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About Me:

My name is Olivia and I am a senior at Butler University. I spend most of my time in Lilly Hall as a BFA Dance Performance major. When not in rehearsal or ballet class, I write papers for my English Literature second major. In my super-abundant, never-lacking, this-is-highly-sarcastic spare time, I attempt to cook in my apartment kitchen, watch Youtube videos of ballet, knit sweaters that never seem to come to an end, and read books both silly and serious. If I could take any class at Butler just for kicks, I'd go for DiffyQ.

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Posts Tagged “good”

What to do during your summer

Whether you are a high school junior/senior thinking about college, a college student in-between semesters, or someone just out of school, summer offers precious time to study and to play. The Butler Admissions guest blog wrote about some great suggestions for spending your summer, and of course I have to add my two cents! ;)

I’ve done things a bit differently every summer since I graduated from high school. Let’s recap, shall we?

  • Summer after I graduated from high school: I was lucky enough to travel the world with both my grandparents and my nuclear family, then to dance for a good chunk of the rest of the summer at home.
  • After freshman year: I was a nanny three-four days a week and danced on my off days.
  • After sophomore: I attended a summer dance intensive.
  • After junior year: I participated in Butler Summer Institute doing English research… and danced.
  • After senior year: So far I’ve finished that last French class required to graduate, danced in the Southern Illinois Music Festival, and am currently teaching movement classes to children. Soon I will move to Tulsa, OK!

In the process of doing each of these different activities I’ve come to appreciate the importance of two things: work and play.

Those two about cover the gamut of options, n’est-ce pas? But really, working, whether it be as a nanny, researcher, dancer, or teacher truly drove home the lessons I learned in class. Even if I didn’t quite understand everything said in my Teaching Analysis of Classical Dance class last semester, I am now remembering little details, seeing them played out in front of me. Even if I didn’t always realize the lessons in professionalism and technique my dance classes at Butler imparted, I found myself drawing on them for reference while dancing in southern Illinois.

However, as a type-A all the way, I was surprised to realize the equal importance of playing. After my summer of BSI and English classes and the stress of trying to keep in ballet-shape while conducting a huge research project, I entered senior year a bit tired. No worries, right? However, by the second semester, I think I had burned out a little with my English studies. Dancing, no problem. (Which is good news, since that’s what I’ll be doing full time next year!) Writing another English paper? The thought kind of made me gag. Already with a few weeks break, I’m back on my reading diet of Dylan Thomas… but I want to hold off on that paper for a few more months at least.

So take a risk this summer, be it structured (a job, a class, an internship, a research project, a volunteer position) or not. But don’t forget to veg a bit! Butler (or any other institution, I imagine), will have you hopping for the full academic year, and it really is vital to take those lazy days to rest and read and bake cookies in your pajamas. Personally, I like cleaning my room with a book on tape. Whatever floats your boat.

Playing in the park!

The practical uses of having stellar sports teams

1. Charity

Butler’s mascot, English bulldog Blue II, has been getting the star treatment over the last few weeks. (Actually, who are we kidding? He gets the star treatment all the time.) While in Houston, Blue II served as the inspiration for a martini. This isn’t just more attention lavished on the hound, though. Proceeds from the drink sold at the hotel in Houston go to the Houston SPCA and the Butler mascot fund. Woof!

2. Inspiration

Excerpt from a ballet teacher’s pre-class speech: “You have to be like the basketball team. Ballet, basketball, not so different. Well, it’s a little different, I mean, you are dancers. But you have work hard just like the team. They don’t take days off. They don’t give up.” And it went on like that. By the end, I was ready to shoot some three-pointers, erm, do some triple pirouettes.

3. Explanation

How were we supposed to perform a jump in our Modern 3/4 class? Was there a specific position where we hit rétiré, or were we just to move through the air?

“Just move through the position,” said our modern professor. But we were to get some air. She told us about a certain picture of a certain member of a certain basketball team. “He was,” gesturing, “this high off the ground. That’s what you have to do.”

Be Chrishawn Hopkins. Okay, dancing, go!

FLY!

How to fix a bike; or, The kindness of Butler fans

Use a hammer and some pliers and bang on it pathetically until the sprocket evens out enough to slip the chain back on.

Alternately, one could do the above near a bike rack in the Apartment Village during the Butler football game. (If the Apartment Village were any closer to the Butler Bowl, they’d be playing football in the kitchens.) One student had his family with him, and the father was cooking hot dogs on a portable grill (so cool–I’ll get a George Foreman or something like this one day). He immediately offered to help.

“Oh, thank you,” I said, “but if you just tell me what to do, I can do it.” I held up my hands: They were covered with grease stains.

“No, no,” he said. Whereupon he flipped the bike over, told his son to run into the apartment to get paper towels, and stretched his hand out for the hammer. Bless him.

When we were done straightening the sprocket and coaxing the chain back through all the various loops, I took it for an experimental lap around the Apartment Village. The Butler student, his mother, and his father were eating hot dogs and watching the Butler Bowl action from the grassy area near the bike rack when I returned. I gave a triumphant thumbs-up and thanked the family profusely.

“No problem,” the father said. “Would you like a hot dog?”

No, but thank you. Butler bulldogs. They never let  you down.