerl and Casey Kelly will explain that the Creation Museum stages a "disingenuous controversy" with evolutionary science to legitimate an interpretation of the Genesis myth as an equally-valid and more desirable explanation for the origins of life. Further, they suggest that the museum's technologically-advanced displays and pseudoscientific layout articulate the Creation Museum's status as a museum while it advances its ideological mission. They conclude that this museum is a representative anecdote for the ways in which contemporary fundamentalists adapt their texts to the formal and aesthetic conventions of secular society and manufacture controversy to delegitimize their opponents. Click here to view a poster for this session.

Brown Bag Series, Faculty Research, Scholarship and Creative Work Presentations
Shannon Lieb, Chemistry: "The Observation Problem in Quantum Mechanics"
Thursday, March 1, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111)
Quantum Mechanics is so fundamental to our understanding of all areas of Chemistry due to its ability to relate molecular structure at the atomic scale to function at the human scale.  Despite this fundamental role in Chemistry, Philosophers and Physicists who insist on pre-1900 Classical Physics explanations of physical phenomena malign Quantum Mechanics.  One of the crucial experiments that evokes this schism in science is the double slit experiment.  Shannon Lieb will explore developing an appreciation for how the "Observation Problem" of the double slit experiment is related to a classical, everyday "Monte Hall" problem. Click here to view a poster for this presentation. Click here to view the PowerPoint from this presentation.

Faculty Food for Thought: "High Impact Educational Practices"
Wednesday, February 29, begins at 12:30, UClub (AU111)
This session will focus on how we can make a positive difference in our students' academic success through high impact practices in individual courses and in programs. The first part of this session will include discussion on high-impact educational practices at Butler. The second part of this session,  beginning at 1:20, will include a webinar (with audio and video from AAC&U, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, and the California State University System Office) entitled "Employers Speak on Liberal Education." Even if you can only attend part of this extended session, all faculty are welcome to attend. So that we can best be prepared, please RSVP to Rebecca DeGrazia by clicking here.

Faculty Food for Thought: "Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (FSSE)"
Monday, February 27, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111)
OR Tuesday, February 28, noon-1 p.m. UClub (AU111)
Butler University administered The Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (FSSE) in March 2011. FSSE was designed to complement the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), which is administered to undergraduate students. The faculty version focuses on:

-          Faculty perceptions of how often students engage in different activities.

-          The importance faculty place on various areas of learning and development.

-          The nature and frequency of faculty-student interactions.

-          How faculty members organize their time, both in and out of the classroom.

This Faculty Food for Thought will focus on sharing the results of FSSE with faculty. The same information will be covered at both sessions. Lunch tickets to The Market Place will be provided. So that we can best be prepared, please RSVP to Rebecca DeGrazia by clicking here. Click   here to view handouts from this presentation.

New Faculty Orientation: "Understanding and Getting Involved - Faculty Governance"
Thursday, February 23, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111)
Join Margaret Brabant, Chair of the Faculty Senate, and Elizabeth Mix, Interim Vice-Chair of the Faculty Senate, for a conversation about how faculty governance works at Butler. They'll go over committee structure, how faculty decisions get made, how the election or appointment process works, and suggest ways for you to get involved. Meet in the University Club (just outside the south doors of The Market Place). Lunch coupons will be available beginning at 11:45.

Brian Murphy, Physics & Astronomy
Brown Bag Lunch - Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentation

Wednesday, February 22, noon-1 p.m., AU111
Stars come in various colors, radii, masses, and compositions.  These properties determine how a star will live and eventually die.  Star clusters are particularly useful for understanding the lives of stars since we can do a stellar census of a cluster with just a few digital images.  In this talk, Brian Murphy will discuss our current understanding of the lives and deaths of stars.  He will focus on research he and his students have been pursuing on pulsating giant stars that can varying in brightness by 300% in just one hour. Click here to view a poster for this presentation.

Lunch Conversation Opportunities for Core Area 1 & 2 Faculty
Monday, February 20, noon-1 p.m., AU201, Area 1 
Tuesday, February 21, noon-1 p.m., AU111, Area 2 
Faculty teaching in the Social World, Texts and Ideas, and Perspectives in the Creative Arts are invited to lunch on the 20th, and those teaching in the Natural World, Physical Well Being and Analytical Reasoning are  invited to lunch on the 21st. Join colleagues for conversation on teaching in these areas of the Core - lunch  tickets to The Market Place will be provided. No RSVP required.

Faculty Food for Thought: "Publishing at an Academic Press"
Thursday, February 16, noon-1 p.m., Johnson Room, Robertson Hall
If you are considering publishing a book with an academic press, you will not want to miss this opportunity to hear first-hand what the process entails. Even if you have already published a book, come learn what is new and what you can do to facilitate the process. Dee Mortensen, Senior Sponsoring Editor at Indiana University Press, will be on campus to speak about academic publishing and answer your questions. Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to Dana Ohren by clicking here.

New Faculty Orientation: "Getting Involved with Interdisciplinary Programs and Honors"
Thursday, February 9, noon-1 p.m., AU111
Join us for a discussion with the Interdisciplinary Program Directors: Vivian Deno (Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies), Siobhan McEvoy-Levy (Peace Studies), Antonio Menendez-Alarcon (International Studies), and Travis Ryan (Science, Technology and Society); and Amy Elson, Program Coordinator for the Honors Program.  Meet in the University Club (just outside the south doors of The Market Place) - lunch coupons will be available beginning at 11:45 a.m.

Jon Sorenson, Computer Science: "The Life and Work of Alan M. Turing"
Brown Bag Lunch - Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentation
Wednesday, February 8, noon-1 p.m., AU111 - No RSVP necessary
In the 1930s, the British mathematician Alan Turing developed a mathematical model of computation, now called the Turing Machine, which has encouraged many to give him credit for the invention of the computer as we know it today.  In this talk, Jon Sorenson will look at Turing's work, and discuss some of the controversies surrounding his life. Click here to view a poster for this presentation.

The Brown Bag Series provides an opportunity for Butler faculty to present their original research, scholarship, and creative work, aimed to speak to both departmental colleagues and those in completely different disciplines.

Faculty Food for Thought: "The 'One-Search' Google Solution: Primo"
Thursday, January 26, noon-1 p.m., AU111
Beginning in Fall 2011, students are now able to search via a single search box interface and retrieve book citations, ebooks, and journal articles across multiple library subscription databases. How will this impact your student's research? Are you ready to embrace our new Google-ized "Primo" catalog? Lunch coupons to The Market Place will be provided. So that we can best be prepared, please RSVP by clicking here.

Lunch Conversation Opportunities for Core Area 1 & 2 Faculty
Tuesday, January 24, noon-1 p.m., AU201 - Area 2, "Kick-Off to the Spring Semester"
Monday, January 30, noon-1 p.m., AU111 - Area 1, "The SLO Ride - IDEA Forms and Your Area 1 Course"
Faculty teaching in the Natural World, Physical Well Being and Analytical Reasoning are invited to lunch on the 24th, and those teaching in the Social World, Texts and Ideas, and Perspectives in the Creative Arts are  invited to lunch on the 30th. Join colleagues for conversation on teaching in these areas of the Core - lunch tickets to The Market Place will be provided.

New Faculty Orientation: "Advising Students: What Works, What Doesn't, and How to Get Involved"
Thursday, January 19, noon-1 p.m., AU111
Please join us for the first ongoing orientation of the new semester - the focus will be on advising students. Jennifer Griggs, Learning Resource Center, and Shelly Furuness, College of Education, will share strategies on how to be an effective advisor, and ways you can be involved in early registration of incoming students. Meet in the University Club (just outside the south doors of The Market Place) - lunch coupons will be available at the south door of The Market Place in the Atherton Union beginning at 11:45 a.m.

Fall 2011

Faculty Coffee Break - Celebrate a Successful End to the Semester!
Friday, December 9, 9-11 a.m., JH109 - no RSVP required

Reward yourself with a coffee break on this last day of classes for the fall semester. When you need that mid-morning boost, come on over to JH109 - we'll have coffee, tea, and a variety of breakfast pastries. A terrific opportunity to join friends and colleagues from across campus for conversation and camaraderie.

Teaching and Learning with Technology (TLT) Workshop: Using RSS Feeds to Keep Current with Scholarship
Thursday, December 1, 3-4 p.m., JH048 - no RSVP required
So much information is readily available online, so the question arises: How can I organize all of the sites I visit and sift through all of the stories and articles? Join Scott Pfitzinger (Libraries) in a discussion about RSS feeds and Google Reader as a few of many solutions that can keep you organized and save your time.

Institute for Research and Scholarship Internal Grants Open House
Wednesday, November 30, 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., AU302 - no RSVP required
The deadline for submitting internal research grant, fellowship grant, and instructional development grant applications is February 6, 2012! Join staff from Butler's Institute for Research and Scholarship (BIRS) for an internal grants open house. Bring your thoughts, proposals, and budgets and have them reviewed and discussed by past members of the Holcomb Awards Committee (HAC) and the Butler Awards Committee (BAC).

Also during the open house, Dr. Monte Broaded, Director of the Center for Global Education, will be on hand from 9:30-11 a.m. and from 1:30-2:30 p.m. to provide information about Butler's Global Initiative Grants program. Apply for funding to enhance your foreign language skills; deepen your knowledge of another country or world region; create a new course (or revise an existing course) with significant international or global content; or undertake a scouting trip abroad as part of your preparation to offer a short-term faculty-led program for Butler students.

Refreshments will be served. For more information, please contact Bob Holm (rholm@butler.edu) or Monte Broaded (mbroaded@butler.edu).

New Faculty Orientation: Faculty Activity Reports
Tuesday, November 29, noon-1 p.m., AU111 - PLEASE NOTE THE CHANGE IN DATE
An important way to document achievements each year is the Faculty Activity Report. This session introduces the Report and provides suggestions on how to best complete it. Meet in the University Club (just outside the south doors of The Market Place) - lunch coupons will be available at the south door of The Market Place beginning at 11:45 a.m.

University 101: Bruce Arick, Vice President for Finance
Thursday, November 17, 4-5 p.m., PB156
Join us for a conversation with Bruce Arick, Vice President for Finance, to learn more about finances at Butler University. Ever wonder how the university budget gets put together and what it looks like? Want to know what the endowment is and its historic trends? Curious about how the endowment is calculated, what we're invested in, and how the university spends it? Curious about the national financial trends in higher education?

University 101 is a special year-long series focused on understanding how various administrative areas of a university work together.No RSVP required.

The series will continue in the spring semester with the remaining administrative areas.
For a convivial atmosphere, wine, non-alcoholic beverages, and snacks will be provided. 

Earth Project Event: Yin Yang Ruminations:  Mahler's Song of the Earth
Wednesday,
 November 16, 7:30 pm, Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall, following with a reception in the Ford Salon
2011 marks the centenary of the death of one of the Romantic Era's greatest composers, Gustav Mahler. Das Lied von der Erde (The Song of the Earth) a song cycle of symphonic proportions, is considered by many to be Mahler's greatest work. 
Butler faculty Mark Gilgallon (voice), Thomas Studebaker (voice), Anna Briscoe (music), Xiaoqing Liu (modern and foreign languages), and Frank Felice (music) will perform/present.

Teaching and Learning with Technology (TLT) Workshop: Using Social Bookmarking to Build Course Resources
Wednesday, November 16, 3-4 p.m., JH048
Social bookmarking is a way of collecting online resources in a single place accessible from any computer, anywhere. Julianne Miranda, Center for Academic Technology, will lead a discussion that includes the tool Diigo and includes relevant examples from courses across campus.  Click  here to learn more to learn more and for information on upcoming TLT workshops.

The Future of Technology in Higher Education: "Digital Shoreline" Audio Conference
Wednesday, November 16, 1-2 p.m., HB121 
Interested in the future of technology in higher education? If so, you're invited to sit in on an audio conference presentation on how these forces are pressuring colleges to change. Roger McHaney, author ofThe New Digital Shoreline: How Web 2.0 and Millennials Are Revolutionizing Higher Education, will review the specific changes in technology that have the greatest impact on college education today, as well as the impact for colleges of enrolling students who are more tech-savvy than ever before.  The first 30-minutes of this audio conference will feature McHaney's presentation, followed by a 30-minute Q&A session.No RSVP required.

Topics to be covered include:
- What today's students know well (and what they don't) with regard to technology
- The technologies most important to students
- How to tell the difference between today's fad and a significant shift in student behavior and expectations
- The impact of social media
- The challenges and potential of teaching in the new environment
- The way institutions can examine whether their educational and extracurricular programming is appropriately designed for this new era

Earth Project Event: Seeing the Earth through Other Eyes
Student Photo Gallery Show - November 14-18 (International Week), throughout Jordan Hall
Student Presentation on Tuesday, November 15, 5-6:30 pm, JH141
Throughout the week, a photo show of various sites visited, admiring both views of land inside and outside of the city of Rome will be on display throughout Jordan Hall, from students who traveled with Chris Bungard (Philosophy and Religion) to Rome and the Bay of Naples. On Tuesday, November 15, a presentation of some digital stories composed by these students will take place in JH141 from 5-6:30 pm. These students were each given a character sketch of an individual from Pompeii or Herculaneum (based on actual graffiti from the two towns). They then developed a story to explain how their character would have experienced the massive upheaval of earth caused in August of 79 CE when Mount Vesuvius erupted. 

Center for Citizenship and Community Workshop: Service-Learning, Community, Social Justice? 
Wednesday, November 9, noon-1 p.m., AU326
Do your courses bring students into contact with communities beyond Butler? Have you confronted the "underside" of service-learning -- students resistant to service and/or critical thinking? Are you working to deepen the connection between service-learning and social justice? In this workshop, we will help you to share successes, struggles, and strategies with other service-learning and community action practitioners. This session will create a space for open, honest, and productive discussions about the rewards and challenges of community-engaged pedagogies. Lunch will be provided. So that we can best be prepared, please RSVP to Sharon Schuyler by clicking here.

New Faculty Orientation: Course Evaluations
Tuesday, November 8, noon-1 p.m., University Club, AU111 - PLEASE NOTE THE CHANGE IN DATE
As the end of the semester approaches, join us to talk about how course evaluations are administered at Butler. Meet in the University Club (just outside the south doors of The Market Place) - lunch coupons will be available at the south door of The Market Place beginning at 11:45 a.m.

Earth Project Event: Touring New Orleans Pre- and Post-Katrina: Environmental Justice, Communication, and Research
Friday, November 4, 12:00-1:30 pm (lunch will be served), GH105
Guest Dr. Phaedra Pezzullo's public lecture will draw from her extensive research on environmental justice, tourism, and communications in Louisiana over the last decade. Her analysis of commercial and noncommercial tours highlights the interconnections between tourist practices, discourse, and social mobilization, exploring the many different ways in which activists and businesses use tours.

Teaching and Learning with Technology (TLT) Workshop: Give Yourself a Digital Makeover
Tuesday, November 1, 1-2:30 p.m., JH048
Technology offers much more than a faster and easier way to teach and learn the same old things with the same old methods. Rather, today's digital and web-based tools open up brand new approaches to the craft of teaching. Shelly Furuness (Education) will highlight some of the tools that have transformed her courses to engage today's "digital native" students. Click  here   for more information on upcoming TLT workshops.

Faculty Food for Thought Coffee Break: Who Bought That Book?
Thursday, October 27, 2:30 p.m., JH109
Imagine a day where if you want a particular book or article for your research, you can simply click a button and the library purchases a book for you. Known as "patron-driven acquisitions" this day may not be too far off. Join the librarians in discussing different collection development models that are attempting to address "patron point-of-need" demands.

Teaching and Learning with Technology (TLT) Workshop: Utilizing Blackboard and Video Capture to Enhance Your Course
Wednesday, October 26, 1-2 p.m., JH048
Blackboard and Panopto (Butler University Content Capture System) work seamlessly together to offer many possibilities for your course. Panos Linos (Computer Science) will share the ways in which he is using these two tools to better utilize his students time inside and outside of class.

New Faculty Orientation: Understanding How the Core Curriculum Works at Butler
Wednesday, October 19, noon-1 p.m., University Club, AU111
Majors and minors, concentrations and the Core. Join us for lunch to see how the curriculum works at Butler, particularly during this advising time. Meet in the University Club (just outside the south doors of The Market Place) - lunch coupons will be available at the south door of The Market Place beginning at 11:45 a.m.

Faculty Coffee Break - Get Fueled for Advising Week!
Monday, October 17, 9-11 a.m., JH109
When you need that mid-morning boost, come on over to JH109 - we'll have coffee, tea, and a variety of breakfast pastries. A terrific opportunity to join friends and colleagues from across campus for   conversation and camaraderie. Mark your calendar for the next faculty coffee break this semester as well, on Friday, December 9.

Service-Learning Workshop: Possibilities and Potential
Wednesday, October 12, noon-1 p.m., AU201
Do you: need ideas for creating a service-learning course? wonder how service-learning might fit into your discipline? want help in integrating service-learning into an existing course? have concerns about the time or logistics involved in service-learning?

In this workshop we will help you explore adding a service-learning component within an existing or future course. We will follow-up this workshop with individualized support, at a later date, for those interested. Lunch will be provided. So that we can best be prepared, please RSVP to Sharon Schuyler by clicking here.

Teaching and Learning with Technology (TLT) Workshop: Using iPads to Understand Changes in the Workplace
Monday, October 10, 3-4 p.m., JH048
Technology is ever-changing in the workplace and can hinder a business from growth. Join Jason Davidson (COB) as he discusses how he utilizes iPads in his courses to help students understand these changes and how to adapt to them. The Center for Academic Technology's TLT series are faculty-led discussion-oriented sessions that highlight effective integration of technology in teaching. Please click  here for more information.

Earth Project Event: Urbanized Summit
Friday, October 7, 1-5 p.m., Indianapolis Museum of Art, The Toby Theatre
Engage with urban leaders and change-makers in a half-day summit focused on the design of Indianapolis and issues around urbanism: transit, civility, diversity, redevelopment, livability, and resilience. The summit is segmented into three themes: LOOK, MOVE, and GROW. In the LOOK segment, hear from experts on big ideas foundational to the future of our city. In MOVE, tackle issues surrounding transit in Indianapolis. In GROW, participate in a sticky-note brainstorming session facilitated by Big Car and Keep Indianapolis Beautiful designed to translate urban design livability principles into actionable ideas. Also, at the Urbanized Bazaar, meet those leading the latest and greatest uban design initiatives that are shaping Indianapolis now and in the future. At 5 p.m., Gary Hustwit's new film, Urbanized, will be screened in The Toby, following the summit. Click here to view a pdf poster for this event.

University 101: Levester Johnson, Vice President for Student Affairs
Thursday, October 6, 4-5 p.m., PB156
Student affairs work has evolved over the years to combine best practices in serving the basic needs of students and collegiate community members with the delivery of programs and collaborations that positively affect the engagement and retention of students. This presentation will explore the scope of services offered through student affairs offices as well as share benchmark data on the Butler undergraduate experience.

University 101 is a special year-long series focused on understanding how various administrative areas of a university work together. Please mark your calendar for the next conversation this semester: 

Thursday, November 17, 4-5 p.m.,PB156 -- Bruce Arick, Vice President for Finance

 The series will continue in the spring semester with the remaining administrative areas.
For a convivial atmosphere, wine, non-alcoholic beverages, and snacks will be provided.

Understanding Your IDEA Center Course Evaluations
Wednesday, October 5, multiple session times offered, all in AU326
In response to faculty requests, we're bringing back an expert from the IDEA Center to help you understand how best to use the Summary Reports of your scores and how best to fine-tune (if necessary) the Objectives on the Faculty Information Form (FIF); they'll also be able to answer questions you might have about how scores are calculated.

Two sessions for faculty (9-10:30 a.m. or 2:30-4 p.m.) and one session for department heads/program directors (noon-1:30 p.m.) will be offered. Please plan to bring your Summary Reports as references. We'll have samples for new faculty. Steve Benton, PhD, Senior Research Officer from the IDEA Center and Professor Emeritus from Kansas State University, will lead the sessions.

Information on IDEA Center course evaluations is available online at www.theideacenter.org, including "Notes on Instruction," "Interpretive Guide on IDEA Diagnostic Form Report," and "Interpreting Adjusted Ratings of Outcomes."

Please RSVP to Rebecca DeGrazia, indicating which session you plan to attend, by clicking here. Snacks and beverages will be available at all three sessions.  

Earth Project Event: Uncooking Class
Friday, September 30, 5-7 p.m., Harrison Center for the Arts (1505 N. Delaware St, Indianapolis)
Join Butler Professor Tom Dolan, local chefs and home cooks as they explore how to cook without using an oven. Hands-on demonstrations include using fermentation, citric acid, pickling, and raw food techniques to prepare delicious, healthy food. Click here to view a pdf poster for this event.

New Faculty Orientation: Working with Diverse Learners and Learning Styles
Wednesday, September 28, noon-1 p.m., University Club, AU111
How can faculty best work with the variety of students who come into classes who may have different knowledge levels and skills? What are ways to best capitalize on and support the diverse experiences students bring to class? How might assignments be structured to allow students to do their best work, or how can class time be managed, particularly when differences of opinion or experience surface?

Center for Academic Technology Workshop
Wednesday, September 21, 3-4 p.m., JH048
The Center for Academic Technology's Teaching and Learning (TLT) series kicks off on September 21, with Kent Van Tyle (College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences) presenting on ways in which gaming applications are being used as a tool in higher education coursework to enhance student participation, engagement and learning. The TLT series are faculty-led discussion oriented sessions that highlight effective integration of technology in teaching. Please click  here for more information.

Faculty Food for Thought: Writing Letters for Fellowships, Graduate Schools, and Professional Schools
Wednesday, September 21, noon-1 p.m., JH109
Join colleagues in a discussion of what to require from students who seek letters for graduate or professional school, or postgraduate fellowships; when to say, "I'm sorry, I'm not the person you should be asking for a letter;" and the differences between letters for graduate school applications and letters for national fellowships and scholarships. Attendees will receive a copy of Writing Effective Letters of Recommendationand several handouts. Click the following links to view handouts from this presentation: Writing Letters of RecommendationRequesting Letters of Recommendation

Faculty Food for Thought: The Future of Academic Libraries
Thursday, September 15, noon-1 p.m., University Club, AU111
This is a hot topic in academic settings as some institutions are questioning the need for an actual library building and services. Join Butler librarians to discuss how librarian roles have changed from being the gatekeepers of information to playing a key role in teaching information literacy, how libraries are leading the way in digitizing unique university collections and faculty scholarship, and how library spaces are evolving to meet student learning needs. So that we can be best prepared, please RSVP by clicking here.

University 101: Jamie Comstock, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs
Wednesday, September 14, 4-5 p.m., PB156
Join us for the premier session of our new University 101 series, with a presentation by Dr. Jamie Comstock, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. University 101 is a special year-long series focused on understanding how various administrative areas of a university work together. We've invited the vice-presidents to talk with faculty about their respective areas and explain what, at times, may seem mystifying: What are the trends in higher education and do we have to pay attention to them? Who actually manages the endowment? What do your students do when they are not in class? How do you recruit students to come to Butler? This is a terrific opportunity to come together in conversation to learn more about how a university works.

 Please mark your calendar for the following conversations this semester:
Thursday, October 6, 4-5 p.m., PB156 -- Levester Johnson, Vice President for Student Affairs
Thursday, November 17, 4-5 p.m.,PB156 -- Bruce Arick, Vice President for Finance

 The series will continue in the spring semester with the remaining administrative areas.
For a convivial atmosphere, wine, non-alcoholic beverages, and snacks will be provided.

New Faculty Orientation: Guiding Class Discussions and Getting Students Engaged
Wednesday, September 14, noon-1 p.m., AU111
New faculty academic-year orientation session on guiding class discussions, engaging students in classes, and employing active learning techniques for your classes.    

Faculty Coffee Break Kick-off!
Wednesday, September 14, 9-11 a.m., JH109
When you need that mid-morning boost, come on over to JH109 - we'll have coffee, tea, and a variety of breakfast pastries. A terrific opportunity to join friends and colleagues from across campus for conversation and camaraderie. Mark your calendar for other upcoming faculty coffee breaks this semester as well, on Monday, October 17 and Friday, December 9.

Earth Project Event: Networks for Life
September 13, 6:30 p.m., Clowes Memorial Hall
Entomologist Doug Tallamy returns to Clowes Hall to discuss the scientific basis for biodiversity conservation. Biological diversity is essential to sustaining human societies, but throughout the U.S. we have fragmented the habitats that support biodiversity. These isolated habitats cannot support healthy ecosystems, from which we receive a wide variety of necessary services. We can reconnect viable habitats by changing the landscaping paradigm that dominates our residential and municipal landscapes. This strategy could create 20 million acres of connectivity in support of biodiversity. But we must act now. Click here for more information.

Earth Project Event: Food Con II
Friday, September 2, 5-9 p.m., Harrison Center for the Arts (1505 N. Delaware Street)
In 2010, the Harrison Center hosted FoodCon, an unconventional convention and first-of-its-kind showcase and exploration of the art and culture of food in Indianapolis. The event attracted over 2000 attendees. Propelled by the interest and enthusiasm surrounding the 2010 event, the Harrison Center, in partnership with Butler University and others, announces FoodCon II. Click here for more information.

Click  here for more information on the Earth Project and to view a calendar listing of other upcoming Earth Project events.

New Faculty Academic-Year Orientation Session
Wednesday, August 31, noon-1 p.m., University Club, AU111
All new faculty are invited to this first academic-year orientation session - this is a time to reconnect, look at the semester ahead, and ask and get answers to questions that may have arisen from the start of classes.

Fall Faculty Workshop "What Our Teachers Do Best"
Wednesday, August 17, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m., Reilly Room, Atherton Union
Please join your colleagues for the annual Fall Faculty Workshop, focused this year on your best teaching practices. The Provost's address will be followed by concurrent sessions of Butler faculty presenting on their best teaching practices. Morning refreshments and lunch will be provided. To RSVP for the workshop, please click here.    

New Faculty Orientation
Monday, August 15 and Tuesday, August 16
All faculty new to Butler in Fall 2011, full- and part-time, are expected to attend in order to assist in their transition to Butler. Ongoing orientation sessions occur throughout the academic year. Click  here for more information.

FYS Summer Workshop
Thursday, August 11-Friday, August 12, JH174
The faculty development team of the FYS advisory committee is happy to announce a FYS workshop for faculty teaching in the program this year. The workshop is scheduled for August 11 and 12 (9 a.m.-4 p.m.) For faculty new to teaching in the program, you are also invited to attend a half day session on August 10, from noon-4 p.m., to learn more about the course goals.

Lunch, refreshments, and materials will be provided. If you have not already done so, please RSVP to Laura Cobb by clicking here. Please contact Shelly Furuness (sfurunes@butler.edu) with any questions.

2010-2011 ~ Show Events

Spring 2011

Waters Project End-of-the-Year Celebration
Thursday, April 21, 6-8 p.m., Fountain Room - Indianapolis Museum of Art

Join Butler colleagues as we watch the water flow forward from another productive and successful academic year. All faculty are invited, along with their spouse, partner or significant other, to attend this celebration, hosted by the Provost and the Waters Project Committee. The winners of Waters Project awards will be announced, artwork related to the Waters Project will be on display, and JCFA's

Dr. Matthew Pivec will assemble a jazz ensemble to perform music on the theme of the event. Celebratory beverages and light appetizers will be served. Please RSVP to Monica Strigari by clicking here.

Faculty Food for Thought: "Critical Reflection in Experiential Education"
Thursday, April 21, 1-3 p.m., University Club (AU111)

Practitioners of service-learning and other forms of experiential learning have long understood that reflection is essential for converting experience to learning. Yet designing and implementing effective reflection practices is not easy. Please join us for a discussion on critical reflection with Patti Clayton, Ph.D. Dr. Clayton is currently serving as Senior Scholar with the Center for Service and Learning at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI). A delicious and nutritious lunch will be served to foster community. Please RSVP by April 18 to Sharon Schuyler by clicking here.

Grant Workshop Series
"Introduction to the External Grant Process at Butler" - Tuesday, April 19, 10-11 a.m., JH048
"Searching for Grants on the SPIN Database" - Wednesday, April 20, 10-11 a.m., JH048
"Writing Grant Proposals" - Thursday, April 21, 3-4 p.m., JH048
"Creating Grant Budgets" - Friday, April 22, 3-4 p.m., JH041

Do you need money to conduct research, develop a course or implement a program? The Butler Institute for Research and Scholarship (BIRS) is offering a workshop series about the best practices for developing proposals for external funding. All faculty and staff are welcome to attend. To reserve a space, please RSVP to Dana Ohren by clicking here and be sure to include which session(s) you wish to attend. Refreshments will be provided at each workshop. For more information about the external grant process, please visit the BIRS website at www.butler.edu/birs.

New Faculty Orientation: "Reflecting and Evaluating the Year"
Wednesday, April 13, noon-1 p.m., University Club (AU111)

Please join your colleagues for the final New Faculty Orientation session of the year. In addition to reflecting on the year, you'll be asked to provide feedback on new faculty opportunities and suggestions to help next year's group of new faculty have a successful transition.  Meet in the University Club (just outside the south doors of The Market Place) - lunch coupons will be available at the south door of The Market Place beginning at 11:45 a.m.

Webinar: "Transformational Learning Through Undergraduate Research and Creative Performance"
Tuesday, April 12, 2:00-3:30 p.m., JH083

Like to learn more about undergraduate research, scholarship, and creative work? We'll be hosting a webinar called "Transformational Learning through Undergraduate Research and Creative Performance," presented by Moses Lee, Professor and Dean of the Natural Sciences at Hope College and sponsored by the Council for Undergraduate Research. Moses will be joined by three other Hope faculty: Michael Seymour, Professor of Chemistry, Lorna Jarvis, Professor of Psychology, and William Pannapacker, Associate Professor of English. Lee and colleagues will discuss the value of undergraduate research and creative performance to promote learning, the resources available to develop and enhance Undergraduate Research and Creative Performance programs through CUR, and the transformation of student learning at Hope through research. This webinar will take placeTuesday, April 12 from 2-3:30 p.m. in JH083. Please come when you can and leave when you must.

Waters Project Event: "Waters of the World - Human Stories of Water"
Tuesday, April 12, 4 p.m., Outside Starbucks (inside Starbucks in case of inclement weather)

Water is a dominant theme in the stories of many cultures across the globe. In this panel discussion, participants from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences will share stories of African, Indian, Scottish, Mediterranean, and Nordic peoples, and discuss the importance of water in their storytelling traditions. These stories will encourage those in attendance to consider the role that water plays around the world and throughout human history.

Lunch Conversation Opportunities for Area 2 faculty
Wednesday, April 6, noon-1 p.m., AU201

Faculty teaching in the Natural World, Physical Well Being and Analytic Reasoning are invited to join colleagues for a conversation on teaching in these areas of the Core. Lunch tickets to The Market Place will be provided. 

"Designing Novel Antibiotics in Undergraduate Laboratories"
Jeremy Johnson, Chemistry
Wednesday, March 30, noon - 1 p.m., AU111

Since the discovery of penicillin in the 1920's, antibiotics have become the standard treatment for bacterial and fungal infections. The overuse of these antibiotics has however led to the development of antibiotic resistance amongst bacterial populations. The emergence of these new antibiotic resistant bacteria or "superbugs" has created a significant human health hazard. Yet, only three new classes of antibiotics have been developed in the last 40 years. So how do you design a novel antibiotic? In this presentation, Jeremy Johnson, Chemistry, will explain the basics of drug design and describe the construction of novel antibiotics using undergraduate laboratories at Butler.

Click here to see a pdf version of the poster for this presentation. 

Faculty Food for Thought: Recruiting Students for National Fellowships and Post-Graduate Awards
Thursday, March 24, noon - 1 p.m. in AU111, 4-5 p.m. in JH109

Harry Truman, George Mitchell, William Fulbright, Morris Udall, David Boren, Jacob Javitz, Barry Goldwater.What do these former U.S. legislators (and one president) have to do with Butler students?  Each has had a national scholarship or fellowship program named in his honor for which Butler students are eligible! 

All faculty are invited to a special lunch conversation to learn more about post-graduate fellowships and grants and how to identify Butler students for these awards.  Each year hundreds of U.S. undergraduates apply for nationally competitive scholarships and fellowships. Some awards take on mythic proportions and appear to be the exclusive province of students from the most elite U.S. colleges and universities.The reality is that high-achieving Butler students make very competitive candidates for these and the myriad of national scholarships and fellowships available each year.  You can play an important role in identifying students for these awards. 

Please join colleagues to learn more about identifying and recruiting top Butler students for national scholarships and fellowships; the discussion will be led by CHASE Office Associate Director Mariangela Maguire. Click here to view handouts from this session.

Faculty Coffee Break
Thursday, March 24, 3 - 4-45 p.m., JH109

Please join friends and colleagues from across campus for a coffee break - when you hit that afternoon lull, come over to JH109 - we'll have coffee and tea, a variety of cookies, and good conversation. Come when you can, stay for as long as you'd like. And mark your calendars for our last faculty coffee break of the semester on April 27, as well.

New Faculty Orientation: "When They're Not in Class - Student Life at Butler"
Wednesday, March 23, noon - 1 p.m., AU111

Join Irene Stevens, Dean of Student Life, and Sally Click, Dean of Student Services, to learn more about our students, who they are, what they do outside of their classes, and the programs and support that exist for them. Click here to view handouts from this session.

"What is Transnational Literature?"
Brown Bag Lunch - Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentation by Ania Spyra, English
Wednesday, March 9, noon-1 p.m., University Club (AU111) (rescheduled from an earlier date due to weather candellation)

"Transnational" has become the buzzword in literary studies. It often replaces terms such as "comparative," "international," "world," or "global" in describing literature influenced by globalization. But is there really such a thing as transnational literature? If so, how is it different from immigrant or postcolonial literature? While questioning the ubiquity of the term, Ania Spyra will argue that its strength resides in de-centering the nation state as the standard unit of academic inquiry. Used as a way to describe a collection of literary texts, "transnational" transforms the perception of literature as necessarily a national endeavor. Click here to see a pdf version of the poster for this session.

Lunch Conversation Opportunities for Area 2 faculty
Monday, March 7, noon-1 p.m., AU111

Faculty teaching in the Natural World, Physical Well Being and Analytic Reasoning are invited to join colleagues for a conversation on teaching in these areas of the Core. Lunch tickets to The Market Place will be provided. 

Waters Project Event: "An Evening of Water-Inspired Music for Piano"
Friday, March 4, 8 p.m., Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall

The Jordan College of Fine Arts, the Indiana Piano Teachers' Guild, and the Waters Project are pleased to present the final "Piano at Butler" event of the academic year. Australian pianist Simon Docking will perform a solo recital, the program including piano works inspired by a water theme by a variety of composers, including Franz Liszt, Oliver Messiaen, and Benjamin Britten. Visit the Waters Project calendar for more information by clicking here. Click here to view a pdf poster for this event.

Speaking Across the Curriculum Workshop
Friday, March 4, 1-3:30 p.m., JH170

Please join faculty colleagues for a workshop on developing a course that fulfills the speaking across the curriculum expectation of the new Core curriculum. Led by Butler faculty with expertise in the discipline, learn how to create a speaking across the curriculum course, develop assignments and projects, and how to assess or evaluate student work in such a course. The workshop will begin at 1 p.m., with lunch for participants starting at 12:30 p.m., and free-flowing beverages and snacks during the break. To signal your interest in participating, please RSVP to Rebecca DeGrazia by March 1 by clicking here.

"Designed for Failure: America's Alternative Energy Policies"
Brown Bag Lunch - Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentation by Peter Grossman, Clarence Efroymson Professor of Economics
Monday, February 28, noon-1 p.m., University Club (AU111)

Why have U.S. government programs to create alternative energy technologies always failed? Because they have been based on the mistaken belief that - like the Apollo moon landing - creating a viable alternative energy technology is only an engineering problem. In fact, substitution of energy technologies involves commercial and social questions that engineering alone cannot solve. Peter Grossman contends that policymakers are confused about the way innovation occurs and how new products succeed in the market. Although the promise of a grand engineering feat has political traction, U.S. energy policy with respect to alternatives has inevitably failed, and current programs will almost surely continue that historical record.

Faculty Coffee Break
Wednesday, February 23, 2-3:30, JH109

Please join friends and colleagues from across campus for a coffee break - when you hit that afternoon lull, come over to JH109 - we'll have coffee and tea, a variety of cookies, and good conversation. Come when you can, stay for as long as you'd like. And mark your calendars for upcoming coffee breaks on March 24 and April 27, as well.

New Faculty Orientation: "Understanding and Getting Involved - Faculty Governance"
Wednesday, February 23, noon-1 p.m., University Club (AU111)

Join Margaret Brabant, Chair of the Faculty Senate, and Doug Spaniol, Vice-Chair of the Faculty Senate, for a conversation about how faculty governance works at Butler. They'll go over committee structure, how faculty decisions get made, how the election or appointment process works, and suggest ways for you to get involved. Meet in the University Club (just outside the south doors of The Market Place). Lunch coupons will be available at the south door of The Market Place in Atherton Union beginning at 11:45 a.m.

Waters Project Event: "¡Viva agua!: The Waters Project in Spain"
Monday, February 21, noon-1 p.m., Modern Language Center (JH387)

In Fall 2010, Dr. Linda Willem led a class of 17 students in Butler University's Semester in Spain program. The students studied at Universidad de Alcalá de Henares and visited various sites throughout Spain, paying attention to the waters at each location. Additionally, Dr. Willem taught a course on Madrid in which she also incorporated the waters theme. Join us for a light lunch and refreshments as Dr. Willem and some of her students recall the waters of Spain and share their experiences.  

Assessment Conversation Opportunities for Texts and Ideas and Perspectives in the Creative Arts
Thursday, February 17, noon-1 p.m., AU302 (T&I)
Thursday, February 24, noon-1 p.m., AU302 (PCA)

Faculty teaching in Core areas of Texts and Ideas (February 17) and Perspectives in the Creative Arts (February 24) are invited to join colleagues for a conversation on assessment in these specific areas. Lunch tickets to The Market Place will be provided.   

"Beyond Pleasure and Pain: The Motivational Implications of Our Misguided Attempts at Predicting
Future Feelings"
Brown Bag Lunch - Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentation by Ali O'Malley, Psychology
Monday, February 14, noon-1 p.m., University Club (AU111)

People tend to be quite bad at predicting how they will feel in the aftermath of events. This is unfortunate, for our predictions about our future feelings - known as affective forecasts - play a role in the decisions we make. Although we know that the affective forecasting process is rife with error, we don't know much about the origins of affective forecasts or their impact on motivation and behavior. Alison O'Malley will discuss her work linking affective forecasts to feedback seeking and performance in organizational and classroom contexts.

Writing Discussion Opportunities for Spring 2011

Coffee and lunch tickets will be available for all attendees. Please RSVP to Rocky Colavito (jcolavit@butler.edu), and click here for more detailed descriptions on upcoming workshops.

Faculty Food for Thought: "Student Disability Services/Counseling"
Thursday, January 27, noon-1 p.m. in AU111, and 4-5 p.m. in JH109

Join Michele Atterson, Director of Student Disability Services, and Keith Magnus, Director of the Counseling Center, to talk about how best to work with students with disabilities; what accommodations are appropriate; what documentation is necessary; and ways that faculty can most successfully work with students who have identified disabilities, or have need of counseling.

For the noon session, meet in the University Club (just outside the south doors of The Market Place) - lunch coupons will be available at the south door of The Market Place in Atherton Union beginning at 11:45 a.m. Refreshments will be available in JH109 for the 4 p.m. session. So that we are best prepared, please RSVP to Rebecca DeGrazia by clicking here by January 26th.

Click the following links to view handouts from this presentation: Butler Faculty and Staff as Helping Resources for Students Student Voice Mental Health and Couseling Survey

BAC and HAC Internal Grants Workshops
Friday, January 21, 10-11 a.m., JH048 - HAC
Friday, January 28, 10-11 a.m., JH048 - BAC
Monday, January 31, 2-3 p.m., JH048 - HAC
Monday, January 31, 3-4 p.m., JH048 - BAC 
Tuesday, February 1, 2-3 p.m., JH048 - BAC
Friday, February 4, 10-11 a.m., JH048 - HAC
Wednesday, February 9, 3-4 p.m., JH048 - HAC
Friday, February 11, 10-11 a.m., JH048 - BAC

These workshops will provide an overview of the two grant programs-eligibility and highlight how they will better support faculty. All faculty members (tenured, tenure track, and non-tenure track) are welcome to attend. The HAC awards grants to eligible faculty working in the sciences and social sciences (quantitative research methods) and the BAC awards grants to eligible faculty working in the fine arts, humanities, and social sciences (qualitative research methods). Refreshments will be provided. If you plan to attend one of the sessions, please RSVP to Bob Holm by clickinghere. (Please note that each of the four workshops for HAC and BAC respectively will cover the same material, so there is no need to attend more than one workshop).

New Faculty Orientation: "Advising Students: What Works, What Doesn't, and How to Get Involved"
Wednesday, January 19, noon-1 p.m., AU111

Please join us for the first ongoing orientation of the new semester - the focus will be on advising students. Jennifer Griggs, Learning Resource Center, and Mary Ramsbottom, Associate Provost of Student Academic Affairs, and Shelly Furuness, College of Education, will share strategies on how to be an effective advisor, and ways you can be involved in early registration of incoming students. 

Fall 2010

"Tending a Difficult Hope"
Brown Bag Lunch - Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentation by Leah Gauthier, Art
Monday, December 6, noon-1 p.m., University Club (AU111)

The time to act is NOW. I mean RIGHT NOW. This earth we live on has changed beyond manageable repair, and there is not another moment to spare to prepare us for the uncertainties that lie ahead. In this Brown Bag session, Leah Gauthier will discuss how we the people have become a nation largely dependent on industry to care for our needs.

"Tending a Difficult Hope" is an artistic journey towards self-sufficiency. Throughout the duration of this work, Leah is learning self-sustaining skills, and teaching them to others through gallery installations, performances and workshops. Her hope is that if we can learn together to live "lightly, carefully, gracefully", maybe, just maybe, we'll gather through what may come, and learn a second chance to make things right.

The Brown Bag Series provides an opportunity for Butler faculty to present their original research, scholarship, and creative work, aimed to speak to both departmental colleagues and those in completely different disciplines. 

Click here to see a pdf version of the poster for this presentation.

"Turning Water into Beer and other Small Miracles"
Friday, December 3, 3 p.m., Johnson Room, Robertson Hall

Join faculty home brewers for a discussion and demonstration on the art and science of beer making. Drs. Hege, Hess, Swenson, and Watts have brewed two batches of a cream ale using the same recipe but different water sources to highlight the role water plays in the brewing process. A tasting of the experimental beers and four other beers (a Northwestern IPA, a Colonial-style big-bad brown ale, a Belgian Tripel, and a Spiced Christmas ale) will be presented for interested parties aged 21 and over. All are invited to participate in the discussion.

Write on Site
Friday, December 3, 11 a.m.- 2 p.m., JH242

Working on finishing a conference paper/article/chapter? Wondering what it might be like to have a supportive writing community? The Brown Bag committee invites Butler faculty to a Write on Site Friday, December 3. Refreshments will be provided.

Write on Sites are opportunities for faculty to spend structured time working on writing projects in community rather than isolation. No exchange of writing expected - just show up and write!

Faculty Food for Thought - Planning for a University Teaching and Learning Center
Thursday, December 2, noon-1 p.m., JH109

Teaching and learning centers emerged at colleges and universities more than 15 years ago and brought together much of the high-quality faculty development work that was happening in multiple areas on campuses. At Butler, faculty development efforts currently come out of each of the colleges and the Provost's Office. As new initiatives are added, and as the needs of faculty continue to evolve, it is time to develop a faculty-driven teaching and learning center, as the strategic plan articulates. A center will provide the leadership, resources, and communication network needed for responsive and responsible faculty development at the University. A center will provide programming that changes and develops according to the focus and interests of the faculty, the needs of students, and the issues confronting us as an institution of higher education.

All faculty are invited to attend in order to share ideas about what a teaching and learning center should be at Butler University. Lunch will be provided. So that we are best prepared, please RSVP to Rebecca DeGrazia by December 1 by clicking here.

If you are unable to attend this session but would like to share your ideas, please send them to Rebecca DeGrazia by clicking here. Click here for more information.
Look for all faculty comments on the easels in the hallway outside JH109 starting December 6. We'll have blank forms available so that you can add additional comments as well. 

New Faculty Orientation: Faculty Activity Reports, Monday, November 29, noon-1 p.m., UClub (AU111) **Please note the change in location**

Learn how to complete the Faculty Activity Report. Meet in the University Club (just outside the south doors of The Market Place) - lunch coupons will be available at the south door of The Market Place in the Atherton Union beginning at 11:45 a.m.

Waters Project Event
"Local Waters = Local Brews", Thursday, November 18, 5 p.m., Krannert Room (Clowes)

More…

Writing Workshops
"Collaborative Activities" - Monday, November 15, 10 a.m., JH031 or Thursday, November 18, 1 p.m., JH031

"Discussion Boards and/in the Writing Class" - Wednesday, November 17, 10 a.m., JH031 or Thursday, November 18, 2:30 p.m., JH031

"Developing (or Tweaking) Your W Course" - Monday, November 29, 10 a.m., JH031 or Tuesday, November 30, 1 p.m., JH083

"On-line Support for W Course Faculty" - Wednesday, December 1, 10 a.m. Location TBA or Thursday, December 2, 1 p.m., Location TBA

Click here for more information on these writing workshops

Open Sessions for Faculty to Begin Planning for a University Teaching and Learning Center

Teaching and Learning Centers emerged at colleges and universities more than 15 years ago and brought together much of the high-quality faculty development work that was happening in multiple areas on campuses. Such centers allow institutions the ability to be responsive to the needs and interests of faculty and provide administrative support to faculty development initiatives. They aid in recruitment and retention of faculty, and indirectly in the recruitment and retention of students.

All faculty are invited to attend one of several sessions in order to share ideas about what a teaching and learning center should be at Butler University. Please drop by JH109 to share your ideas during one of these sessions (refreshments will be available at each session):

Thursday, November 18, 11-noon and noon-1 p.m.

Monday, November 22, 9:30-10:30 a.m.

Thursday, December 2, noon-1 p.m.

If you are unable to attend a session but would like to share your ideas, please send them to Laura Behling by clicking here.

Information Session - "Helping Students Go Global"
Wednesday, November 17, 1 p.m., PB106

Butler faculty and staff play crucial roles in stimulating student interest in study abroad, providing academic advising and, in some cases, developing and leading study-abroad programs. With the goal of helping you to help students go global, Center for Global Education staff will provide an overview of Butler's wide range or study-abroad opportunities as well as basic policies and procedures. They will leave ample time to address any questions regarding study abroad at Butler. Light refreshments will be served.

Faculty Food for Thought: Transforming Teaching through Technology Presentations
Thursday, November 11, noon - 1 p.m., AU302

Join colleagues, Shelly Furuness (Education) and James McGrath (Philosophy and Religion), who participated in the summer "Transforming Teaching through Technology" workshop, present on how they are incorporating technology into their classes. Furuness will present on "digital make-overs" that are helping students articulate and show their thinking process online. McGrath will talk about how he is using electronic texts in his course, "The Bible," and how he is exploring what electronic texts offer us that printed texts cannot.

Lunch from Papa John's will be provided. So that we are best prepared, please RSVP to Rebecca DeGrazia by November 10 by clicking here.

Waters Project Event, "Rivers of India: Population, Pollution and Piety," by David Haberman
Monday, November 8, 6 p.m., JH141

Dr. David Haberman, Professor of Religious Studies at Indiana University Bloomington,  and Dr. Kelly Alley, Professor of Anthropology at Auburn University, will give a lecture on the rivers of India (in conjunction with the Global and Historical Studies).  

New Faculty Orientation: Grant Opportunities
Monday, November 8, noon-1 p.m., JH225

Come learn about the myriad of grant opportunities for your discipline, as well as the internal research, scholarship and creative work grants awarded by Butler.

Open Sessions for Faculty to Begin Planning for a University Teaching and Learning Center

Teaching and Learning Centers emerged at colleges and universities more than 15 years ago and brought together much of the high-quality faculty development work that was happening in multiple areas on campuses. Such centers allow institutions the ability to be responsive to the needs and interests of faculty and provide administrative support to faculty development initiatives. They aid in recruitment and retention of faculty, and indirectly in the recruitment and retention of students.

All faculty are invited to attend one of several sessions in order to share ideas about what a teaching and learning center should be at Butler University. Please drop by JH109 to share your ideas during one of these sessions (refreshments will be available at each session):

Wednesday, November 3, 8:30-9:30 a.m.
Monday, November 8, 4-5 p.m.
Thursday, November 18, 11-noon and noon-1 p.m.
Monday, November 22, 9:30-10:30 a.m.
Thursday, December 2, noon-1 p.m.

If you are unable to attend a session but would like to share your ideas, please send them to Laura Behling by clicking here. Click here for more information.

"More than a Writing Group: Notes from an Active Research Group"

Brown Bag Lunch - Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentation, by Terri Carney, and guests from IUPUI
Monday, November 1, noon-1 p.m., University Club (AU111)

Do you want to increase your scholarly output? Perhaps you would like to develop a more concrete, organized plan to work towards promotion and tenure? This session is for any faculty member who would like to approach their research production in a more organized and supported fashion. In this short session we will address:

- Individuals' typical research trajectories
- Tools to our success; testimonies of "failures"
- Resources for forming your own research group
- The importance of peer mentoring
- Accountability systems to ensure continued production

Click here to view a pdf version of the poster for this session.

Waters Project Event, "Moravian Music," by Sarah Eyerly
Tuesday, October 26, 7:30 p.m., Edison-Duckwall Recital Hall

Throughout history, blood has been described as the "water of life" [aqua vitae], and it is through this lens that the improvised singing of the Moravians can be viewed.  Like many religious communities throughout history, members of the eighteenth-century utopias of the Moravian church crafted rituals of self-transformation that arrested participants through the senses.  Moravian believers longed to be caressed and cradled inside Christ's body, pierced and gashed by thorns and nails, their mouths overflowing with blood.

They sang together softly, prostrate upon the floor, meditating upon graphic representations of the suffering Christ. In the ecstasy of these communal rituals, worshippers improvised hymns. Improvisation was a religious practice, and demonstrated a commitment of body, mind, and soul to the community.  Improvised singing cast an aural boundary around the community. Through this improvised communal singing, Moravians connected the inward (physical) and outward (spiritual) realm into one harmonious creation.  In the words of one hymn, "Their mouths were filled with blood, and they sang together in joyful union with the heavenly spheres."

The concert will begin with a 30-minute lecture on the musical practices of the Moravian church. Then, audience members will witness an actual improvised service, called a Singstunde [singing hour].  The participants in the Singstunde will be Dr. Sarah Eyerly, 16 student singers, and an organist.  During the service, graphic 18th-century artworks created by Moravians to accompany their singing will be projected on the back of the stage.  These artworks depict the blood and suffering of Christ in intensely personal ways: little wound bees burrowing into Christ's wounds, cups, tables, and chairs portrayed inside Christ's side wound, stages of the decaying body of Christ, and worshippers bathing in the blood of Christ.  The audience will also be encouraged to sing at certain points in the concert.

Following the concert Lovefeast buns (traditional buns served by Moravians during Singstunden) and coffee will be served.

Developing Budgets for Grant Proposals Workshop
Tuesday, October 26, 3-4 p.m., JH048 or Friday, October 29, 10-11 a.m., JH048

Are you planning on writing a grant proposal? If so, you will need to create a budget. Dana Ohren will be offering two workshops on developing budgets for grant proposals. Please RSVP to Dana Ohren by clicking here and be sure to indicate which session you would like to attend.

This event is sponsored by the Butler Institute for Research and Scholarship (BIRS). For more information about the Institute, including its calendar of events and deadlines, please visit our website at www.butler.edu/birs.

New Faculty Orientation: Fitting the Curricular Pieces Together
Monday, October 25, noon-1 p.m., JH225

Majors and minors, concentrations and the Core. Mindy Welch (College of Education) will join us for a conversation on how the curriculum works at Butler, particularly during this advising time.

Lunch from Jimmy Johns will be provided.

Faculty Sherry Hour
Thursday, October 21, 4 p.m., University Club, AU111
Wednesday, November 17, 4 p.m., University Club, AU111

President Fong invites you to Faculty Sherry Hour - an occasion for faculty to gather across programs and colleges for conviviality and conversation. Reminders will come by email from the President's office about two weeks in advance. Please contact Ellen Clark (eclark@butler.edu) with any questions.

"Banging your Head Against Buildings: Differences in Window Strikes Between Downtown and Suburban Birds and Prospects for Saving our Fine Feathered Friends."
Brown Bag Lunch - Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentation, by Chris Hess
Wednesday, October 20, noon-1 p.m., University Club (AU111)

Just days after arriving on campus, Chris Hess started to notice a high frequency of birds dying from window collisions on campus and started collecting data on when, where and what species were most at risk. Hess will discuss the results of these studies as well as compare them to data gathered by the Amos Butler Audubon Society for buildings in downtown Indianapolis. He will end with a discussion of options aimed at decreasing the frequency of window strikes and a possible experiment that will begin at Butler over the next year.

Click here to view a pdf version of the poster for this session.

Waters Project Event, "Maiden Voyage," by Matt Pivec and the Faculty Jazz Combo and Guests
Tuesday, October 19, 7:30 p.m. (pre-concert lecture @ 7:00 pm), Edison-Duckwall Recital Hall

Matt Pivec (JCFA) and the Faculty Jazz Combo, along with guest musicians, will perform the songs from Maiden Voyage, an album by the famed jazz pianist Herbie Hancock.  The five tone poems that comprise this album have become standards in the jazz repertoire.  Furthermore, the album as a whole is considered a "must listen" for jazz musicians and aficionados.  

Each of Hancock's five pieces depicts a particular aspect of a sea voyage.  In Hancock's own words from the original album cover:

The sea has often stirred the imagination of creative minds involved in all spheres of art.  There still exists an element of mystery which surrounds the sea and living aquatic creations which provide it with its vital essence.  Atlantis, the Sargasso Sea, giant serpents, and mermaids are only a few of the many folkloric mysteries which have evolved through man's experience with the sea.

This music attempts to capture its vastness and majesty, the splendor of a sea-going vessel on its maiden voyage, the graceful beauty of the playful dolphins, the constant struggle for survival of even the tiniest sea creatures, and the awesome destructive power of the hurricane, nemesis of seamen. 

Each of the five pieces is frequently performed individually. However, they are rarely performed as a complete unit.  The Butler Faculty Jazz Combo will perform the pieces from Maiden Voyage in the order they were presented on the original album.  Prior to the formal performance, Dr. Pivec will present a brief pre-concert lecture.  The purpose of the lecture is to provide the audience with background knowledge through which to better understand the performance. In particular, he will discuss the specific musical devices and themes that Hancock uses to depict his vision of a vessel's maiden voyage.

"Intellectual Property Rights: Research, Copyrights, Publications, and Patents"
Tuesday, October 19, 3-4 p.m. Johnson Room, Robertson Hall

Homer Faucett III, an associate in Ice Miller's Intellectual Property Practice Group, will be presenting on intellectual property rights, with special attention paid to how they apply to research and scholarship. Come learn about how intellectual property rights relate to your work, and have some coffee too. Please RSVP to Dana Ohren by October 11 clicking here.

This event is sponsored by the Butler Institute for Research and Scholarship. For more information about the Institute, including its calendar of events and deadlines, please visit our website at www.butler.edu/birs.

New Faculty Orientation: Working with Diverse Learners and Learning Styles
Monday, October 11, noon - 1 p.m., JH225

How can faculty best work with the variety of students who come into classes who may have different knowledge levels and skills? What are ways to best capitalize on and support the diverse experiences students bring to class? How might assignments be structured to allow students to do their best work, or how can class time be managed, particularly when differences of opinion or experience surface?

Click here to view documents related to this discussion.

Wednesday, October 6: Understanding Your IDEA Center Course Evaluations

In spring 2010, most Butler faculty administered the IDEA Center course evaluation forms for the first time. Join experts from the IDEA Center to help you understand how best to use the Summary Reports of your scores and how best to fine-tune (if necessary) the Objectives on the Faculty Information Form; they'll also be able to answer questions you might have about how scores are calculated.

To better accommodate schedules, we'll offer multiple sessions:

9-10:30 a.m. - an open session for all faculty in the Ford Salon, Robertson Hall

Noon-1 p.m. - a targeted session for department chairs and program directors, as well as for any faculty member, in the Ford Salon, Robertson Hall

2:30-4 p.m. - an open session for all faculty (repeat of the 9 a.m. session) in PB204

All faculty may attend any session. We will have light refreshments available at all three sessions; please feel free to bring your lunch if attending the noon session. So that we can best prepare, please RSVP to Rebecca DeGrazia by clicking here, indicating which session you plan on attending.

Please plan to bring your Summary Reports with you as references; if you are new to the University, we will have a sample Summary Report for you to use.

Information on IDEA Center course evaluations is available online at www.theideacenter.org, including "Notes on Instruction," "Interpretive Guide on IDEA Diagnostic Form Report," and "Interpreting Adjusted Ratings of Outcomes."

Click here to view the PowerPoint presentation from this session.

Faculty Food for Thought: How to Incorporate the Collegiate Newspaper Readership Program into Your Classes
Thursday, September 23, 11 a.m.-noon AND noon-1 p.m., JH183

Consider incorporating The New York Times, USA Today, or The Indianapolis Star into your courses as a learning resource and living text - the newspapers are delivered to campus on weekdays. The papers engage students every day by letting them make connections between what they study in their coursework and the events, issues and trends playing out across the pages of the newspaper. Faculty who require The New York Times as part of a course can receive their own complimentary copy Monday through Friday for the duration of the course. To receive your complimentary Monday through Friday subscription, send Kandace Rusnak (kandace.rusnak@pcfcorp.com) of The New York Times a copy of your syllabus including The Times, along with your delivery address and phone number.

Join representatives of readership programs to learn how faculty are using the newspapers to enhance their students' classroom experiences. To better accommodate schedules, we'll offer two sessions: 11 a.m. to noon, or noon to 1 p.m. in AU326. Lunch provided. So that we are best prepared, please RSVP to Rebecca DeGrazia (rdegrazi@butler.edu) by September 22.

"Perspectives on Microfinance: Evolution and Revolution"
Brown Bag Lunch - Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentation by Larry Lad and Sheryl Ann Stephen
Wednesday, September 22, noon-1 p.m., University Club, AU111

A revolution is catching on. Even during the current global financial turmoil, microfinance and micro-lending has drawn increased attention in both popular business press and academic research. This Brown Bag session will trace the evolution of microcredit, and offer a range of perspectives on its potential and practice including both international and local examples. Where possible, we intend to engage the group in an interdisciplinary discussion about how we can move from "third person" observers to "first person" doers in this movement. Click here to view a poster for this session.

The Brown Bag Series provides an opportunity for Butler faculty to present their original research, scholarship, and creative work, aimed to speak to both departmental colleagues and those in completely different disciplines. 

Faculty Sherry Hour
Wednesday, September 15, 4 p.m., University Club, AU111
Thursday, October 21, 4 p.m., University Club, AU111
Wednesday, November 17, 4 p.m., University Club, AU111

President Fong invites you to Faculty Sherry Hour - an occasion for faculty to gather across programs and colleges for conviviality and conversation. Reminders will come by email from the President's office about two weeks in advance. Please contact Ellen Clark (eclark@butler.edu) with any questions.

Introduction to the Grant Process Workshop
Tuesday, September 14, 3-4 p.m., JH048
Or Friday, September 17, 10-11 a.m., JH048.

Do you need money to conduct research, develop a course or implement a program? The Butler Institute for Research and Scholarship (BIRS) is offering a workshop series about the best practices for developing proposals for external funding. The first workshop, Introduction to the Grant Process, will be offered twice: September 14 and September 17. Refreshments will be provided. To reserve a seat, please RSVP to Dana Ohren at dohren@butler.edu, indicating which session you plan to attend in your email. For a complete list of BIRS events, please visit /birs.

New Faculty Orientation: Guiding Class Discussions
Monday, September 13, noon-1 p.m., location pending

New faculty academic-year orientation session on guiding class discussions, engaging students in classes, and employing active learning techniques for your classes. Lunch will be provided.

Click here to view handouts from this session.

Writing Pedagogy Workshops for September 2010

Coffee and lunch tickets will be available for all attendees. Enrollment is limited to 10 for each workshop. Please RSVP to Rocky Colavito (rcolavit@butler.edu) for any of the workshops you wish to attend.

Click here for a more detailed description on all workshops listed.

Monday, the 13th, 10-11 a.m. or Tuesday, the 14th, 2-3 p.m. (JH083): Information Literacy in W Courses
Wednesday, the 15th, 10-11 a.m. or Thursday, the 16th, 2-3 p.m. (JH083): Sneaky Ways to Embed Writing Instruction
Monday, the 20th, 10-11 a.m. or Tuesday, the 21st, 2-3 p.m. (JH031): Ways to Streamline Grading
Wednesday, the 22nd, 10-11 a.m. or Thursday, the 23rd, 2-3 p.m. (JH031): Writing in Service Learning Courses
Monday, the 27th, 10-11 a.m. or Tuesday, the 28th, 2-3 p.m. (JH083): Wrestling the Grammar Beast
Wednesday, the 29th, 10-11 a.m. or Thursday, the 30th, 2-3 p.m. (JH083): Alternatives to the Research Paper 

"Explaining Nature, Explaining History"
Brown Bag Lunch - Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentations
Stuart Glennan, Philosophy
Wednesday, September 8, noon-1 p.m., AU302

What if anything is the connection between the explanatory methods of historians and natural scientists? Some philosophers have argued that the nature of the subject matter in history and the "human sciences" demands a special methodology, while others claim that historical explanations, if they are to really explain things, must emulate the explanatory techniques of the natural sciences. Stuart Glennan (Philosophy) will argue that the explanations in the natural sciences (especially biology) have more in common with explanations in history than is commonly supposed. Biologists (especially evolutionary biologists) are concerned with historical questions, and like historians their explanations often utilize narrative. Certain problems that have been raised about the legitimacy of narrative explanation in both history and the natural sciences can be solved if we understand narratives as descriptions of something Stuart calls an "ephemeral mechanism."

The Brown Bag Series provides an opportunity for Butler faculty to present their original research, scholarship, and creative work, aimed to speak to both departmental colleagues and those in completely different disciplines. 

New Faculty Academic-Year Orientation Session
Wednesday, September 1, noon-1 p.m., AU302

All new faculty are invited to this first academic-year orientation session - this is a time to reconnect, look at the semester ahead, and ask and get answers to questions that may have arisen from the start of classes. The conversation will be held in AU302 from noon to 1 p.m. - lunch coupons for the Market Place will be available outside of AU302 beginning at 11:45 a.m.

FYS Summer Workshop
August 9-11, 2010

This Summer Workshop is designed to help FYS faculty develop strategies for teaching reading, writing, listening, speaking, and critical thinking to first year students, cultivate their own abilities as readers, writers, and scholars, and foster community with their FYS colleagues. Participants will also have opportunities to revise and refine their syllabi.

Our aim is that participants will come away from the Summer Workshop with a renewed sense of excitement about and commitment to the teaching of the First Year Seminar, a firmer grasp of the processes of reading, writing, and thinking, as well as the pedagogies that support their development in first year students.

Attendees will receive either a stipend or course development funds for their participation in the workshop.

Please RSVP to Rebecca DeGrazia at  rdegrazi@butler.edu  by August 4 if you are interested in attending.        

Transforming Teaching with Technology
August 2-4, 2010

In collaboration with the Office of Instructional Technology, the Faculty Development Program invites faculty to participate this summer in a workshop designed to help you transform your teaching through technology. During this workshop, you will:

  • Explore the relationship between pedagogy and technology
  • Consider how we think about teaching and learning when partnered with 21st-century students
  • Develop course materials using technology
  • Collaborate with colleagues about appropriate uses of technology in courses

Faculty will have the opportunity during the workshop to enhance or develop a specific course in which technology is best utilized, and engage in substantive conversation with colleagues from across the University. Participants will receive a stipend or allowance for a technology purchase for use in courses. For additional information, including the application (deadline is April 8), please click here.

Writing in Indianapolis Community Requirement and Service-Learning Courses, Summer Writing Workshop
Tuesday, July 27 and Wednesday, July 28, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., JH301

With new guidelines in place regarding the Indianapolis Community Requirement and Service-Learning courses for students, faculty now find available a new way to engage students with both the community and the ways in which writing can be put to work in practical, community-based service projects. Come and share ideas about how to use writing in tandem with service work, consider how to evaluate such work, and develop new activities that can encourage students to write as part of service projects. Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to Rocky Colavito by clicking here.

Information Literacy and Writing Intensive Courses, Summer Writing Workshop
Wednesday, July 21 and Thursday, July 22, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., JH083

Assignments requiring research activities are prevalent in many W courses; come and learn from your colleagues about the different options available to you beyond (but not forgetting) the traditional scholarly research paper. We will discuss library support for your classes, alternatives to the traditional research paper, collaborative activities that include research, and general guidelines for promoting information literacy in your classes. Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to Rocky Colavito by clicking here.

2009-2010 ~ Show Events

Spring 2010

First Year Seminar - Faculty Development Conversations
May 5-7, 2010

The First Year Seminar Program, in collaboration with the Faculty Development Program, invites all faculty who are teaching a FYS in 2010-11 (one semester or two) to participate in a three-day structured conversation about teaching first-year students in the FYS program.

Topics include:

  • Best practices in the teaching of writing, oral communication, research skills, and other learning objectives of the program
  • Collaborative possibilities, including shared readings, or ways two or more seminars might come together on common themes, assignments, assessments, or other components of the program
  • Effective pedagogies, evaluations of student learning, and experiences in teaching in the program

Faculty also will have the opportunity to develop course materials for their FYS and share ideas in a workshop format; participants will receive a stipend or a course development grant. For more information, including how to participate, please click here.

"Celebrate the Scholarship of New Faculty"
Butler Brown Lunch - Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentations
Monday, April 26, noon-1 p.m., University Club, AU111

Join us for the final Brown Bag Lunch session of the semester, a roundtable discussion with new faculty from around the university. Sarah Eyerly (Music), Leah Gauthier (Art Program), and Robin Turner (Political Science) will briefly present on their research.

The Brown Bag Series provides an opportunity for Butler faculty to present their original research, scholarship, and creative work, aimed to speak to both departmental colleagues and those in completely different disciplines.  Beverages and dessert provided by the Office of the Provost.

Sunset End-of-the-Year Party
Thursday, April 22, 7-9 p.m., the Skyline Club

Join your Butler colleagues as we watch the sun set on another productive and successful academic year. Faculty are invited to attend this celebration (along with your spouse or partner), hosted by the Office of the Provost and the Sunset Project Committee at the Skyline Club downtown. The winners of the Sunset Project awards will be announced, artwork related to the Sunset Project will be on display, and JCFA's Dr. Matthew Pivec will lead a student jazz ensemble as they perform music on the theme of the event.

Celebratory beverages and light appetizers will be served. The Skyline Club is located on the top floor of One American Square (formerly the AUL Tower). One America Square is bordered by Capitol Ave. and Illinois St. to the east and west, and New York St. and Ohio St. to the north and south. Parking is available in the building's underground garage or on the street. Space is limited - please RSVP to Monica Strigari by Wednesday, April 14 by clicking here.  

The Sunset of Suntanning? Revisiting the Bronze Age
Wednesday, April 21, noon-1 p.m., GH108

A discussion with Jo Ellen Jacobs, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Millikin University, about the history and aesthetics of Western's women's (somewhat recent and unique) obsession with tanning, considering issues related to class, race, culture, and gender. There promises to be lots of show and tell; Dr. Jacobs has dolls, gloves, potions and more! Professors Elizabeth Mix and Ageeth Sluis will respond. The symposium is co-sponsored by the Department of Philosophy and Religion and the Sunset Project, and is free and open to all members of the Butler community. Jimmy John's sandwiches will be available to the first 50 people to arrive. 

Faculty Sherry Hour
Thursday, April 15, 4-5:30 p.m., University Club, AU111

President Fong invites you to Faculty Sherry Hour - an occasion for faculty to gather across programs and colleges for conviviality and conversation. Please contact Ellen Clark (eclark@butler.edu) with any questions.

New Faculty Orientation: Reflecting and Evaluating the Year
Wednesday, April 14, noon-1 p.m., University Club, AU111

Please join your colleagues for the last New Faculty Orientation lunch of the year. In addition to reflecting on the year, you'll be asked to provide feedback on new faculty opportunities and suggestions to help next year's group of new faculty have a successful transition.

Meet in the University Club (just outside the south doors of The Market Place) - lunch coupons will be available at the south door of The Market Place in Atherton Union beginning at 11:45 a.m.  

Intellectual Property Rights Presentation
April 6, 3-4 p.m., Johnson Room, Robertson Hall

Join Homer Faucett III, an associate in Ice Miller's Intellectual Property Practice Group, for a discussion on Intellectual Property Rights, with special attention paid to how they apply to research and scholarship. Come learn about how intellectual property rights relate to your work and have some coffee too. Please RSVP to Dana Ohren by April 1 by clicking here

The Place of Peer and Group Work in the Writing Class
March 31, noon-1 p.m. or Thursday, April 1,12:15-1:15 p.m., JH083

This brown bag workshop will address ways we can better get students to work together in writing intensive courses in ways that go beyond peer evaluation (which will receive attention). Topics for sharing and discussion include group work to facilitate the writing process, collaborative assignments (both formal and informal), and approaches to evaluating these sorts of projects. So that we are best prepared, please RSVP to Rocky Colavito by clicking here.

New Faculty Orientation: When They're Not in Class - Student Life at Butler
Wednesday, March 24, noon-1 p.m., University Club, AU111

Join Irene Stevens, Dean of Student Life, and Sally Click, Dean of Student Services, to learn more about our students, who they are, what they do outside of their classes, and the programs and support that exist for them.

Meet in the University Club (just outside the south doors of The Market Place) - lunch coupons will be available at the south door of The Market Place in Atherton Union beginning at 11:45 a.m.  

Click here for handouts from this presentation.

Instructional Technology session: The Webpage You are Looking for CAN be Found
Monday, March 22, 1-2 p.m., JH041

This session, led by James McGrath, Associate Professor of Religion and in collaboration with Brad Matthies from the library, will introduce faculty and other interested parties to the Internet Archive (www.archive.org), its use, and the resources available there. Attendees will have the opportunity to try out the site and look for resources of the particular sort most relevant to their own needs and interests. Please visit /absolutenm/templates/?a=1588&z=24 for further information and to register for the session.

Writing Workshop: The Writing Process in the Writing Class
Monday, March 22, noon-1 p.m., JH174
OR Tuesday, March 23, 12:15-1:15 p.m., JH083

All faculty are invited to this brown bag workshop to share ideas about how to integrate the writing process into your courses. This workshop will consider how to use informal writing as the basis for longer formal assignments, examine the place of writing within the scope of classroom activities, and consider ways to model and teach the process of revision. So that we are best prepared, please RSVP to Rocky Colavito by clicking here.

First Year Seminar - Faculty Development Lunch Conversation: FYS Student Survival/Success Stories
Monday, March 22, noon-1 p.m., JH083

All FYS instructors are invited to attend this conversation. This faculty development series is meant to be discussion based, not instruction based. All faculty attending the lunch time conversations are welcome and encouraged to bring "what works for you" ideas along with questions and curiosities. Lunch is provided. Please RSVP to Angela Hofstetter by clicking here.

Sunset Project: The First Sunset: Cosmology in the Ancient World and Genesis One
Thursday, March 18, 6 p.m., Johnson Room, Robertson Hall

John Walton, Professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College (Illinois), and author of The Lost World of Genesis One: Ancient Cosmology and the Origins Debate, will talk about the interpretation of creation narratives in the Bible.  A related event, involving a faculty response, will occur on March 31st at noon in the same room.  This lecture is sponsored by the Department of Philosophy and Religion and will be co-sponsored by the Sunset Project.  Free and open to the public.

Faculty Sherry Hour
Thursday, March 18, 4-5:30 p.m., University Club, AU111
Thursday, April 15, 4-5:30 p.m., University Club, AU111

President Fong invites you to Faculty Sherry Hour - an occasion for faculty to gather across programs and colleges for conviviality and conversation. Reminders will come by email from the President's office about two weeks in advance. Please contact Ellen Clark (eclark@butler.edu) with any questions. 

Brown Bag Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentation
"The Holocaust and Me" presented by Hilene Flanzbaum, Professor of English
Wednesday, March 17, noon-1 p.m., University Club, AU111

The Holocaust and Me, a memoir, traces Hilene Flanzbaum's relationship to the twentieth century's most defining moment. From her childhood, where she met relatives that are survivors but do not know they are, to her 49th year when she went to France to reconfigure the stories of their survival. This book explores the treatment and representation of the Holocaust in American culture. It also reflects on persistent questions that many Jewish-Americans face today: What special connection do I have to this event Americans termed the Holocaust? Is it different from the connection that non-Jewish Americans feel? Have Jewish Americans, the overwhelming majority that did not experience the Holocaust, accrued benefits for identifying with this event? And how has that identification been culturally constructed, packaged, and delivered to Americans, both Jewish and not?

The Brown Bag Series provides an opportunity for Butler faculty to present their original research, scholarship, and creative work, aimed to speak to both departmental colleagues and those in completely different disciplines. 

Interested in leading a Brown Bag Lunch presentation? Please contact Vivian Deno at vdeno@butler.edu

First Wednesday Coffee Break
Wednesday, March 3, 2:30-4:30 p.m., JH109 **Please note the change in time**

Join friends and colleagues for our next First Wednesday Coffee Break. When you hit that mid-afternoon lull, come over to Jordan Hall 109 - we'll have coffee and tea and a variety of cookies. Come when you can, stay as long as you'd like.

"Drugs, Work and Capitalism: The Governing of Affect" presented by Kristen Swenson
Brown Bag Lunch - Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentations
Wednesday, March 3, noon-1 p.m., University Club, AU111

Join Kristen Swenson for a discussion exploring the intersections between lifestyle pharmaceuticals, work and affect. Kristen examines the discourse of lifestyle medication such as anti-depressant advertisements along the side of public policy documents, including George W. Bush's "New Freedom Initiative on Mental Health."

 The Brown Bag Series provides an opportunity for Butler faculty to present their original research, scholarship, and creative work, aimed to speak to both departmental colleagues and those in completely different disciplines.

Interested in leading a Brown Bag Lunch presentation? Please contact Vivian Deno at vdeno@butler.edu
The Sunset and the Dawn: Idioms of Native American Death and Renewal in Public Culture
Monday, March 1, 3 p.m., AU326

Casey Kelly, from the Department of Communication Studies, and Butler students Katherine Adams, Katie Clark, Rachael Essig, and Brandon Ng will discuss two antagonistic metaphors employed to represent Native Americans: the sunset and the dawn. Whereas the perceived deadline of Native American cultures was represented by foreboding yet sentimental imaginary sunsets, Native activists in the 20th century provided the idiom of "dawn" to represent rebirth and resistance.

New Faculty Orientation: Understanding and Getting Involved - Faculty Governance
Wednesday, February 24, noon-1 p.m., University Club, AU111

Join Jeanne VanTyle, Chair of Faculty Senate; Lee Garver, Chair of University Curriculum Committee; and Margaretha Geertsema, Chair of the Academic Affairs Committee for a conversation about how faculty governance works at Butler. They'll go over the committee structure, how faculty decisions get made, how the election or appointment process works, and suggest ways for you to get involved.

Click here for handouts from this presentation. 

Faculty Food for Thought: Working with Students with Disabilities
Thursday, February 18, noon-1 p.m., University Club, AU111

Join Michele Atterson, Director of Student Disability Services to talk about how best to work with students with disabilities; what accommodations are appropriate; what documentation is necessary; and ways that faculty can most successfully work with students who have identified disabilities.

Click here for handouts from this presentation.

"Duping the Man: Rethinking the Tradition of the Clever Slave in Plautus", presented by Chris Bungard
Brown Bag Lunch - Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentations
Tuesday, February 16, noon-1 p.m., University Club, AU111

Roman comedies generally follow an easy pattern: boy loves girl he cannot have; clever slave concocts schemes to help boy; boy gets girl. Since the 1980's work of Niall Slater, scholars have typically read the clever slave as the author of the plot. Chris Bungard's research seeks to re-understand the clever slave not as ones who control their plots (i.e. authors as controllers of meaning), but as characters who are constantly adapting to the situation (i.e. a participant who must negotiate meaning). In this Brown Bag, Chris Bungard will look at the clever slaves of Plautus' Pseudolus and Miles Gloriosus.

The Brown Bag Series provides an opportunity for Butler faculty to present their original research, scholarship, and creative work, aimed to speak to both departmental colleagues and those in completely different disciplines.  Beverages and dessert provided by the Office of the Provost.

Writing Pedagogy Workshops
Monday, February 15, noon-1:30, JH083
Tuesday, February 16, noon-1:30, JH083

This workshop will address the implementation of reflective writing within the curriculum, and consider strategies for implementing and evaluating informal and formal writing designated to foster reflection upon critical analysis of course content and student experiences. We will also consider the place of reflective writing within the e-portfolio initiatives. Come and share your experiences, strategies, and resources for using this significant exercise in your classes and see how it translates to others. Please plan to bring your lunch. So that we are best prepared, please RSVP to Rocky Colavito by clicking here.

Sunset Project Event: Imaginary Sunsets

Wednesday, February 10, 3-4 p.m., Johnson Room, Robertson Hall

A literary hour, hosted by the English Department, with readings from literature, poetry, and some original works, around the theme of sunsets. Light refreshments will be available.

New Faculty Orientation: Interdisciplinary Programs, Honors Program

Wednesday, February 10, noon-1 p.m., University Club, AU111 

Join us for a discussion with the Interdisciplinary Program Directors: Siobhan McEvoy-Levy (Peace Studies), Antonio Menendez (International Studies), Carol Reeves (Science, Technology and Society) and Ann Savage (Gender Studies); and Lisa Markus, Program Coordinator for the Honors Program. Meet in the University Club (just outside the south doors of The Market Place). Lunch coupons will be available at the south door of The Market Place in Atherton Union beginning at 11:45 a.m.

Click on the following links for handouts from the session:  Gender Studies; Honors Program Faculty Handbook; Honors at a Glance; International Studies; Science, Technology and Society;

Celebration of Scholarship and Creative Activity Reception

Thursday, February 4, 5:30 p.m., Irwin Library

Butler Libraries is hosting the 9th Annual Celebration of Scholarship and Creative Activity.  The Celebration is a semi-formal reception where faculty will have the opportunity to view their colleagues' academic scholarship from the past few years. 

The Celebration of Scholarship is being held this year in conjunction with the installation of Butler's Phi Beta Kappa chapter.  An electronic invitation for the Phi Beta Kappa installation will be forthcoming to all faculty; however, so please mark your calendars for the Phi Beta Kappa installation ceremony on February 4th at 4:30 p.m. in the Atherton Union, Reilly Room.  After the ceremony, the Celebration of Scholarship reception will commence, and Dr. John Churchill, Secretary of the National Phi Beta Kappa Society, will provide a keynote address at 6:30 p.m. in Irwin.

Irwin Library accepts and puts on display scholarship materials that would be included in an annual or tenure review (books, articles, performances, recordings, etc.).  If you have materials that you would like to share, go to /library/celebration for more details and submission forms.  The deadline for submission is Friday, January 15

First Wednesday Coffee Break

Wednesday, February 3, 10-11 a.m., JH109

Join friends and colleagues for our first First Wednesday Coffee Break of the semester. When you hit that mid-morning lull, come over to Jordan Hall 109 - we'll have coffee and tea and a variety of cookies. Come when you can, stay as long as you'd like. "Bring me a bowl of coffee before I turn into a goat" - Johann Sebastian Bach

"Journeys to Others and Lessons to Self: Carlos Castaneda, Heterotopia, and Indigenous Masculinity at the End of the Mexican Revolution"

Brown Bag Lunch - Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentation by Ageeth Sluis

Wednesday, February 3, noon-1 p.m., University Club, AU111

During the 1970's, Carlos Castaneda's series on shamanism introduced a large U.S. readership to Mexico at the end of the Mexican Miracle, a period of rapid economic decline. Yet, this was also a time when the country saw the growth of an alternative tourism industry that fit Castaneda's "lessons" on the nature of reality as representing a journey inward as a turn away from U.S.-style consumerism. Castaneda's positioning of a "separate reality" predicated on an indigenous worldview was geared to a larger world, and spoke especially to a global middle-class youth culture based on ennui with material increase. Due to their global reach and counterculture success, Castaneda's books also became popular in Mexico with Mexican youth. While heavily criticized by contemporary anthropologists as pseudo-science, Castaneda's best-selling books became instrumental in the construction of an imagined Mexico, which-besides drawing "counterculture tourists" to the jungles of Oaxaca in search of hallucinogens and spiritual enlightenment-also featured a new way of conceptualizing race and gender.

The Brown Bag Series provides an opportunity for Butler faculty to present their original research, scholarship, and creative work, aimed to speak to both departmental colleagues and those in completely different disciplines.  Beverages and dessert provided by the Office of the Provost.

Faculty Food for Thought: SENCER

Thursday, January 28, noon-1 p.m., University Club, AU111

Join Joe Kirsch (Chemistry), Tara Lineweaver (Psychology), and Phil Villani (Biological Sciences) for a discussion on SENCER. Meet in the University Club (just outside the south doors of The Market Place) - lunch coupons will be available at the south door of The Market Place in Atherton Union beginning at 11:45 a.m. Seating is limited. Please RSVP to Rebecca DeGrazia by clicking here.

Click here to view a copy of handouts from the presentation.

Internship Coordinator and Faculty Appreciation Luncheon

Wednesday, January 27, noon-1 p.m.,  Johnson Room, Robertson Hall

The staff of the Internship and Career Services (ICS) office cordially invite faculty to a luncheon to show their appreciation for all you do to help Butler's students and graduates succeed. During the luncheon, ICS will provide information about their services and how they serve the campus community, as well as share some of their many success stories of working with students, alumni, faculty and staff over the years. Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to Julie Schrader by Tuesday, January 26 by clicking here.

Writing Pedagogy Workshops

Tuesday, January 26, noon-1:30, JH083  

Wednesday, January 27, noon-1:30, JH174

Perplexed by the discrepancy between their errors and your expectations? Wondering what to do in order to bring about change? Want to spend less of your grading time on modeling how your students should be editing their work? Explore these questions and share potential solutions with your colleagues in this workshop. Come ready to share your strategies (handouts you use would be greatly appreciated) for dealing with error issues in your students' writing, and help us all come away with lots of ideas to try out in an effort to improve student awareness of the place of grammar in formal and informal writing. Please plan to bring your lunch. So that we are best prepared, please RSVP to Rocky Colavito by clicking here.

CANCELLED - Core Curriculum Seminar on Pedagogy and Community

Wednesday, January 20, 2-4:30 p.m., HB121

Do you want to participate in a forum to discuss the philosophy and pedagogical principles underlying the core curriculum? Do you want to share ideas about teaching and learning in the core? Do you want to engage in dialogue and collaboration that results in higher levels of learning for all students, and especially, for those students who are struggling and/or who are under served?

Join Mark Cosand, Butler Shortridge Liaison, for a series of sessions using the critical friends framework and proven protocols designed just for the purpose of building trust, exploring texts and examining student work. Through critical friendship, educators share resources and ideas, support each other in implementing new practices, and build relationships among colleagues characterized by mutual trust and freedom from judgment, while keeping a keen focus on issues of equity.

This group will meet every other Wednesday, January 20 through April 14, from 2-4:30 p.m. Refreshments will be served. RSVP to Rebecca DeGrazia by clicking here.

New Faculty Orientation: Technology and Advising

Wednesday, January 20, noon-1 p.m., University Club, AU111

Join Julianne Miranda and Elise Edwards to learn about opportunities to incorporate technology into your teaching, and resources and equipment that you can use. Dr. Carol Hagans, Associate Provost for Student Academic Affairs, also will provide information on the upcoming new student registration and how you can be involved in advising. Meet in the University Club (just outside the south doors of The Market Place) - lunch coupons will be available at the south door of The Market Place in Atherton Union beginning at 11:45 a.m.

Please mark your calendar for our upcoming New Faculty Orientation sessions this spring: February 10, February 24, March 24 and April 14.

"Celebrate the Scholarship of New Faculty"

Brown Bag Lunch - Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentations

Tuesday, December 8, 12:30-1:30 p.m., University Club (AU111)

Please join us for the final Brown Bag Lunch session of the semester, a roundtable discussion with new faculty from around the university. Daniel Abbott (College of Education), Kristen Hoerl (Communication Studies), and Alex Quintanilla Aguilar (Modern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures) will briefly present on their research.

Research Writing Workshop

Tuesday, December 8, 12:30-2 p.m., JH172

We all know of the traditional research paper that requires students to undertake independent scholarly research in an effort to develop an essay that purports to stand on its own as a piece of scholarship. What we very often get is something of a completely different species. This workshop will address techniques for teaching the research process, and present alternatives to the traditional lengthy scholarly essay. 

Writing Grant Proposals and Building Budgets Workshops

Thursday, December 3, 10-11 a.m., JH048

and Friday, December 4, 10-11 a.m., JH048

The Butler Institute for Research and Scholarship (BIRS) will be offering two more workshops this semester. At the Writing Grant Proposals workshop, Thursday, December 3rd, you will learn the best practices for writing grant and fellowship proposals. The Building Budgets workshop on Friday, December 4th will teach you the ins and outs of developing grant budgets. Please visit the BIRS website (www.butler.edu/birs) for a complete calendar of their events.

Ethics and Issues at the Sunset of Life

Wednesday, December 2, noon-1 p.m., Johnson Room, Robertson Hall

The entire Butler community is invited to the second Sunset lunchtime symposium. Professors Jane Gervasio (COPHS), Dick McGowan (COB), and Priscilla Ryder (COPHS) will discuss their research on gerontology.

First Wednesday Coffee Break

Wednesday, December 2, 2:30-4:30 p.m., JH109 Faculty Lounge

Join friends and colleagues for our end of the fall semester First Wednesday Coffee Break. When you hit that afternoon lull, come over to Jordan Hall 109 - we'll have coffee and tea and a variety of cookies. Come when you can, stay as long as you'd like, and congratulate one another on a semester well done. "If you want to improve your understanding, drink coffee; it is the intelligent beverage" - Sydney Smith (1771-1845, English writer)

New Faculty Orientation: Faculty Activity Report and Course Evaluations

Wednesday, November 18, noon-1 p.m., University Club (AU111)

Please plan on attending to learn about how course evaluations work and how to complete the Faculty Activity Report.

Faculty Food for Thought: ePortfolios

Thursday, November 12, noon-1 p.m., University Club (AU111)

The implementation of ePortfolio began last year, with the fall of 2009 marking the first wide-spread adoption of ePortfolio in the First Year Seminar. Join us for an information session about the university vision for ePortfolio, its use in the First Year Seminar and other academic programs and its potential as a faculty development tool. 

Fulbright Scholar Workshop

Tuesday, November 10, 2-4 p.m., Robertson Room, Johnson Hall

Interested in teaching or conducting research abroad as a Fulbright Scholar? Join Dr. Andrew Riess, Senior Program Officer, for a workshop about how to apply for Fulbright teaching or research awards. Awards are available in all disciplines and throughout the world. Refreshments available. For more information on the Fulbright Scholar program, visit www.cies.org.

Assessment Workshop, "The Basic, No-Frills General Education Assessment System"

Monday, November 9, 2-5 p.m., Johnson Room, Robertson Hall

We're counting down to fall 2010 when the new Core Curriculum becomes fully implemented. To help with that process, the focus on this year's workshop is on assessing Core courses. Even if you haven't yet taught in the Core, this workshop will prove valuable as you consider ways to evaluate student learning in all of your classes. All faculty are invited and encouraged to participate in this Assessment Workshop. 

"Building Global Bridges? International News for Women"

Brown Bag Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentations

Monday, November 9, noon-1 p.m., University Club (AU111)

While the right to communicate is a basic human right, women continue to be excluded from the news media. In response, some women's groups have created alternative media that focus on women. This presentation by Margaretha Geertsema, Journalism, considers the efforts of the New York based online news service Women's eNews and in particular the creation of its Arabic news site. Women's eNews covers international women's issues on a regular basis through freelance correspondents from all over the world. Results of this study are based on an institutional analysis, in-depth interviews, and an analysis of international stories published by Women's eNews since 2000. 

Searching for Funding Opportunities on the SPIN Database

Thursday, November 5, 10-11 a.m., JH041

or Friday, November 6, 10-11 a.m., JH041

Do you need money to conduct research, develop a course or implement a program? This workshop will teach you how to search for funding using the electronic database SPIN. Participants will build their own searches and register to have SPIN notify them regarding relevant funding opportunities. 

New Faculty Orientation: Grant Opportunities

Wednesday, November 4, noon-1 p.m., University Club (AU111)

Come learn about the myriad of grant opportunities for your discipline, as well as the internal research, scholarship and creative work grants awarded by Butler.


First Wednesday Coffee Break

Wednesday, November 4, 2:30-4:30 p.m., JH109 Faculty Lounge

Join friends and colleagues for our next First Wednesday Coffee Break. When you hit that afternoon lull, come over to Jordan Hall 109 - we'll have coffee and tea and a variety of cookies. Come when you can, stay as long as you'd like. "Among the numerous luxuries of the table...coffee may be considered one of the most valuable. It excites cheerfulness without intoxication; and the pleasing flow of spirits which it occasions...is never followed by sadness, languor or debility." - Benjamin Franklin

Service Learning Workshop

Wednesday, October 28, noon-1:15 p.m., AU201

Are you interested in a hands-on workshop that explores developing service learning course components to invigorate and transform your teaching? Are you curious about how the service learning pedagogy may help  our students fulfill the Indianapolis Community Requirement? If you want to learn more about service learning and the ICR, sign up for one of two workshops this fall. Workshop participants will receive important comprehensive information regarding the benefits of integrating service learning into existing new courses. Details about course development funds and teaching and scholarly resource materials will also be shared.

The workshop, conducted by Trish Devine (COPHS) and Margaret Brabant (LAS), is designed to aid teaching faculty in the development of courses with service learning components that may also be used by students to fulfill the new Indianapolis Community Requirement (effective fall 2010). 

CANCELLED - Faculty Food for Thought: Teaching with Twitter?

Tuesday, October 27, 5-6 p.m., University Club (AU111)

Join colleagues for a conversation about how social media - online video, blogs, wikis, podcasts - may be changing the way we teach, and the way students learn. 

"Inequality, Experience of Discrimination, and Health"

Brown Bag Faculty Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work Presentations

Friday, October 23, noon to 1 p.m., University Club (AU111)

A chieving and maintaining good health, especially at the level of populations, is not as simple as making healthy "lifestyle" choices. We know that huge disparities in health exist between groups of people with the single largest determinant of health status being socioeconomic position. Priscilla Ryder, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice, will discuss some of her recent research involving the ways in which experience of racebased discrimination in healthcare varies with age, gender, race/ethnicity and education level.

Core Conversations

Thursday, October 22, 4 to 5 p.m. (JH083)

or Friday, October 23, noon to 1 p.m. (AU 326) or 2 to 3 p.m. (AU 326)

As Butler prepares to move fully into the new Core curriculum in fall 2010, it's time to think about how the new Core has worked so far, where it's successes have been, and where it's challenges still are. You are invited to attend one of the Core Conversations - gather with colleagues for conversation, learn about faculty development opportunities, and offer your ideas about how the Core can best be supported on campus. 

Introduction to the Grant Process Workshop

Thursday, October 22, 10 to 11 a.m.

or Friday, October 23, 10 to 11 a.m., both in JH048

Do you need money to conduct research, develop a course or implement a program? Dana Ohren (BIRS) is conducting a workshop series that will teach you what you need to know to find and apply for grants. The first sessions will provide an overview of the grant application process with special attention paid to Butler procedures. 

First Wednesday Coffee Break

Wednesday, October 7, 2:30-4:30 p.m., JH109 Faculty Lounge

Please join friends and colleagues from across campus for the inaugural First Wednesday Coffee Break. When you hit that afternoon lull, come over to Jordan Hall 109 - we'll have coffee and tea, and a variety of cookies. Come when you can, stay for as long as you'd like. "Coffee is real good when you drink it it gives you time to think. It's a lot more than just a drink; it's something happening. Not as in hip, but like an event, a place to be, but not like a location, but like somewhere within yourself. It gives you time, but not actual hours or minutes, but a chance to be, like be yourself, and have a second cup." - Gertrude Stein

New Faculty Orientation: Fitting the Curricular Pieces Together

Wednesday, October 7, noon-1 p.m., University Club (AU111)

Majors and minors, concentrations and the Core. Join us for lunch to see how the curriculum works at Butler, particularly during this advising time.

Evaluating Writing Simplified

Wednesday, September 30, noon-1:30 p.m., AU 326

and Thursday, October 1, 12:30-2 p.m., AU 302

The most common reason given for not assigning more writing is the amount of time it takes to grade formal written work. It is a demanding and labor-intensive job, but there are ways to streamline the process. Come to this workshop to share, discuss, and learn about strategies and techniques that will lessen the grading burden and cut back on the time it takes to get through that stack of assignments.

New Faculty Orientation: Working with Diverse Learners and Learning Styles

Wednesday, September 30, noon-1 p.m., University Club (AU111)

How can faculty best work with the variety of students who come into classes who may have different knowledge levels and skills? What are ways to best capitalize on and support the diverse experiences students bring to class? How might assignments be structured to allow students to do their best work, or how can class time be managed, particularly when differences of opinion or experience surface? With Stephan Laurent-Faesi (Dance), Dr. Allison Harthcock (Media Arts), and Dr. Chad Bauman (Religion).

Service Learning Workshop

Thursday, September 24, 8-9:15 a.m., AU201

Are you interested in a hands-on workshop that explores developing service-learning course components to invigorate and transform your teaching? Are you curious about how the servicelearning pedagogy may help your students fulfill the Indianapolis Community Requirement? If you want to learn more about service-learning and the ICR, sign-up for one of two workshops this fall. Workshop participants will receive important comprehensive information regarding the benefits of integrating service-learning into existing or new courses. Details about course development funds and teaching and scholarly resource materials will also be shared.

The workshops, conducted by Trish Devine (COPHS) and Margaret Brabant (LAS), are designed to aid teaching faculty in the development of courses with service-learning components that may also be used by students to fulfill the new Indianapolis Community Requirement (effective Fall 2010).

Writing Instruction De-Mystified

Monday, September 21, noon-1:30 p.m., JH 083

and Tuesday, September 22, 12:30-2 p.m., JH 172 

You may have heard through the inevitable campus kudzu vines of the many challenges associated with teaching writing. However, don't believe everything that you hear. Come to this workshop to discuss, confront, and surmount the challenges posed by teaching writing.

New Faculty Orientation: Guiding Class Discussions

Wednesday, September 16, noon-1 p.m., University Club (AU111)

New Faculty Academic-Year Orientation Session on guiding Class discussions, engaging students in classes, and employing active learning techniques for larger classes, with Dr. Arthur Hochman (Education) and Dr. Stacy O'Reilly (Chemistry).

Faculty Food for Thought: Incorporating Service Learning into Courses

Thursday, September 10, noon-1 p.m., University Club (AU111)

A focused Countdown to the Core conversation to introduce the concepts of service learning and provide examples of how Butler faculty have successfully enhanced their students' learning through community connections.

Faculty Food for Thought: Digital Storytelling

Thursday, September 3, noon-1 p.m., University Club (AU111)

Join colleagues to learn about digital storytelling, the practice of using computer-based tools-a mixture of images, computer-based images, text, or recorded audio narration--to tell stories. New Faculty Academic-Year Orientation Session, Wednesday, September 2

Faculty Food for Thought is an ongoing conversation series for faculty to talk with colleagues about pedagogy, research, scholarship, or creative work, community involvement, or issues in higher education. Conversations are led by faculty colleagues and lunch is provided.

New Faculty Academic-Year Orientation Session

Wednesday, September 2, noon-1 p.m., University Club (AU111)

All new faculty are invited to this first academic-year orientation session-this is a time to reconnect, look at the semester ahead, and ask and get answers to questions that may have arisen from the start of classes.