Olivia ’12 RSS feed

About Me:

My name is Olivia and I am a senior at Butler University. I spend most of my time in Lilly Hall as a BFA Dance Performance major. When not in rehearsal or ballet class, I write papers for my English Literature second major. In my super-abundant, never-lacking, this-is-highly-sarcastic spare time, I attempt to cook in my apartment kitchen, watch Youtube videos of ballet, knit sweaters that never seem to come to an end, and read books both silly and serious. If I could take any class at Butler just for kicks, I'd go for DiffyQ.

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Posts Tagged “rabbits”

Under the mountain

I am writing from under a veritable mountain of homework (unlike Steph, who actually climbed a mountain!). Reasons for mountain formation:

1. The Nutcracker: Our last show was this past Sunday, and we took lots of senior pictures, and I did not get as emotional as I thought I would, but I cried after our modern final today because the modern teacher is going on sabbatical. I feel good about the performances I gave — I’m never quite satisfied, since there always seem to be areas to improve — but the faculty had some good things to say. I felt calmer and more in control on stage this run than ever before… and I had a lot of fun as well. But I’m horribly behind on homework now.

2. Finals week: I’m also under a mountain of work because academic finals are next week. I have two English classes and two dance academics… I’m most concerned about the big English paper I have due this coming Monday, where I’ll be talking about Edenic metaphors in Frank Norris’ The Pit. Key phrase: “I’ll be.” As in, “I have not yet.” As in, my paper is thus far just a bullet-pointed version of my project proposal.

Oh dear.

One of my doodles from freshman year... It still speaks to me.

Dance finals are this week, too, and I’ve finished half of my pointe final and my modern final. We did contemporary pas and classical partnering before The Nutcracker, so I just have one more pointe class and my ballet technique final to go! More about dance finals later, I suppose.

I am thankful for family

I am thankful for my family. You don’t realize how unique your family is until you go to college, live with other teenagers, and hear the stories. I did not know how ridiculous family jokes do not quite translate to the uninitiated. I did not realize what varying types of love we show our siblings. I especially did not anticipate my love of rabbits trebling five times twenty-three.

It’s good to be home this week. Remember to stay in touch with your family when you begin college, and cherish those times you get to spend with them. (Even when they drive you nuts).

My family likes Bananagrams.

My pet rabbits were excited to see me when I landed in Richmond on Saturday night.

Stay-in-touch tips? Use Skype, text pictures of your lunch to your dad, write real letters to your mom, and make sure share the silly stories when you return during a break from school.

BSI Wrap-Up

After BSI ended, my roommate and I moved out in the insufferable heat. Because we are living in the same apartment as last year, we paid a fee to store our belongings in the apartment during the summer; thus the journey from UT to AV was not that far. The heat stretched the distances, though, and I ended up leaving Butler an hour later than planned.

Also, I have now lived in every non-Greek Butler residence hall except for Ross.

After leaving Butler, I visited my boyfriend and his family in Chicago, and it was epic as usual: spending time with wonderful people, eating wonderful food, playing wonderful games of badminton, and learning the wonderfully addictive game of mahjong. I need to get a set so I can learn to tell the contents of a tile simply by feeling it with my fingers. I’ve seen it in action, and it is incredibly intimidating. We stayed up well past midnight and shouted Chinese and Spanish words and generally had a grand time.

Now I am home playing with my sisters and my parents and my rabbit, as well as studying for the GRE (taking it soon in August) and working on an independent study (for a Butler English class to attain my second major). It’s been busy, but it is wonderful to be home!

The bunnies say “hi.”

Final BSI Dinner

Wow. BSI is over. Students have been presenting Friday through Wednesday (today) for two or three hours each morning. We had our final BSI lunch Tuesday night, and I spent a lovely evening with four other students, a history professor, a creative writing professor, and two chemistry professors. Since the students consisted of two international studies majors, two creative writing majors, and me (Dance performance and English Lit), I was glad we didn’t talk about super artsy things the entire night. Got to let the science people have their say. : )

I learned that “aromatic” means something different in chemistry than in the rest of the world. This means, “So someone told me ethers were like aromatic rabbits” does not make for quite the conversation starter I thought it might. Turns out “aromatic” isn’t quite the word, and I would have done better quoting my friend’s actual “smelly bunnies.” Instead, I discovered “aromatic” refers to the configuration of bonds. (Is that it? Is that even close?)

It also turns out, with some quick internet searching, that I might have confused “ether” and “ester,” since esters are definitely smelly, but ethers look more like rabbits. Well, I found a snazzy dimethyl ether on wikipedia…

It also, also turns out that chemists are people too and thus perfectly well qualified to speak on matters other than chemistry. Still, I do love some chemistry talk. This summer has been wonderful, getting to hear about all the science projects. After listening to an explanation of the G-protein receptors project about four times, I think I might sort of get it!

Watching the chemistry presentations was definitely harder than the others, since so much of the basic language tends to baffle the average liberal arts major. (I still don’t know the difference between a substrate and a reagent. I vaguely understand the function of primers.) I finally, finally got a grasp on “stereochemistry,” and line structures aren’t quite so mystifying. I think the chemistry presentations did a good job of catering to a mixed, partially non-science audience.

But dinner! Dinner was at Shanghi Lil’s in Indianapolis with all the BSI students and the large percentage of mentors who could make it. Dinner was served family-style, as all Chinese meals should be served, and it was absolutely delicious. Pineapple shrimp. Pineapple. Shrimp. Pineapple shrimp. Genius.

(I also just typed “pinaepple” every single time I attempted to write “pineapple.”)

I will have to update you on the ant infestation in our apartment and on final presentations… but now I simply must go make some toast and Skype with a friend.

Researchical insights: Another quality post

Summer.

I cannot form nice sentences any longer. For at least another two weeks. It’s all lazy mornings with my pet bunnies and sunshine.

And I have exhausted my English-language skills. They will need these two weeks to recover, I fear. Yup. So.

I produced twenty-one new pages of writing in the last three days at Butler. Altogether, my three final papers clocked in at exactly thirty-three pages.

Eight pages of dance history. Nine for a paper on Nathaniel Hawthorne and his deviant characters and Hepzibah’s shop and the railroad á la Christopher Castiglia and Leo Marx. Sixteen on Emily Dickinson. I say she not only deserves the attention of the postmodern scholarship community, but she also possesses herself a postmodern understanding of language.

If you examine her ideas of death and Heaven and knowledge, you find that her binary oppositions are wonky. Death is connected to absolutes and divinity and comfort. Hmmm.

I wrote a paper over spring break on Emily Dickinson, after reading a hundred and fourteen of Emily Dickinson’s poems. For my final, I researched the current discourse surrounding Dickinson from a postmodernist viewpoint and revised my paper to place it into conversation with the scholarly community.

And that’s what a dance/English major writes at the end of junior semester.

Merry Christmas

I hope everyone is having a nice holiday. Here’s what my Christmas looked like when we gathered all the wrapping paper in a huge pile and set the baby rabbits loose to play. Distributing pictures of bunnies frolicking in holiday paper is a fairly good method of contributing more joy to the world, I would say. I only hope Butler’s mascot Blue II had as good time as my pet rabbits Beezus and Ramona this holiday.

The rabbits pose for their glamor shots.

The entire family gathered around and took pictures and pictures of the rabbits. Of course, I did not want to use my flash, and the bunnies kept jumping around, so out of the 244 pictures I took, I kept 33. Those thirty-three? Soooo cute.

Nadolig Llawen and Joyuex  Noël and Frohe Weihnachten and Maligayang Pasko and so on… Happy holidays!

New Additions to the Family

This summer, our beloved rabbit passed away. I still don’t like to talk about it much, but there is some new, exciting news on the lagomorph front:

BABY BUNNIES!!! OMGoodness to the ^n!!1!!!1!1!

Ramona and Beezus

After the Homecoming game on Saturday, I saw I had fifteen missed messages and two voicemails–all but one rabbit-related. We had been talking about getting another rabbit, and I asked my family to wait until November so I didn’t miss the cute baby, short-nosed stage (since I’ll go home for Thanksgiving). But they just could not hold out, and one can hardly blame them. Look at those faces.

Ramona is a blue-grey Netherlands Dwarf, and Beezus is the fluffy lionhead. They are named after the characters from the Beverly Cleary novels. Wonderful books. Wonderful bunnies.

Beezus

Incoming college students, I’ll telling you now: You will miss your pets. Horribly. It definitely helps to have a family willing to send you picture after picture (after picture…). I even have some video. It’s a bit crazy actually. And now I have even more reason to look forward to Thanksgiving break: There will be two new family members to love.