Faculty Development

Calendar of Events and Programs 2013-2014

This page is updated regularly. Please check back for upcoming events.

"Booth, Pressgang and the Publishing Lab" by Bryan Furuness and Rob Stapleton
Part of the Faculty Food for Thought Series
Thursday, April 24, 9-10 a.m., AU302
Pressgang is a small press affiliated with Butler's MFA Program in Creative Writing. Their mission is to publish narrative lit: novels, memoirs, collections of stories or essays. Booth is a national literary journal with dual publishing arms(print and online) that has received praise both near and far. Come and learn more about these exciting projects, and about Bryan and Rob's proposal to create a Publishing Lab within the English Department. Breakfast treats provided. Seating is limited. RSVP to facultyfellow@butler.edu required.

Celebration of Innovation in Teaching
Wednesday, April 16, 4-6 p.m., Irwin Library, Collaborative Learning Space
The Celebration of Innovation in Teaching will feature peer reviewed demonstrations, posters, exhibitions, and performances presented by Butler faculty. Butler faculty will share their teaching exemplars, instructional strategies, new class assignments or projects, new approaches to rubric-making, and innovations in measuring student engagement, student learning, and student dispositions. No RSVP required.

"Collections Redefined: New Strategies for Managing Knowledge Resources at Butler University Libraries"
Part of the Faculty Food for Thought Series
Wednesday, April 16, noon-1 p.m., AU111 (UClub)

Now that information is super-abundant-whether in "the cloud" or delivered by drones, how do academic libraries decide which resources in what formats to acquire, to borrow, or to keep?  Dean Julie Miller and a panel of library faculty share the guiding principles and new strategies in the revised collections policy at Butler University Libraries.

Lunch tickets to The Market Place will be provided. Seating is limited. RSVP to facultyfellow@butler.edu.

"Using the 'B' word: What does it really mean and how do we help?"
Butler Brown Bag Series for Faculty Research, Scholarship and Creative Work

Brandie Oliver, College of Education,  Thursday, April 10, noon-1 p.m., AU111 (UClub)
With the increased media attention on bullying, there has been an increase in over-labeling of what is considered bullying. It is critical that we understand what bullying is and what it is not. Educators are key players in the prevention and intervention of bullying. One person can make an impact, but it truly requires the whole school community for real change to occur. By focusing on empathy education and pro-social behaviors, we can provide a safe and supportive school community for ALL students. This discussion, led by Brandie Oliver, will focus on a clear definition of bullying, the subgroups of students that are at higher risk, empowering students, and strategies to strengthen our work as educators.

Click here to view the poster for this session.

"Creating a Buzz: Sharing Your Work via the Digital Commons"
Part of the Faculty Food for Thought Series
Thursday, March 20, noon-1 p.m., AU111 (UClub)
What do Provost Morris, Dr. Albert Price, and Butler alum Aubrey Villines have in common? They are authors in the top ten list of most downloaded articles in the Digital Commons at Butler University. Find out how you can add your work to the Digital Commons and create some buzz of your own.
Lunch tickets to The Market Place will be provided. Seating is limited. RSVP to facultyfellow@butler.edu.

Faculty Coffee Talk: "Classroom Discussions"
Tuesday, March 18, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., AU111 (UClub)

Join Susan Adams and Elizabeth Mix for a series of Coffee Talks about teaching! March 18 we'll "talk amongst ourselves" - the topic: Classroom Discussions! Do they make you verkempt or drive you crazy? Come talk about them, and have some coffee while you do it! No RSVP required.
Faculty Development Coffee Talks -- it's not Linda Richman, but they're still like butter!

Lunch tickets to The Market Place will be available beginning at 11:30. A tab at Starbucks will also be available - reference "faculty coffee talk" when ordering.

"Factors that Influence Online Learning Assessment and Satisfaction with Online Courses"
Butler Brown Bag Series for Faculty Research, Scholarship and Creative Work
Sakthi Mahenthiran and Hongjiang Xu, College of Business
Tuesday, March 4, noon-1 p.m., AU111 (UClub)

Many studies suggest factors that might influence online learning and assessment, but most of them have not been empirically tested. Join us for a conversation with Drs. Mahenthiran and Xu, as they share the results from their study, which investigated factors that influence student satisfaction with online assessment, and overall student satisfaction with online learning.

Click here to view the poster for this session.

Faculty Coffee Talk: "Grading"
Wednesday, February 26, 10-11:30 a.m., AU111 (UClub)

Join Susan Adams and Elizabeth Mix for a series of Coffee Talks about teaching! February 26 we'll "talk amongst ourselves" - the topic:  Grading! Does it make you verkempt or drive you crazy? Come talk about it, and have some coffee while you do it! No RSVP required. A tab at Starbucks will be available, beginning a half hour before each session - reference "faculty coffee talk" when ordering.

 "SLO Progress: Tales of Success in Student Information Literacy"
Part of the Faculty Food for Thought Series
Tuesday, February 25, noon-1 p.m., AU111 (UClub)
A panelof academic and library faculty will share their collaborative experiences in helping students to achieve their own Eureka! moments using library resources.
Lunch tickets to The Market Place will be provided. RSVP to facultyfellow@butler.edu.

How will you share your IQ story?
Tuesday, February 18, noon-1:00 p.m., AU302

Who says there is no such thing as a free lunch? Lunch is on us, Tuesday, February 18 from noon-1PM in AU302. At this Inquiry Question session, you will prepare to share a new teaching idea, new approach, new assignment, new project, or a new resource which has made some sort of change in your teaching practice, be it incremental or revolutionary. While you munch on your lunch, you will get suggestions, brainstorming, and support for writing a proposal to share your Inquiry Question story at the April Celebration of Innovation in Teaching. Free lunch AND the opportunity to prepare for a peer-reviewed scholarly presentation on your teaching? That's a win-win!

Please send your RSVP to facultyfellow@butler.edu.

"The Void and the Drumbeat:  Addressing the Paradigm Shift in Education Facilitation through Chemical Analysis of Common Samples"
Butler Brown Bag Series for Faculty Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity Presentation

Olujide Akinbo, Chemistry, Wednesday, February 12
The drumbeat for a paradigm shift in the way education is facilitated has been loud for decades. The call fueled by new knowledge in the way people learn comes from every facet of the society: the government, graduate and professional schools, industry, parents, echoes of experts from the past and more recently the economy. Higher institutions are responding to this call in a variety of ways through programs and diverse pedagogical developments.  However, the pedagogical developments are occurring in silos called colleges, departments, disciplines and sub-disciplines. There is hardly any sharing of information and ideas across the silo boundaries. This presentation will describe how we are using the analysis of common samples (bottled water, wine, potato chips) to facilitate the shift from a traditional to a learner-centered pedagogy in a subspecialty of chemistry.  In particular data generated by students will be used to address the questions: What's in your bottled water? Is it any better than the tap water? Is it worth spending the extra dollar on bottled water?

Click here to view the poster for this session.

Faculty Coffee Talk!
Thursday, January 30, 9:30-11:00 a.m., AU111 (UClub)

Join Susan Adams and Elizabeth Mix for a series of Coffee Talks about teaching! January 30 we'll "talk amongst ourselves" - the topic: rubrics! Do they make you verkempt or drive you crazy? Come talk about them, and have some coffee while you do it! No RSVP required.

Faculty Development Coffee Talks -- it's not Linda Richman, but they're still like butter!

A tab at Starbucks will be available, beginning a half hour before each session - reference "faculty coffee talk" when ordering.

"The New Mechanical Philosophy"
Butler Brown Bag Series for Faculty Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity Presentation

Stuart Glennan, Philosophy and Religion
Tuesday, January 28, noon-1 p.m., AU111 (UClub)

Natural and social scientists often characterize their work as a search for the mechanisms responsible for the phenomena they study. While this way of thinking about the nature of science has its origins in 17th century philosophy, contemporary philosophers of science have only recently begun to think about mechanisms. The result has been an explosion of work on the nature of mechanisms, and their relation to causation, explanation, modeling, and discovery that has come to be known as the New Mechanical Philosophy.

Please join us for a discussion with Stuart Glennan on his sabbatical research for his book on this emerging area in the philosophy of science.

Click here to view the poster for this session.

Inquiry Question Coaching Sessions
Thursday, January 9, 9-10 a.m., 10-11 a.m., 11-noon, AU201

Remember the Fall Faculty Workshop waaaaay back in August, when you created your Inquiry Question?

Inquiring minds want to know: How are you doing with your inquiry question? What are you learning? How is your question changing your teaching? If you created a question and a plan, but got stuck, what would it take to get you unstuck?

Tell us all about it! Whether the thought of your Inquiry Question makes you feel vaguely guilty, elated, or mildly superior, join us for an encouraging, guilt-free, 1-hour small group coaching session designed to move you toward practices that create the outcomes you are hoping for.

What's in it for you? A coved faculty development participation certificate, light refreshments, fabulous mystery door prizes, and a positive, productive time designed to help you start 2014 with a bang! Please RSVP to facultyfellow@butler.edu indicating your time preference.

Food for Thought: Meet Butler's New General Counsel: Claire Aigotti
Tuesday, December 10, 2013, noon-1PM, AU302

Spend time getting to know one of our newest colleagues, Claire Aigotti as Butler's General Counsel. Over lunch, she will introduce herself, explain her role, and provide a big picture overview of her work. Lunch provided. This event has limited seating available! First come, first served.

Limited seats available - RSVP required. Email facultyfellow@butler.edu to reserve your space.

"Posession Films and the Horrors of Womanhood"
Butler Brown Bag Series for Faculty Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity Presentation
Casey Kelly, Media, Rhetoric and Culture
Wednesday, December 4, noon-1 p.m., AU111 (UClub)
Why do films about demon possession seem to resonate with American filmgoers? In this presentation, Casey Kelly (CCOM) examines contemporary horror films about demonic possession in the context of present cultural anxieties about young women's sexuality. In a public culture saturated with messages of sexual purity and abstinence-until-marriage, possession films transcode contemporary discourses about the dangers of young women's sexual agency into a cinematic form that resonates with the gender anxieties of popular audiences. With an emphasis on the threats to young women's innocence and physical integrity, the dangers of lost fatherhood, and the protections of religious faith and the nuclear family, possession films project collective fears that burgeoning womanhood might precipitate a crisis in masculinity and the family. Through a comparative analysis of the rhetoric of sexual purity advocates and the narrative structure of possessions films, Casey illustrates what is currently articulated as monstrous about young women in American culture. This lecture will examine the 2012 film The Possession to show how images of vulnerable, violated, and monstrous young women legitimize male control over female bodies.

Click here to view the poster for this session.

Global Initiatives Grants Information Session
Thursday, November 21, 12:15-1:15, AU111 (UClub)
If you are interested in deepening your knowledge and experience in a different world region, enhancing your foreign language proficiency, internationalizing one of your courses, or developing a short-term study program abroad, please plan to attend this information session about Butler's Global Initiatives Grants program, which is sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the Center for Global Education. CGE Director Monte Broaded will explain the basics of this internal grant program and prior recipients will describe their projects. Lunch tickets to The Market Place will be provided. So that we can best be prepared, please RSVP to Rebecca DeGrazia (rdegrazi@butler.edu).

"Rebel Bulldog: The Davidson Family of Indianapolis and the Civil War that Divided Them"
Butler Brown Bag Series for Research, Scholarship and Creative Work Presentation

Jason Lantzer, Honors Program
Tuesday, November 12, noon-1 p.m., AU111 (UClub)

During the 1857-1858 school year, North Western Christian University welcomed as part of its student body two brothers, Dorman and Preston Davidson.  The Davidson boys were from a prominent and influential Indianapolis family and were active in the life of the young college founded by Ovid Butler just a few years before.  Like many of their peers, Dorman and Preston were destined to live through and serve in the Civil War.  However, while Dorman eventually wore Union blue, his brother Preston is the only Butler University alum to wear Confederate grey.  Come and learn more about this interesting family, what they can tell us about the Civil War, the early years of Butler University, and their connection to Uncle Tom's Cabin. 

Click here to view the poster for this session.

Area 1 Lunch
Monday, November 11, noon-1:15 p.m., AU111 (UClub)
All those teaching in Area 1 (Texts and Ideas, Social World, Perspectives in the Creative Arts) past, present or future - or serving on the Area 1 committee - are invited to attend. No RSVP required.

"Reflect, Retool, Refresh: How am I Doing with My Inquiry Question?"
Saturday, November 9, 9-11 a.m., JH183
Remember August 21? It seems like it was only yesterday that we were all at the Fall Faculty Workshop developing an inquiry question to guide our teaching practice through the year. Join us to share and hear how others are progressing on their personal goals, including the bumps along the road. We will provide coffee and snacks and most importantly a supportive environment for this important pedagogical work. No RSVP required.

"Tricks or Treats? Strategies for Integrating Authentic Assessment of Student Learning into the Classroom"
Thursday, October 31, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., AU326
Whether we are talking in-class tests, projects, performances, or SLO's, assessment is a hot topic. In this session, we will identify and explore both the pitfalls and the opportunities inherent in assessment of student learning. It's no trick: take home sweet assessment ideas from fellow colleagues who will share their perspectives and approaches. And in honor of Halloween, candy treats will be provided, but costumes are optional! No RSVP required.

"Cyber-Moms: The Mediating and Moderating Effects of the Internet on the Relationship between New Momism and Self-Efficacy"
Butler Brown Bag Series for Reearch, Scholarship and Creative Work Presentation
Krista Cline, Sociology and Criminology
Wednesday, October 30
, noon-1 p.m., AU111(UClub)
Previous research has revealed that new momism, which is a way of describing how women in current times must live up to certain expectations of parenting and the pressure to be perfect, is strongly enforced by self-guilt, but also by the media. This study seeks to examine the internet as a form of media enforcement of new momism, and how it relates to parenting self-efficacy.  Using data collected from an online survey, we examined the main, mediating and moderating effects of the internet on the relationship between new momism and self-efficacy. Regression analyses revealed that  the internet appears to play a mediating role, meaning that internet consumption strengthens the relationship.  New momism is associated with lower self-efficacy for  women who use the internet more frequently. This finding leads us to believe that mothers are indeed comparing themselves to other mothers that they encounter in cyberspace.  Limitations and future directions are also discussed. 

Click here to view the poster for this session.

Texts and Ideas: Assessment Luncheon
Wednesday, October 23, noon-1:15 p.m., AU201
All those teaching in Texts and Ideas - past, present or future - are invited to attend. No RSVP required.

Global and Historical Studies (GHS) - Team-taught Course Development Lunch Opportunity
Tuesday, October 15, 12:15-1 p.m., AU326
The GHS program is inviting proposals for the development of new GHS courses to be taught by small groups of 2-3 faculty members in fall 2014 and spring 2015. Interested faculty members are invited to a lunch to learn more abou the application process and to share ideas. Please RSVP to Laura Daily (lmcobb@butler.edu).

"Contesting Faith, Truth, and Religious Language at the Creation Museum: A Historical-Theological Reflection"
Butler Brown Bag Series for Reearch, Scholarship and Creative Work Presentation
Brent Hege, Philosophy and Religion
Wednesday, October 9, noon-1 p.m., AU111 (UClub)

The Creation Museum, a ministry of the apologetics organization Answers in Genesis, purports to demonstrate the factuality of the biblical creation narratives and to raise suspicions concerning the overwhelming scientific consensus on evolution. Informing the museum's apologetic efforts are highly contested definitions of faith, truth, and religious language, definitions paradoxically rooted in modern science and the Enlightenment. The focus of this presentation by Brent Hege is on the competing definitions of faith, truth and religious language in Creationism and mainline Protestantism and the effects these definitions have on how Christians understand the relationship between faith and science.

Click  here  to view the poster for this session.

Teaching Dilemmas Workshop
Saturday, October 5, 9 a.m.-noon, JH183
A teaching dilemma is an issue in which you are struggling, that weighs on your mind, that seems to keep cropping up, and which could be interrupted or improved by some change in yourself or in your practice. We all have professional or pedagogical dilemmas that make us feel frustrated, stuck, or even guilty because we never seem to find the right time or circumstances we need to deal with them. In this session, you will get to first experience and participate a fishbowl dilemma protocol facilitated by Butler colleagues who are trained Critical Friends Group facilitators: Katie Brooks, Shelley Furuness, Ryan Flessner, Brooke Kandel Cisco, Elizabeth Mix and Susan Adams. Then you will have a chance to share one of your teaching dilemmas in a small, facilitated and supportive group of colleagues who are also eager to grow and transform with you. You will leave with fresh, relevant ideas for your practice and a new appreciation for collegial community. No RSVP required. Light breakfast refreshments will be served.

"DNA @ 60: What is in Store for You is Mind-Blowing"
Butler Brown Bag Series for Reearch, Scholarship and Creative Work Presentation

Alex Erkine, Pharmaceutical Sciences
Tuesday, September 24, noon-1 p.m., AU111 (UClub)

After 60 years of the discovery of the DNA structure, it is now possible to read the entire content of your own DNA for just $5000 in a few weeks. In a year or two, the price is predicted to drop to $1000 and will be routinely done - similar to a blood test, with data stored on a computer. Since this information holds the keys to potential life-threatening medical conditions, as well as to your personal traits (psychological character, mental abilities, ethnic origins, etc.), the question is: do you want to gain this information about yourself, your relatives, or your future spouse? Do you think the insurance companies, your roommate, or the NSA will want it? And if they do get it, what do you think they will do with it? Join us for a lunchtime conversation on this topic with Alex Erkine, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Click here to view the poster for this session.

Area 1 Assessment Coffee Hours at Starbucks
Social World: Monday, September 16, 3:30-4:30 p.m.
Social World: Thursday, September 26, 9:30-10:30 a.m.
Texts and Ideas: Thursday, October 3, 9:30-10:30 a.m.
All those teaching in the Social World and Texts and Ideas - past, present, and future - are invited to Starbucks for coffee (a tab will ba available) and conversation on assessment in these areas.

Pedagogy Share Fair
Thursday, September 19, 2:30-4:30 p.m., PB204
Do you want fresh ideas for engaging your students? Would you like to share what works for you? Come to the Pedagogy Share Fair, where colleagues will share ideas you can adapt for use in your classes. You are also invited to share YOUR ideas. If you'd like to share, come prepared to talk briefly about an approach that clicked with your students: one strategy, protocol, small group engagement, or in-class activity you found to be successful. Whether or not you share, you'll leave with many new strategies to test drive with your students. No RSVP required. Light refreshments will be available.

"Who Are Our Students?" 
Friday, September 13, 1-3 p.m., JH083
The question, "What is effective teaching?" depends on a second, crucial question: "Who are our students?" Nandini Ramaswamy will help us sip from the fire hose of student responses to surveys and demographic data. Join colleagues to examine what the data reveals about our students, identify areas of dissonance, and search together for pedagogical implications. No RSVP required. Light refreshments will be available.

Click here to view materials from this presentation.

"Doctor Who and Religion: A 50th  Anniversary Celebration"
Butler Brown Bag Series for Reearch, Scholarship and Creative Work Presentation
James McGrath, Philosophy and Religion
Wednesday, September 11, noon-1 p.m., AU111 (UClub)

Doctor Who is the longest running science fiction television show in history, and this year marks its 50th  anniversary. Such a long-running show provides a unique opportunity to trace trends in the intersection of religion and popular culture. But Doctor Who (like much other science fiction) also explores a number of scenarios that are interesting from the perspective of religious studies. For instance, if one traveled through time, could one change the ancient practice of human sacrifice, or the outcome of the Council of Nicaea? Or if the gods and demons of ancient peoples were real alien beings, would that undermine human religion, or demonstrate it to be literally true?

Join Dr. James F. McGrath, editor of Religion and Science Fiction (Pickwick Publications, 2011) and co-editor of the forthcoming volume Time and Relative Dimensions in Faith:  (Darton, Longman, and Todd, 2013) for a lunchtime exploration of some highlights from 50 years of religious themes and explorations in this famous TV show.

Click  here  to view the poster for this session.

 

View an archive of past years' events.