Olivia ’12 RSS feed

About Me:

My name is Olivia and I am a senior at Butler University. I spend most of my time in Lilly Hall as a BFA Dance Performance major. When not in rehearsal or ballet class, I write papers for my English Literature second major. In my super-abundant, never-lacking, this-is-highly-sarcastic spare time, I attempt to cook in my apartment kitchen, watch Youtube videos of ballet, knit sweaters that never seem to come to an end, and read books both silly and serious. If I could take any class at Butler just for kicks, I'd go for DiffyQ.

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Posts Tagged “summer”

What to do during your summer

Whether you are a high school junior/senior thinking about college, a college student in-between semesters, or someone just out of school, summer offers precious time to study and to play. The Butler Admissions guest blog wrote about some great suggestions for spending your summer, and of course I have to add my two cents! ;)

I’ve done things a bit differently every summer since I graduated from high school. Let’s recap, shall we?

  • Summer after I graduated from high school: I was lucky enough to travel the world with both my grandparents and my nuclear family, then to dance for a good chunk of the rest of the summer at home.
  • After freshman year: I was a nanny three-four days a week and danced on my off days.
  • After sophomore: I attended a summer dance intensive.
  • After junior year: I participated in Butler Summer Institute doing English research… and danced.
  • After senior year: So far I’ve finished that last French class required to graduate, danced in the Southern Illinois Music Festival, and am currently teaching movement classes to children. Soon I will move to Tulsa, OK!

In the process of doing each of these different activities I’ve come to appreciate the importance of two things: work and play.

Those two about cover the gamut of options, n’est-ce pas? But really, working, whether it be as a nanny, researcher, dancer, or teacher truly drove home the lessons I learned in class. Even if I didn’t quite understand everything said in my Teaching Analysis of Classical Dance class last semester, I am now remembering little details, seeing them played out in front of me. Even if I didn’t always realize the lessons in professionalism and technique my dance classes at Butler imparted, I found myself drawing on them for reference while dancing in southern Illinois.

However, as a type-A all the way, I was surprised to realize the equal importance of playing. After my summer of BSI and English classes and the stress of trying to keep in ballet-shape while conducting a huge research project, I entered senior year a bit tired. No worries, right? However, by the second semester, I think I had burned out a little with my English studies. Dancing, no problem. (Which is good news, since that’s what I’ll be doing full time next year!) Writing another English paper? The thought kind of made me gag. Already with a few weeks break, I’m back on my reading diet of Dylan Thomas… but I want to hold off on that paper for a few more months at least.

So take a risk this summer, be it structured (a job, a class, an internship, a research project, a volunteer position) or not. But don’t forget to veg a bit! Butler (or any other institution, I imagine), will have you hopping for the full academic year, and it really is vital to take those lazy days to rest and read and bake cookies in your pajamas. Personally, I like cleaning my room with a book on tape. Whatever floats your boat.

Playing in the park!

After Graduation (i.e. Employment)

What does a dance major/English lit major do after graduation? After all, those two majors — a BFA and a humanities, liberal arts BA — hardly lend themselves to employment, right? WRONG.

This summer is shaping up to be quite a busy one. Besides my ongoing French independent study (which, yes, takes between two and three hours a day), I’m also preparing for two other short-term summer jobs. Also, I’m interviewing for another.

Also, I’m sorting through the mass of items I accumulated at Butler over the course of four years. This is what comes from never moving out completely, then suddenly transporting all of it home at once:

This was just the first load... Multiply by four, then square. That's how much stuff I am sorting/donating/etcing.

But back to the important things, those things your parents will ask you when you tell them you want to major in Dance Performance and English Literature… What kinds of jobs can you get?

This summer I:

  • am interviewing for a position as a substitute teacher at a local ballet studio. Teaching is always an option, even for those still in school, especially if you have taken pedagogy classes.
  • am dancing in the Southern Illinois Music Festival’s productions of The Firebird and Petrouchka.
  • am teaching movement classes at the Indianapolis Children’s Choir day camp.

Then in July it’s off to Tulsa to start with Tulsa Ballet II — time to return to the real world after four years of college. I suppose it will be a bit like my time as a trainee at the Richmond Ballet… but I guess I’ll find out when I get there. For now, I’m plenty busy writing pages of French, learning Firebird choreography off of Youtube, and developing the class plan for the ICC kids.

And those are the various odd jobs I’m doing this summer by virtue of my BFA/BA degrees! (Well, these are mostly from my BFA, but I like to flatter myself into thinking the BA helps me communicate clearly, an essential part of any job.) (Except, you know, these posts tend to be extremely rambling, so perhaps I’m not presenting myself to my best advantage. Oh well.)

The End of the Year and Beyond…

I just realized I have not posted since Sunday — where has the week gone? We graduate so soon, yet so much lies between me and a diploma. Namely:

  • Coppélia production and performance
  • dance and academic finals
  • Senior English Essay — workshopped and now awaiting revisions
  • two or three final projects in other classes
  • A French class, which I might be taking as an independent study

This summer is wide open. I hope I’ll finish that French class so I can actually graduate in August (though I’ll still walk in Commencement). I might have a guesting job in Illinois, and of course I wouldn’t want to miss the beach with my family! Then… I start dancing with Tulsa Ballet II at the end of July! :)

I tweeted about this a while ago:

And when I opened Butler’s student newspaper yesterday, I saw I made the back page, where the Collegian staff quotes some Butler-related tweets seen in the last week. I’m famous!

The GREs: Another Summer Story

Once upon a time, a girl named Olivia decided to study for two majors. She left her family’s hut on the edge of the woods and ventured deep into the forest. When the weather changed and it was time for most young lads and lasses to return to their families’ dwellings (they take advantage of the summer light to chop wood for their families’ winter stock of fuel), Olivia found a group of youths who decided to stay in the woods. This was called BSI.

Then once that bunch of young people trickled back toward the perimeter of leaf cover, Olivia wandered through the forest alone once more, part of the diffuse group comprised of those doing independent studies. While sustaining membership in this rather scattered crowd, she passed several hours in the company of an assembly of yet more lads and lasses. This was known as the GRE, the Graduate Requisite Exam.

This assembly, however, stuck out in a bold new direction. No longer did they circle the campfire in search of antonyms; no longer did the ceremony adapt question by question. Instead, they worked on a full body of arcane trivia before the spirit of the proceedings determined in what vein the questioning should advance. This was known as a computer adapted test which adjusted difficulty section by section rather than question by question.

In sort, Olivia survived the long ritual but remains at large in the forest, still weaving daisy chains (i.e. English papers) for her independent study, slowly going loopy, while the majority of Butler lasses and lads prepare to return to the forest of academia.

When Not Writing Papers

You might notice I have quite a few posts have the tag “papers” attached. I’m taking a break from the latest one to write this blog post. That’s called procrastination, and college teaches young adults to do this with gusto.

Anyway, I do more than just write papers (and dance). I’m typing this in part to convince myself. After BSI ended, I started an independent study with an English professor that will let me finish my second major without staying longer than eight semesters or going over credit hours (like last semester). But I don’t write papers all the time. I don’t. Instead I:

  • Play card games, mahjong games, and Bananagrams with my family. Sometimes at the pool.
  • Swim a bunch of laps after being lazy for a while. Usually at the pool.
  • Dance. Sometimes in the pool.
  • Get all worked up and sucked into media frenzies. (Like with the debt ceiling, which in retrospect looks more like drama and less like crisis.) (Still, I want a job.) (Seriously, is anyone hiring?)
  • Play the piano.
  • Read easy-to-understand magazines — NOT scholarly articles. (Though I did love Hildegard Tristram’s “Near-Sameness in Early Insular Metrics.” It contained Welsh mutations as a matter of obvious fact. I swooned in a completely geeked-out fashion.)
  • Restart my duties as president of the Butler Catholic Community. New students — look for us at Block Party, which is a huge conglomeration of tables where every club imaginable tries to trade your email address for free gear!

I’ve been working, in one way or another, all summer, so it’s hard to believe I’ll be back at Butler in three short weeks. Classes start Wednesday, August 24 — I’ll see you there! If you should happen to find me in the midst of festivities, please don’t hesitate to ask questions about any and everything Butler/college/ballet/English/knitting/Welsh/rabbits/cooking failures/etc!

I took this with my point-and-shoot. This should give some indication of the beauty of Butler's campus in the fall.

The above photo should also be rather large, if anyone has been looking for Butler-themed images to use as wallpaper for a computer screen. I can share. Just click on the picture for a larger size.

BSI Winds Down

A few highlights from the end of BSI:

I went to my first midnight premier of the Harry Potter movie with a group of students through the Butler summer residence halls. Here a BSI student wins my personal award for best costume of the night as a CleanSweep7 broomstick. I myself dressed in a red tank top and red skirt, tied a red scarf around my waist, and attached my red ballet skirt to my wrists and back — I was Fawkes, and I did not have feathers, and the costume was rather a flop. I enjoyed the movie, but the previews were too scary for me!!

Here we are at the BSI final dinner. I’m in the corner with other students and mentors, trying not to laugh out loud.

However, our basement apartment in UT (which was really much dirtier than I originally thought), soon suffered from an invasion of ants. I woke up in the morning with one crawling on my stomach. Though I emailed maintenance and they responded, they must have decided to wait until we moved out to deal with them, which was a bit icky. I know it’s summer and ants aren’t that threatening and pest control makes a room unlivable for a while… but come on, Butler. At least tell us you were going to wait until after the session. Mental preparation and all.

Funnily enough, most of the other students whose presentation photos were taken from this angle had more than just a head showing — I’m rather short. We finally presented the fruits of our BSI labors to all the BSI participants and whichever other students/faculty/mentors/staff/etc wanted to come.

I was nervous about my presentation at first; while I practiced I kept stumbling over my words so I finally had to type out a truncated script. Then I worried I would read from a piece of paper rather than make eye contact and all that. But something magical happened on Monday morning when I stood up in front of that room. Some combination of nerves and enthusiasm made all the words come out in the right order, in a short-enough timeframe, in an apparently coherent-enough way to merit detailed questions and positive responses. Hooray!

Congratulations to all BSI participants! You can view titles of projects and pictures from the program here. You can see the slideshow I made to accompany my presentation here.

Final BSI Dinner

Wow. BSI is over. Students have been presenting Friday through Wednesday (today) for two or three hours each morning. We had our final BSI lunch Tuesday night, and I spent a lovely evening with four other students, a history professor, a creative writing professor, and two chemistry professors. Since the students consisted of two international studies majors, two creative writing majors, and me (Dance performance and English Lit), I was glad we didn’t talk about super artsy things the entire night. Got to let the science people have their say. : )

I learned that “aromatic” means something different in chemistry than in the rest of the world. This means, “So someone told me ethers were like aromatic rabbits” does not make for quite the conversation starter I thought it might. Turns out “aromatic” isn’t quite the word, and I would have done better quoting my friend’s actual “smelly bunnies.” Instead, I discovered “aromatic” refers to the configuration of bonds. (Is that it? Is that even close?)

It also turns out, with some quick internet searching, that I might have confused “ether” and “ester,” since esters are definitely smelly, but ethers look more like rabbits. Well, I found a snazzy dimethyl ether on wikipedia…

It also, also turns out that chemists are people too and thus perfectly well qualified to speak on matters other than chemistry. Still, I do love some chemistry talk. This summer has been wonderful, getting to hear about all the science projects. After listening to an explanation of the G-protein receptors project about four times, I think I might sort of get it!

Watching the chemistry presentations was definitely harder than the others, since so much of the basic language tends to baffle the average liberal arts major. (I still don’t know the difference between a substrate and a reagent. I vaguely understand the function of primers.) I finally, finally got a grasp on “stereochemistry,” and line structures aren’t quite so mystifying. I think the chemistry presentations did a good job of catering to a mixed, partially non-science audience.

But dinner! Dinner was at Shanghi Lil’s in Indianapolis with all the BSI students and the large percentage of mentors who could make it. Dinner was served family-style, as all Chinese meals should be served, and it was absolutely delicious. Pineapple shrimp. Pineapple. Shrimp. Pineapple shrimp. Genius.

(I also just typed “pinaepple” every single time I attempted to write “pineapple.”)

I will have to update you on the ant infestation in our apartment and on final presentations… but now I simply must go make some toast and Skype with a friend.

BSI Roundup

This summer, I read and I wrote, then I read a bit more, got distracted, regathered my focus, and wrote again. Let’s compare the stats, shall we?

As of  the morning of July 14, 2011,

Number of Word documents associated with BSI project: was 43, now 85

Number of paper drafts: was 2, now 17

Words written in current paper draft: was 3907, now 7488

Number of sources read in whole or in part: was 11, now 22

Times the current paper draft uses the word “Anglo-Celtic”: was 4, now 10

Times the current paper draft uses the word “Welsh”: was 35, now 116

Times the current paper draft uses the word “Irish”: was 46, now 70

Times the current paper draft uses the word “Wales”: was 23, now 43

Times the current paper draft uses the word “Ireland”: was 21, now 49

Times the current paper draft uses the word “tradition” or “traditional”: no previous statistic, now 104

Times the current paper draft uses the word “bard”: no previous statistic, now 146

Times the current paper draft uses the word “bardic”: no previous statistic, now 49

Cups of tea consumed: was ??, now ????

Websites most visited: was Butler email, BBC News, RSS reader, Facebook, and Pandora, now Butler email, BBC News, Youtube, this blog page, and the Welsh National Eisteddfod page

Outside of BSI research, I did all this stuff:

BSI Events: First FridaysKeep Indianapolis Beautiful, many lunches with mentors, GRE explaining, IMA exploring, Indians baseball game (Whoops, I didn’t post pictures for that one. Mostly because it was the longest game ever and we spent most of the time bandying about science jokes: see below), discussions about ethics, discussions about presentations…

Other activities: raspberry sale at the grocery store, piano lessons with my friend, breakfast in Broad Ripple, breakfast downtown, ballet classes, Chicago trip, Bananagrams, biking to church, biking to the coffee shop, CD making, picture drawing, GRE practice test taking, knitting, Wii night, bingo night, trip to Richmond to see my sister graduate…

A lot has happened this summer!

Does anyone else have fun statistics from their summer break to share? Visits to the pool, popsicles consumed, ballet classes attended, books read?

Summer classes at Butler

The Butler campus is certainly busier during the Summer II session than during Summer I. I’m not sure why, but it looks like more happens. Summer I felt like life in a ghost town. The weather was nicer though, since it’s becoming hotter day by day — though still nothing like the humid Richmond weather!

The sky over the Butler Bowl during a beautiful summer day.

Summer I and Summer II are the names of Butler’s summer sessions. I’m here for part of Summer I and part of Summer II, since BSI runs on its own schedule. However, each summer session is six weeks long and offers different classes.

Fun fact: Classes during the summer don’t necessarily run for the full six weeks. I did not realize this at first. Classes that run only three of the six weeks might meet for several hours four or five days a week, while those that run the full summer session could meet only twice or three times a week. Does that sound like an easy schedule? Imagine doing a semester’s worth of reading and papers in four weeks. Yikes!

Summer classes are a great way to fulfill extra requirements if you have a busy schedule or are switching majors. Just look at the price tag first, because with housing and tuition, summer classes can add up!

Power + Outage = Chicago

A scheduled power outage for maintenance this weekend on Butler campus meant stuff stopped happening from Friday to Monday. This meant I could jet off to Chicago to spend a few days with my boyfriend and his family.

(“Jet off” is another term for “take the Megabus, which will come an hour late and have you praying several times during the highway portion of the trip.”)

It was wonderful. There was the hospitality of my boyfriend’s family (could not say enough). There was Chicago (Taste, Millennium Park, Chinatown, Navy Pier). There was piano playing, my first dim sum experience, a movie, a train, a far too sugary cinnamon sugar pretzel, siopao, surprisingly delicious pancit canton, fruit salad with condensed milk and coconut, this somehow turned into a list of the food I ate while I was there….

If I had to spend July 4th away from my home in Richmond, I think got the best possible of scenarios.

Taste of Chicago

My first dim sum experience: delicious and entertaining

The OTHER side of Navy Pier

Lunch with wonderful people

NOTE: power + outage = chicago

a = 1, g = 2, p = 3, r = 4, t = 5, u = 6, w = 7, c = 8, h = 9, i = 10, e = 20

OR

char letter[] = {‘a’, ‘g’, ‘p’, ‘r’, ‘t’, ‘u’, ‘w’, ‘c’, ‘h’, ‘i’, ‘e’};

for(int x = 0; x < 10; x++){

cout << letter[x] << ” = ” << x + 1;

cout << “, “;

if(x = 9) cout << letter[10] << ” = 20″;

}

magicmagic();

ETCETERA…