College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Classics

Courses

 

The Classical Studies Program offers a major and a minor. Competence in Greek or Latin is required for the major. Familiarity is recommended but not required for the minor. Through both the major and the minor, the program aims to develop in the student an appreciation, understanding and enjoyment of classical literature and a comprehension of the abiding principles of the Western heritage. The program is also interested in students who wish to relate Classics to work in wide array of other disciplines such as English, history, modern languages, philosophy, political science, or religion,

Students may receive credit towards the major or minor for courses in Latin or Greek taken before enrolling at Butler. A student who places at the 300 level and takes two 300 level courses with a grade of C or above will receive 9 credits. A student who places into 203 and takes two 200 level courses and two 300 level courses with a grade of C or above will receive 3 credits. Students who take the AP Latin test may also receive 3 credit hours for a 200 level course.

Requirements for the major:

A minimum of 30 hours combined of CL, GK, and/or LT. A minimum of three 300 level courses in any section, including at least one 300-level course in GK or LT. Students may test out of the 200-level courses in GK or LT.

Requirements for the minor:

A minimum of 18 hours combined of CL, GK, and/or LT. A minimum of two 300-level courses all together. Note: It is recommended that students learn either Greek or Latin, at least at the beginning level. If they continue with two courses at the 200-level or above, these courses will count both towards their minor and towards fulfilling the foreign language requirement for a liberal arts degree.

Core Courses Offered by Classical Studies


TI200-CLA. Roman Perspectives: This course will examine civic engagement in the Roman world, both as a pagan and Christian capital for the West. We will undertake this investigation by looking at a variety of original sources translated into English. As we examine the texts of these authors, we will also have the opportunity to think about how the ideas of the ancient Romans have influenced cultures from Britain, France and Spain in the West to the shores of North Africa to the civilizations of the Eastern Mediterranean. (U)(3). Fall only, counts also for major/minor credit.

TI201-CLA. Ancient Greek Perspectives: An examination of areas of ancient Greek culture. Sources include texts of poetry, history, drama, law, medicine and philosophy, as well as works of art. Themes will vary depending on the professor. Possible themes: deep thinking and free thinking, participating in democracy, gender roles, warfare and empire. (U)(3). Spring only, counts also for major/minor credit.

PCA262-CLA. Greek Art & Myth: Art illuminates myth; myth makes sense of art. Students will acquire a sense of the major periods of western art, will consider artistic questions large (is art subjective? is there a proper subject matter for art?) and small (what is contrapposto?), will study in some depth about sixty artistic images, mostly Greek, and will become acquainted with a set of Greek myths. The course will include a museum visit, a skit and a creative art project. (U)(3). Fall only, counts also for major/minor credit.

Foreign Language Courses


LT101. Elementary Latin I: An introductory course that prepares the student to read the Latin prose and poetry of Virgil, Livy, Ovid and others. (U)(4). Fall only.

LT102. Elementary Latin II: An introductory course that prepares the student to read the Latin prose and poetry of Virgil, Livy, Ovid and others. LT 101 is prerequisite. (U)(4). Spring only.

LT203. Intermediate Latin I: A course at the intermediate level, with emphasis on vocabulary acquisition. Material will be chosen for accessibility. Readings may include: Cicero's orations, Virgil's Aeneid, Pliny's Letters. Prerequisite: LT 101 and 102 or placement at the 200 level. (U)(3). Fall only.

LT204. Intermediate Latin II: A course at the intermediate level, with emphasis on vocabulary acquisition. Material will be chosen for accessibility. Readings may include: Cicero's orations, Virgil's Aeneid, Pliny's Letters. Prerequisite: LT 101 and 102 or placement at the 200 level. (U)(3). Spring only.

LT301. Advanced Latin: A course at the advanced level with a vocabulary stretch and arcane points of grammar. Readings may include: Ovid's Metamorphoses, lyric poetry by Catullus, Propertius, Tibullus and Ovid, satire by Horace or Juvenal, the comedies of Plautus and Terence. This course is repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: LT 203 and 204, placement into the 300 level, or permission of the instructor. (U)(3). Spring even-numbered years.

LT360. Topics in Latin: In-depth study of works not covered in earlier courses. This course is repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: LT 203 and 204, placement into the 300 level, or permission of instructor. (U)(3). Spring odd-numbered years.

LT400, 401, 402. Independent Study: Directed reading in Latin. Consult head of department before registering. (U/G)(1, 2, 3). Fall and spring.

LT499. Honors Thesis: Thesis Research (U)(3). Fall and spring.

GK101: Elementary Greek I:Introductory course which prepares students to read the New Testament and the works of Homer, Sophocles, Plato and others. (U)(4). Occasionally.

GK102. Elementary Greek II: Introductory course which prepares students to read the New Testament and works of Homer, Sophocles, Plato and others. GK101 is a prerequisite. (U)(4). Occasionally.

GK203. Intermediate Ancient Greek: A course at the intermediate level, with emphasis on vocabulary acquisition. Material will be chosen for accessibility. Readings may include: Euripides' Alcestis, Plato's Crito, selections from Homer's Iliad or Herodotus' History or Lysias' speeches, or selections from the New Testament in Koine Greek. Prerequisite: GK 101 and 102 or placement at the 200 level. (U)(3). Occasionally.

GK204. Intermediate Greek: A course at the intermediate level, with emphasis on vocabulary acquisition. Material will be chosen for accessibility. Readings may include: Euripides' Alcestis, Plato's Crito, selections from Homer's Iliad or Herodotus' History or Lysias' speeches, or selections from the New Testament in Koine Greek. Prerequisite: GK 101 and 102 or placement at the 200 level. (U)(3). Occasionally.

GK301. Advanced Ancient Greek: A course at the advanced level with a vocabulary stretch and arcane points of grammar. Readings may include: tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles or Euripides; Plato's Apology, Symposium, Phaedrus or selections from the Republic; Thucydides Peloponnesian War. This course is repeatable for credit. The author will change each semester. Prerequisite: GK 203 and 204, placement into the 300 level, or the permission of the instructor. (U)(3). Occasionally.

GK360. Topics in Ancient Greek: In-depth study of works not covered in earlier courses. This course is repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: GK 203 and 204, placement into the 300 level, or permission of instructor. (U)(3). Occasionally.

GK400, 401, 402. Independent Study: Directed reading in Greek. Consult head of department before registering. (U)(1,2,3). Occasionally.

GK499. Honors Thesis: Thesis Research (U)(3). Fall and spring.

Classical Studies Courses

 

CLA301. Epic Poetry: An in-depth study of the ancient epic. Course will focus on Homer's Iliad, Homer's Odyssey or Virgil's Aeneid. Other material will be brought in as background. (U)(3). Spring even-numbered years.

CLA302. Lyric Poetry/Love Poetry: An in-depth study of ancient love poetry. Course will focus on love poetry in Greek and Latin. Other ancient love poetry (Hebrew, Sanskrit, Chinese) may be included. (U)(3). Fall odd-numbered years.

CLA303. Drama on the Ancient Stage: Course may focus on Greek or Roman tragedy or comedy. Performance may be part of the course. (U)(3). Fall even-numbered years.

CLA304. History of Ancient Philosophy: A study of important figures of ancient philosophy, with particular emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. Prerequisite: One philosophy course or permission of instructor. (U)(3). Every third semester.

CLA360. Topics in Classics: In-depth study of special topics not covered in regular courses. (U)(3). Spring only. Past topics have included:

  • Transformations in Mythology
  • Ancient Law

CLA400, 401, 402. Independent Study:Individual study of a specific topic in Classics that does not involve the reading of Latin or Greek texts.(U)(1,2,3). Occasionally.

Courses Offered Through Other Departments

 

HS 326. Sex, Gender, Love and Friendship in the Classical World: Examines classical Mediterranean culture from the inside out. Course focuses upon dimensions of private life and interplay between private and public worlds. Discussion/seminar format. (U/G)(3)

PO 381. Ancient and Medieval Political Thought:  This course examines the foundation of Western political thought and considers the ways in which the successors of a tradition simultaneously criticize and incorporate the work of their predecessors as they seek to construct new theories of politics. (U-G) (3)