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About Me:

My name is Olivia and I am a senior at Butler University. I spend most of my time in Lilly Hall as a BFA Dance Performance major. When not in rehearsal or ballet class, I write papers for my English Literature second major. In my super-abundant, never-lacking, this-is-highly-sarcastic spare time, I attempt to cook in my apartment kitchen, watch Youtube videos of ballet, knit sweaters that never seem to come to an end, and read books both silly and serious. If I could take any class at Butler just for kicks, I'd go for DiffyQ.

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Posts Tagged “books”

Back to school booklist

Spring semester (which is actually the semester of continued winter misery and a wee bit of spring sun) is quickly approaching! Butler University resumes classes on Jan 18 this year, which is the day after Martin Luther King Jr. Day. That’s pretty late. We have had about three weeks for the last two years: This year’s winter break between the fall and spring semesters was a month-long affair.

However pleasant an affair it was, break is drawing to an end. This means I should try to start waking up a bit earlier. This means I should think about wearing more layers when I go back to Butler. This means I should think about taking full responsibility for my own food and laundry again. (Thanks, Mom… *sheepish*) This means looking forward to reuniting with my friends at Butler again! This also means buying textbooks.

Ugh. I despise buying textbooks. I think I did a really good job this semester, though. I got half my books through Butler’s bookstore and half with the website Better World Books (which is actually mentioned on the second page of an article in the New York Times), all for just over one hundred dollars.

I’ve got a lot of reading–and annotating–ahead of me. Also, marathon readings of Moby-Dick?

Supposed to be about my living room

I realize my picture posts of Butler’s junior/senior housing (four-bedroom apartments in the Apartment Village) have been somewhat spread out over the year. I posted a kitchen tour in September and my bedroom tour in November. Now, I’ll tie up some loose ends with the living room tour!

The kitchen area and living room are not separated by walls, but the carpet in the living room section gives the spaces some sense of division. Unlike the bedrooms, where the bed and desk and so on come with the rental of the apartment, the living room is completely and utterly unfurnished. It’s a good thing I have roommates with impeccable taste.

This photo has been sitting in my computer, gathering pixel-dust for ages, since by the end of the semester, the bookcase was completely stuffed. We keep cookbooks and some games on it, and the rest–I am afraid to admit–is all mine: textbooks, Norton Anthologies (I’m collecting them, apparently), library books, and books I somehow acquire.

If you’ve read my blog for a while, you will know I love books. My bookshelf at home is currently completely full, and I’ve had to resort to using a box on the floor in front of the shelf. I have a system, however! All the books on my shelf, I have read. All the books in the box, I have yet to read. Clever, huh? Sort of.

Here is an awkward Photobooth picture of my bookshelf. You cannot see, because there is a seating object in the way, but I have another shelf below the lowest one in the picture. Oh dear.

Plus there are books in a stack on the floor which I must donate. Plus there are library books on my childhood toy chest. Plus more books which I read at night on my bedside table. This break, I haven’t read as much as was wont in years past, which seems to be this semester’s theme. Let’s see. This break I’ve read, in order of completion:

  • James Joyce, by John Gross: a book of essays on James Joyce
  • A War of Gifts, by Orson Scott Card: a novella in the Ender’s Game world that I purchased from the Butler bookstore on my birthday ages and ages ago
  • Something Borrowed, by Elizabeth Giffin: a Christmas present from my roommate (aka, the requisite chick lit)
  • Einstein’s Dreams, by Alan Lightman: radiant
  • Ender’s Game, by Orson Scott Card again: a reread of an old book for a friend
  • three-eighths of The Sound and the Fury, by William Faulkner
  • three-fourths of A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, by James Joyce

And… I just now realized this post has deviated somewhat from its promised subject. Whoops! Look for more apartment pictures in the future, I suppose.

On the merits of dawdling

I kind of like hanging out at Butler for a few days after I’m finished with my last exams. I am always anxious to see my family, but I like staying afterwards for several reasons. Which I shall list:

1. I have time to clean my room, my kitchen, my restroom, my living room… Towards the end of the semester, items tend to pile up. I know myself. I know I won’t suddenly become organized in the last days of cramming for finals. I know I won’t do laundry when my monster physics test makes menacing sounds from its corner. I know I won’t be packed and ready to go right after my last final. I definitely won’t have cleaned my refrigerator of items like milk and spinach.

2. I like spending time with my Butler friends. The people I have met at Butler are among my closest confidants (as dramatic as that surely sounds), and I often feel like I don’t have a chance to enjoy their company during the academic year. For example, I watched my roommate watch her croutons brown in the oven on Thursday. How often does that happen during the semester?

3. I have unintentionally developed a ritual at the end of each semester. For the third semester running, I ended up in the basement of Irwin library, reading Shaun Tan‘s magnificent Tales From Outer Suburbia. Obviously I budget time for this.

4. Living in the Apartment Village this semester, I first experienced the challenge of eating all perishables before leaving the campus. I like to think my roommate and I did a rather good job. All I had to throw out was some homemade whipped cream, half a stick of butter, and some carrots. We managed to eat a bag and a half of spinach in two days. I made a spinach-egg frittata on Thursday night, and this morning? Well, this was the epic morning of crepes.

A friend and I have had a long-standing date to make banana pancakes. However, I decided to admit that pancakes are not exactly my strong suit, so we made crepes instead.

The last time I had a pancake-breakfast party with a friend, this is what happened:

Looks good, right?

False!

Very false!

Crepes, besides being in my grasp skill-wise, are excellent vehicles for using up ingredients like bananas and cheese and spinach. I would include “not all at once” in that statement, except my friend concocted–and ate–a banana, spinach, cheese, and Nutella crepe. I decided to give that one a pass.

All this said, I am excited to go home for the winter break! Richmond, here I come!

Procrastination tactics

I have so much to do. So instead of doing it, I shall proceed to complain about it. Even though I secretly love it all. (And I’d better, since I’m paying for it.)

But seriously, yo. It’s Fall Break. What have I read in the past three days?

  • Jonathan Culler, On Deconstruction, preface, introduction, and section 1, omitting only pages 43-64. Next to a dictionary.
  • Ronald Gene Roland, Divided Ireland: Bifocal Vision in Modern Irish Drama, preface, and chapter six prelude “The Beginning of the End of Gaelic Language and Culture” and the article “Friel’s Translations: the Ritual of Naming.”
  • Josephine Lee, “Linguistic Imperialism, the Early Abbey Theatre, and the Translations of Brian Friel” in Imperialism and Theatre (antho. ed. J. Ellen Gainor)
  • Melissa Sihra and Paul Murphy, “The Dreaming Body,” intro in The Dreaming Body: Contemporary Irish Theatre (anth. ed. Sihra and Murphy)
  • also from that anthology, Eamonn Jordan, “Urban Drama: Will Any Myth Do?”
  • also from that anthology, Paul Murphy, “Brian Friel’s Wonderful Tennessee, or What was Lost in Translations
  • Intro, chapter I “Theories of Reading: An End to Interpretation?” and chapter II “Response, Intention, and Motives for Interpretation” in Stories of Reading: Subjectivity and Literary Understanding by Michael Steig

Still with me? And because I had to have some down time, I read,

  • John Green’s An Abundance of Katherines

Booook....

Well, that was boring. My reasons for (inflicting) typing my book list for you:

  1. It makes me feel accomplished.
  2. I wanted to brag about said accomplishments.
  3. I need an annotated bibliography, so that was the first step of me getting some of the text out of my notebook and into my MacBook.
  4. If you ever want to write a paper about Brian Friel’s 1980 play Translations, about the subjectivity of text and/or standards of nationalism, or about Irish theater, I’ve just given you a nice little list of sources.
  5. SO OVERWHELMED, CAN THINK OF AUGHT ELSE… gurgle

But it’s all okay. I have my power song to keep me going.

The power of K'naan, that is...

Hmmm. Perhaps another list (you can’t escape!) is in order… a studying/pape-writing/watery-lentil-soup-making/being-on-Fall-Break playlist?