Core Curriculum

News & Events

Spring 2014

Be sure to check back for a more complete list of GHS events for the semester:

January 23, 7:00pm: GHS Film Screening "Tsotsi"-  On the edges of Johannesburg, Tsotsi's life has no meaning
beyond survival. One night, in desperation, Tsotsi steals a woman's car. But as he is driving off, he makes a shocking discovery in the backseat. In one moment his life takes a sharp turn and leads him down an unexpected path to redemption...giving him hope for a future he never could have imagined. Tsotsi is an extraordinary portrait of how compassion can endure in the human heart.  (Pharmacy Building 103)

March 5, 7:30pm: GHS Film Screening "Goodbye Lenin"- This German comedy takes place in 1990, when a young man protects his fragile mother from a fatal shock after a long coma as he attempts to keep her from learning that her beloved nation of East Germany as she knew it has disappeared. (Jordan Hall 141)

March 20, 7:00pm: GHS Film Screening "Lumumba"- Made in the tradition of such true-life political thrillers
as MALCOLM X and JFK, Raoul Peck's award-winning LUMUMBA is a gripping epic that dramatizes for the first time the rise and fall of legendary African leader Patrice Lumumba. When the Congo declared its independence from Belgium in 1960, the 36-year-old, self-educated Lumumba became the first Prime Minister of the newly independent state. Called "the politico of the bush" by journalists of the day, he became a lightning rod of Cold War politics as his vision of a united Africa gained him powerful enemies in Belgium and the U.S. Lumumba would last just months in office before being brutally assassinated. Strikingly photographed in Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Belgium as civil war once again raged in the Congo, the film vividly re-creates the shocking events behind the birth of the country that became Zaire during the reign of Lumumba's former friend and eventual nemesis, Joseph Mobutu. (Pharmacy Building 103)

March 27, 6:30pm: "How Europe and America are Evolving Towards Africa"-Phi Beta Kappa Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture: John Comaroff, Ph.D. "The Global South" has become a shorthand for the world of non-European, postcolonial peoples. Synonymous with uncertain development, unorthodox economies, failed states, and nations fraught with corruption, poverty, incivility, and strife, it is that half of the world about which the "Global North" spins theories.  Rarely is it seen as a source of explanation for world historical events. Yet, as many nation-states of the northern hemisphere experience increasing fiscal meltdown, state privatization, corruption, creeping poverty, ethnic conflict, xenophobia, problems of law and order, and other perceived crises, it seems as though they are evolving southward, so to speak, in both positive and problematic ways. Is this so? How? In what measure? This lecture takes on these questions. In particular, it asks how we might understand the world anew with theory developed in the south, giving an ironic twist to the evolutionary pathways long assumed by social scientists. (Eidson-Duckwall Recital Hall)

April 1, 3:50pm: Conference on Ethics and Public Argumentation (CEPA), "Africa Is a Country and Shifting Digital Landscapes in Media of Africa"-A lecture by Sean Jacobs, Media Scholar at the New School, Scholar of media and international affairs at the New York School (NYC) and former journalist in South Africa. (Robertson Hall, Johnson Room)

April 10, 7:00pm: "Malaria prevention and control in Africa: is elimination possible?" - A lecture by Tulane University epidemiologist, Dr. Joseph Keating.  Dr. Keating's research on vector-borne illnesses has taken him to tropical countries all over the globe, including Haiti, Zambia, Eritrea and Nigeria. (Pharmacy Building 150)

Past Events

Fall 2013

September 18, 7:00pm:One Day After Peace - Featuring Archbishop Desmond Tutu-Film and Dialogue on Forgiveness and Reconciliation. Is it possible to forgive the person who has murdered your daughter or son?  Follow Robi Damelin on her journey in search of some very personal answers to this question as she visits with mothers whose children have died in the violence of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and amidst apartheid South Africa.  Stay afterwards to share your thoughts and feelings about this powerful film with Butler Professors Margaretha Geertsema-Sligh (Journalism) and Sholeh Shahrokhi (Anthropology). Co-sponsored by PACS and the Global and Historical Studies Program (GHS). (Pharmacy Building 204)

October 2, 7:00pm: "Women in Modern Afghanistan"- A lecture by Mohammad Slaimon Ayoubu. (Robertson Hall, Johnson Room)

October 9, 7:00pm: GHS Film Screening "To Live". Originally banned in China, this moving film is set against four decades of Chinese political turmoil, and follows the lives of a couple as they struggle to survive their own changing station within the upheaval. (Robertson Hall, Johnson Room)

October 22, 7:30pm:"Human Rights in Tibet & Tibetan-Chinese Relationship"-A lecture by Bhuchung K. Tsering, Interim President for the International Campaign for Tibet and former columnist for the Tibetan monthly, Tibetan Review. Bhuchung K. Tsering will address issues relating to political and religious freedom, the effects of non-Tibetans into Tibetan areas, environmental rights and human rights. He will also explain the Middle Way Approach as a peaceful solution to current problems.  This event is co-sponsored by Global and Historical Studies, the Department of Political Science, International Studies, & Peace and Conflict Studies. (Robertson Hall, Johnson Room)

October 24, 7:00pm-Film Screening: Hannah Arendt.  In the award-winning HANNAH ARENDT, the sublime Barbara Sukowa reteams with director Margarethe von Trotta (Vision, Rosa Luxemburg) for a brilliant new biopic of the influential German-Jewish philosopher and political theorist. Arendt's reporting on the 1961 trial of ex-Nazi Adolf Eichmann in The New Yorker-controversial both for her portrayal of Eichmann and the Jewish councils-introduced her now-famous concept of the "Banality of Evil." Using footage from the actual Eichmann trial and weaving a narrative that spans three countries, von Trotta beautifully turns the often invisible passion for thought into immersive, dramatic cinema. An Official Selection at the Toronto International and New York Jewish Film Festivals. (Gallahue Hall 106)

October 29, 7:00pm: Who Made the Clothes You are Wearing - and Why Does it Matter? Doing a Feminist Investigation"-A lecture by Cynthia Enloe, Ph.D., research Professor in the International Development, Community, and Environment Department at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts. Starting with terrible garment factory fires and building collapse last year in Bangladesh, we will investigate why the majority of workers who died in those tragedies were young women and how these women and we (men and women) who buy brand name clothes are tied together by globalized economics, politics and ideas - each of them gendered. (Robertson Hall, Johnson Room)

November 12, 7:30pm: Musical performance by "Baoku & The Image Afro-Beat Band."  Baoku Moses is a professional cultural African performing artist and an Afro-beat musician, singer, song writer, band leader and a composer from Nigeria.  Afro-beat, a musical combination of big band jazz fusion with African instruments and languages, is a musical expression of peace, love, unity, truth and justice. The Image Afro-beat Band is comprised of musicians from different musical and cultural backgrounds. The band uses Afro-beat music to create and promote appreciation for cultural diversity, respect for life, unity and love, in contribution to making the world a peaceful place to live. (Atherton Union, Reilly Room)

December 2, 7:00pm: GHS will show the film "Tableau Ferraille."  This film offers an intimate view of how modernization, at least as practiced in today's Africa, corrodes traditional communities and retards grassroots development. Like such past Senegalese masterpieces as Ousmane Sembene's Xala and Djibril Diop Mambety's Hyenas, it deplores a corrupt post-colonial elite's exploitation of the promise of African independence. (Gallahue Hall 108) 

December 4, 7:00pm. GHS will show the film "Paradise Now." This film follows two Palestinian childhood friends who have been recruited for a strike on Tel Aviv and focuses on their last days together. When they are intercepted at the Israeli border and separated from their handlers, a young woman who discovers their plan causes them to reconsider their actions. (Pharmacy Bulding 150)

Spring 2013

February 12, 7:00pm: "Globalization and the African Renaissance" - A lecture by Dr. Allan Boesak, Fellow at the Center for Faith and Vocation and Civil Rights Leader from South Africa. (Pharmacy and Health Sciences Building 150)

February 28, 5:00pm: "Gender, Inclusion, and AIDS in India: Reflections on the Massive Biometric Registration of 1.2 billion Indians" - A lecture by Lawrence Cohen, UC Berkeley. (Pharmacy and Health Sciences Building 156)

March 7, 7:00pm: GHS Film Screening "Goodbye, Lenin" - This German comedy takes place in 1990, when a young man protects his fragile mother from a fatal shock after a long coma as he attempts to keep her from learning that her beloved nation of East Germany as she knew it has disappeared. (Pharmacy and Health Sciences Building 156)

March 27, 7:00pm. GHS Film Screening "Half the Sky: Turning Oppression Into Opportunity For Women Worldwide." Inspired by Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn's groundbreaking book, "Half the Sky: Turning Oppression Into Opportunity For Women Worldwide" takes on the central moral challenge of the 21st century: the oppression of women and girls worldwide.

Take an unforgettable journey with six actress/advocates and New York Times journalist Kristof to meet some of the most courageous individuals of our time, who are doing extraordinary work to empower women and girls everywhere. These are stories of heartbreaking challenge, dramatic transformation and enduring hope. You will be shocked, outraged, brought to tears. Most important, you will be inspired by the resilience of the human spirit and the capabilities of women and girls to realize their staggering potential. "Half the Sky" is a passionate call-to-arms, urging us not only to bear witness to the plight of the world's women, but to help to transform their oppression into opportunity. Our future is in the hands of women, everywhere. (Jordan Hall 141)

April 10, 7:00pm: GHS Film Screening "Cave of Forgotten Dreams" - A breathtaking new documentary from the incomparable Werner Herzog (Encounters at the End of the World, Grizzly Man), follows an exclusive expedition into the nearly inaccessible Chauvet Cave in France, home to the most ancient visual art known to have been created by man. One of the most successful documentaries of all time,"Cave of Forgotten Dreams" is an unforgettable cinematic experience that provides a unique glimpse of pristine artwork dating back to human hands over 30,000 years ago -- almost twice as old as any previous discovery.

April 18, 7:00pm: "Ai WeiWei: According to What?" As one of China's most provocative and vocal artists, Ai Weiwei's focus on human rights and social change eventually led to his nearly three-month detainment by Chinese authorities. Since his arrest, Ai Weiwei has been kept under constant surveillance by the government. These circumstances have influenced his work enormously. IMA Curator of Contemporary Art, Sarah Green discusses the Indianapolis Museum of Art exhibition (April 5-July 28, 2013), which includes examples from the broad spectrum of the artist's practice -- from sculpture, photography, and video to site-specific architectural installations. (Jordan Hall 141)

Fall 2012

September 26, 6:00pm: "Studying war and violence up close: Scenes of atrocity from Bosnia, Rwanda, and the US" - A lecture by Dr. Lee Ann Fujii, assistant professor of political science at the University of Toronto. Dr. Fujii's research focuses on explaining violence. Her first book, Killing neighbors : webs of violence in Rwanda (Cornell University Press, 2009), explains how social relationships and networks shaped Hutus' differing decisions regarding whether to participate in, abstain from, or resist genocidal violence. Dr. Fujii's current project, "Deadly Ties," undertakes a micro-level comparison of neighborhood level violence in post-genocide Rwanda, post-genocide Bosnia, and Maryland's eastern shore. (Pharmacy and Health Sciences Building 150)

October 3, 7:00pm: GHS Film Screening PBS documentary "Secrets of the Dead: China's Terracotta Warriors". The extraordinary story of China s 8,000 terracotta warriors begins two centuries before the birth of Christ. The First Emperor of China was preparing an extravagant tomb for his journey into the afterlife and decreed that he be protected forever by a monumental army. Since then no one has seen these ancient warriors in their original splendor, brightly painted and fully armed, ready to protect their Emperor for all eternity. Now this once mighty army will be returned to its former glory for the first time. Row upon row of life-size, lavishly painted warriors will rise from the dust of two millennia. But how was a terracotta army of this size made in less than two years using the technology of 2200 years ago? Led by archaeologist Agnes Hsu, SECRETS OF THE DEAD shows that the Chinese may have Henry Ford beat by more than 2,000 years with their own assembly line used to produce the 8,000-strong Ghost Army. (Pharmacy and Health Sciences Building 156)

October 8, 7:00pm: GHS Film Screening "To Live". Originally banned in China, this moving film is set against four decades of Chinese political turmoil, and follows the lives of a couple as they struggle to survive their own changing station within the upheaval. (Robertson Hall, Johnson Room)

October 16, 12:00pm:GHS Pizza Chat: "Challenges of Nation Building in South Africa" - A lecture by Dr. Allan Boesak, Fellow at the Center for Faith and Vocation and Civil Rights Leader from South Africa. "South Africa's peaceful transition set an ambitious agenda for the country: building a constitutional democracy with guaranteed freedoms and rights. At the heart of it was national reconciliation and the task of nation-building after a fractured and divisive past. What are the challenges South Africa faces as it sets about this task?" Please send RSVP to lmcobb@butler.edu. (Clowes Memorial Hall, Krannert Room)

October 17, 6:00pm: The State of Indiana v. Bei Bei Shuai: Pregnant Women Need Support, Not Prison. Co-sponsered with Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies and Demia. (Pharmacy and Health Sciences Building 103)

November 7, 7:00pm: Elna Boesak, South African journalist and documentary film producer. Manufacturing Facts: The tragedies, challenges and ethics embedded in the reproduction of reality. 40-minute film screening of "Twelve Days in the Trenches" about women in South Africa followed by a discussion. Co-sponsered with the College of Communication. (Gallahue Hall 106)

November 13, 7:00pm:"Piercing the Veil: Scheherazade Don't Need No Visa" - A lecture by Dr. Laila Farah, DePaul University. Professor Farah's research, teaching and performances critique Orientalist and colonial imagery of Muslim women and the general demonization and creation of the" other" of Muslim women. Her Performance/Lecture is specifically gendered in tearing down stereotypes of Arab and Muslim women and the veil, while chronicling two separate autobiographical accounts of her journeys to and from the Middle East. The transnational and Arab feminist lenses she employs humanizes the inhumane nature of multiple forms of violence in order to work toward global social justice. The lecture and the narratives are linked through poetry by Haas Mroue, Suheir Hammad, as well as Laila Hallaby, news analysis and positive imagery of non-violent resistance. (Robertson Hall, Johnson Room)

November 28, 7:00pm: GHS Film Screening of "Water". Extremist groups waged a campaign of death threats, arson and riots to stop the production of this controversial film, but director Deepa Mehta would not be silenced. Set against Gandhi's rise to power, Water tells the profoundly moving story of Chuyia, an Indian girl married and widowed at eight years old, who is sent away to a home where Hindu widows must live in penitence. Chuyia's feisty presence deeply affects the other residents, forcing each to confront their faith and society's prejudices.. (Robertson Hall, Johnson Room)

November 29, 7:00pm: All American Muslim: Suehaila Amen will speak about her experiences being of the Islamic faith, effects from 9/11, and tolerance for religion. Co-sponsered with Podium Expressions, SGA Program Board and REACH. (Atherton Union, Reilly Room)

Spring 2012

February 22, 12:00pm. GHS Pizza Chat: "The Curious Case of Belgium and the Congo" a lecture by Matthew G. Stanard, Ph.D. Author of "Selling the Congo: A History of European Pro-Empire Propaganda and the Making of Belgian Imperialism." Please send RSVP to: lmcobb@butler.edu (Gallahue Hall 108)

March 7, 7:30pm. GHS Film "Goodbye, Lenin"- This German comedy takes place in 1990, when a young man protects his fragile mother from a fatal shock after a long coma as he attempts to keep her from learning that her beloved nation of East Germany as she knew it has disappeared. (Jordan Hall 141)

March 27, 3:00pm. "La Palabra en el Bosque" a film screening and discussion with director Jeffery Gould. (Robertson Hall, Johnson Room)

April 4, 7:00pm. "People of the Book", A student-led panel discussion on Jewish, Christian and Islamic faith practices. (Robertson Hall, Ford Salon)

April 10, 6:30pm. "The Invisibility of One's Own Death: Encounters with the Living Dead in Heart of Darkness"- A lecture by Amit Baishya, Ph.D., Professor of postcolonial literature and theory, world literature and cultural studies at Ball State University. (Gallahue Hall 108)

April 13, 12:00pm. "Malaria in Sub-Saharan Africa: prospects for elimination" - A lunchtime pizza chat with Tulane University epidemiologist, Dr. Joseph Keating. (Gallahue Hall 108)

April 17, 7:00pm. "Primum non nocere: HIV and AIDS in Africa and the Caribbean"- A lecture by Michael Vance, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology and Global and Historical Studies. (Pharmacy and Health Sciences Building 156)

Fall 2011

September 19, 12:00pm. Music, Spirituality, and Your Brain- A presentation by Yuval Ron, composer and producer of music for films, television, dance, and theater. He has performed for the Dalai Lama, the King of Morocco, and the Sufi leader Pir Inayat Khan. He has been featured on CNN, National Geographic, and in the international press. (Clowes Memorial Hall, Krannert Room)

September 20, 7:00pm."Road to Kashgar"-A musical performance by the Orchid Ensemble. (Atherton Union, Reilly Room)

September 27, 7:00pm."China in World History"- A lecture by Jerry Bentley, professor of history at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and founding editor of the Journal of World History. (Pharmacy and Health Sciences Building 150)

October 2, 2:00pm. Wind Ensemble Concert: "Ask the Earth and the Sky" Preconcert Talk. Wei Su, professor of East Asian language and literature at Yale and librettist of "Ask the Earth and the Sky" will give a preconcert talk for the Wind Ensemble Concert: "Ask the Earth and the Sky". (Clowes Memorial Hall)

October 5, 7:00pm. Film: "To Live"-Originally banned in China, this moving film is set against four decades of Chinese political turmoil, and follows the lives of a couple as they struggle to survive their own changing station within the upheaval. (Jordan Hall 141)

October 19, 12:00pm. "The Migrant Journey"- A pizza chat with Mexican migrant rights advocate Jaqueline García Salamanca. Jaqueline García Salamanca, former immigrant to the United States and Mexican migration expert, will be speaking about why people migrate, the risks they face, what they leave behind, and how we can be advocates for change. (Clowes Memorial Hall, Krannert Room). Please RSVP to lmcobb@butler.edu by October 14th.

October 20, 4:00pm."Poetry of Rumi"-Poet Adrian Vyner-Brooks will recite poetry of the ancient mystic Rumi. (Jordan Hall 141)

November 1, 7:00pm. "Sharia Law and Muslim Women"- A lecture by Rafia Zakaria, the first Pakistani American woman to serve as a Director for Amnesty International USA and the director of the Muslim Women's Legal Defense Fund for the Muslim Alliance of Indiana/The Julian Center Shelter.

November 14, 7:00pm. "Bling and the Aesthetics and Politics of Visibility in the Postcolonial Caribbean."- A lecture by Krista Thompson, professor of Art History at Northwestern University. (Pharmacy and Health Sciences Building 150)

Spring 2011

February 9, 7:00pm. "Life Under the Old Regime"- A lecture by Paul Hanson, Professor of History and specialist on the French Revolution. (Jordan Hall 141)

March 4, 3:00pm.  "Helen of Troy: Goddess, Princess, Whore, and How to Write the Biography of a Hole." A lecture by award-winning historian and author, Bettany Hughes. Lecture will be followed by a reception and book signing. (Johnson Room, Robertson Hall)

Bettany Hughes is an award-winning historian, author and broadcaster who has devoted much of the last twenty years to the vibrant communication of the past. Her first book Helen of Troy: Goddess, Princess, Whore, was published to great critical acclaim and has now been translated into ten languages. Bettany has made a number of factual films for the BBC, Channel 4, PBS, Discovery, The History Channel and ABC for both the British and International markets including "The Spartans", "When The Moors Ruled in
Europe", "Athens: The Truth of Democracy", "The Women of the Bible" and "Helen of Troy". These have now been seen by over 100 million people worldwide. She is president of JACT and advisor to the Foundation for Science Technology and Civilization. She has recently been awarded a special award for services to the Hellenic Culture and Heritage and the Naomi Sargent award for Broadcast Excellence. In 2011 she is the Chair of the Orange Prize for Fiction. Her latest book The Hemlock Cup: Socrates, Athens and the Search for The Good Life has already been selected as a Book of the Year by the national press in the UK and was read on BBC Radio Four as the Book of the Week in the run up to Christmas. Bettany was a Scholar at Oxford University and holds a Research Fellowship at King's College, London.
She lives in the UK and abroad with her husband and two daughters.

March 8th, 12:00-12:50pm- "The European Union: Will It Replace the US as a Superpower?" A lunchtime "pizza chat" with Professor Emeritus of Political Science, Dr. David Mason. Dr. Mason is the author of The End of the American Century and Revolutionary Europe: 1789-1989,  and taught Political Science at Butler for over thirty years. Pizza and soft drinks will be available. Please RSVP to bcate@butler.edu by March 1st. (Krannert Room, basement of Clowes Hall).

March 9, 7:00pm. GHS Film "Goodbye, Lenin"- This German comedy takes place in 1990, when a young man protects his fragile mother from a fatal shock after a long coma as he attempts to keep her from learning that her beloved nation of East Germany as she knew it has disappeared. (Jordan Hall 141)

March 28, 4:00pm.  "A Sufi View of the 99 Names of Allah." An Ayers lecture by Wali Ali Meyer. Sponsored by the Honors Program and GHS. (Johnson Room, Jordan Hall)

April 6, 7:00pm. GHS Film: "Adio, Kerida" ("Goodbye, Dear Love"), followed by a discussion with anthropologist and filmmaker, Ruth Behar. Free and open to the public. (Jordan Hall 141)

"Adio Kerida" is a personal documentary directed and produced by Ruth Behar about the search for identity and memory among Sephardic Jews with roots in Cuba. Dr. Behar is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Michigan.

April 8, 12:00pm. "Once Upon a Time in Africa"- A pizza chat with storyteller, Deborah Asante. Come and hear Ms. Asante tell stories from West Africa. Pizza and soft drinks will be served. (Krannert Room, basement of Clowes Hall).

April 11, 7:30pm. "Life After Trafficking in the US"- Dr. Denise Brennan.

Dr. Brennan, an associate professor of anthropology at Georgetown University, studies the confluences between migration, gender and labor, seeking to better understand how poor women and men in the developing world craft long-term labor strategies to move their families out of poverty. She is the author of What's Love Got to Do with It? Transnational Desires and Sex Tourism in the Dominican Republic, explores the connection between large structural forces in the globalized economy and their effects on individuals in a sex-tourist destination - particularly as they face hierarchies based on race, gender and citizenship. Her talk draws on new research that explores trafficking and exploitation of migrant labor in the United States. She will discuss the struggles and everyday experiences of these trafficked individuals as migrants attempting to maintain control over their work lives. Sponsored by Gender, Women's and Sexuality Studies. (Pharmacy and Health Sciences Building 150)

April 20, 7:00pm. "Framing Islam: Gender, Religion and Politics in Nigeria." A lecture by Dr. Obioma Nnaemeka, Chancellor's Professor of French and Women's Studies at IUPUI. Dr. Nnaemeka is an internationally recognized expert on the African Diaspora, African women, developing nations, globalization, multiculturalism, and human rights. (Jordan Hall 141)

April 22, 12:00pm. "Tropical Disease in Africa"- a lunchtime pizza chat with Tulane University epidemiologist, Dr. Joseph Keating. Dr. Keating's research on vector-borne illnesses has taken him to tropical countries all over the globe, including Haiti, Zambia, Eritrea and Nigeria. The presentation will last for one hour. (Ford Salon, Robertson Hall)  

Fall 2010 

September 29, 7:00pm. "Tradition and Change in Rural Tibet"- a lecture by Dr. Melvyn Goldstein, John Reynolds Harkness Professor in Anthropology and Co-Director, Center for Research on Tibet, Case Western University. Email bcate@butler.edu for more information. (Jordan Hall 141)

October 4, 6:00pm.   Film: "To Live." Originally banned in China, this moving film is set against four decades of Chinese political turmoil, and follows the lives of a couple as they struggle to survive their own changing station within the upheaval. (Jordan Hall 141)

October 7, 7:30pm.  "Transnational Feminist Practices and Methodologies." A lecture by Dr. Inderpal Grewal, Professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Yale University. (Pharmacy and Health Sciences Building 150)

October 11, 6:30pm. "Gandhian Ecology: A Way of Living in the World." Dr. Larry Shinn, President of Berea College.(Pharmacy and Health Sciences Building 150)

October 26, 7:00pm   Iranian-American writer, Reza Aslan, author of No god But God: The Origins, Evolution and Future of Islam, will give a lecture to the Butler community entitled "Peace and Conflict: The Future of Islam." Dr. Aslan has been a frequent guest on the THE DAILY SHOW, REAL TIME with Bill Maher and The Colbert report. Book signing to follow. TICKETS ARE FREE, BUT REQUIRED, AND ARE AVAILABLE AT THE CLOWES MEMORIAL HALL BOX OFFICE. (Clowes Memorial Hall)

November 8, 6:00pm. "Rivers of India: Population, Pollution and Piety." India's rivers present a paradox.  They are among the most polluted rivers in the world.  And yet, at the same time, many of them are deified, considered goddesses by pious Hindus who bathe in them daily and hope to die and be cremated along their shores.  In fact, these pieties at times obstruct attempts to address the problem of pollution, as they do in the case of the river Ganges.  After all, how could the river goddess ("Mother Ganges") be impure?  Dr. David Haberman, Professor of Religious Studies at Indiana University Bloomington, and Dr. Kelly Alley, Professor of Anthropology at Auburn University, will deal with these and other issues relevant to the rivers of India. (Jordan Hall 141)

November 29, 6:00pm  GHS will show the German film "The Lives of Others"  This critically-acclaimed, Oscar-winning film is an erotic, emotionally-charged thriller. Before the collapse of the Berlin Wall, East Germany's population was closely monitored by the State Secret Police (Stasi). Only a few citizens above suspicion, like renowned pro-Socialist playwright Georg Dreyman, were permitted to lead private lives. But when a corrupt government official falls for Georg's stunning actress-girlfriend, Christa, an ambitious Stasi policeman is ordered to bug the writer's apartment to gain incriminating evidence against the rival. Now, what the officer discovers is about to dramatically change their lives - as well as his - in this seductive political thriller Peter Travers (Rolling Stone) proclaims is "the best kind of movie: one you can't get out of your head." (description from Amazon.com). (Jordan Hall 141)

December 1, 7:00pm. GHS will show the film "Paradise Now." This film follows two Palestinian childhood friends who have been recruited for a strike on Tel Aviv and focuses on their last days together. When they are intercepted at the Israeli border and separated from their handlers, a young woman who discovers their plan causes them to reconsider their actions. (Jordan Hall 141)