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One year more. It's going fast. Am I taking advantage of every opportunity? You betcha.

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Posts Tagged “work”

A Hard Day’s Work

So what if by 10 P.M. I’m too exhausted to keep my eyes open? So what if every muscle in my body aches with a soreness that has seeped into my bones? So what if, when taking off my shoes, I realize what it must smell like at a trash heap? I’ve had a hard day’s work.

In four days I’ve worked forty hours, and plan on having four more days like this. Oddly enough, it’s not as much as a problem as I might have expected. But here’s the way I see it: after four months of romping across Europe, I deserve some sort of back-wrenching, callus inducing labor. At the moment I’m working in houses, cleaning out the messes left by past residences before the new ones come in. This is the busy season.

I’m upset that no one tipped me off that money would be a concern starting with my collegiate career and continuing on through the rest of my life. I feel like that was a bit of worldly advice that would have served me better in kindergarten (who cares if A is for Apple?! U is for Unsubsidized Federal Loan and I need to know how I’m going to pay it of without losing my sanity). But what can I expect from a life that requires huge amounts of work to pay off what I’ve accrued?

Steer away the bad thoughts, have no fear, the way through is clear. In the solution is the resolution. Working all day, although overtly for pay, may in the end upend the notion of comfort, like Depends. Satisfaction depends on action just as the house well-used, although a fraction of the original cost, is infused with value of a different sort. So, umm, maybe my point on you is lost, but you should be entertained by this poem.

Being Super Interesting: The BSI Program

I mentioned in an earlier post that I had participated in the Butler Summer Institute, a chance for those particularly academic minded students to work closely with a professor on research for 9 weeks in the summer.

The program is fantastic because it is open not only to scientific research (about 20 students are involved in the sciences) but also to the humanities (10 spots total). This keeps the options nearly limitless–projects range from psychology to comparative literature analysis to the study of C. elegans (a worm, I think).

Some BSI students at the IMA! (too many acronyms...)

My project was peculiar: being a Creative Writing Major, I engaged in a creative project. For nine weeks I developed and wrote a science fiction novel. This may seem like a frivolous use of the program, but I was engaging in the literary discussion that exists through several works of science fiction, including the work of Mary Shelly, Phillip K. Dick, and H.G. Wells. I ended up with an 80 page draft of the first half of the novel. What this should tell you is that the program gives all sorts of students with ambitious ideas an avenue to pursue them.

 

The Midterms are Coming, the Midterms are Coming!

Study time! I just imagine Paul Revere riding through town with this shocking news. In the rush to get the prime study tables on campus, some people might stop and ponder why it’s so surprising to have tests at college (what’s up with that?) But most don’t stop to questions, since such distractions can result in getting to the library late and being stuck with the tables by the bathroom.

Ah, Irwin LIbrary. How you consume my days.

Midterms here at Butler are scattered around Fall Break, some before and some after. As an English major, my midterm tests are very limited. I only had one leading up to this fall break. My midterm papers are much more prolific. Three total, due after break.

That’s one way I know Butler is doing its job. Throughout the entire semester, you work hard. It’s almost non-stop, slowly building first to midterms, and then a bigger push to finals. When winter break and summer hit, I always am left with nothing to do. I’m so busy at Butler I don’t even realize how much growth and education is going on!

Work: Goes Down Smooth

Smoothies! Fruit blends and health supplements and–goodness me!–wheat grass shots! What could be more college or hip than these? Well I’ll tell you. Nothing. If you’re ever on campus, be sure to make your way over to the Zia Juice Bar in the HRC.

As inviting as it is delicious. Yum.

This is a great example of a campus job that students can hold part-time. I work two shifts every week, bringing in around 9 hours, excepting the occasions in which I need to cover another workers shift or have one of my own covered.

It is a truly beneficial job, both for myself who on the downtimes gets a chance to work on homework, as well as for those who have finished working out and need that protein boost to get them through their day, or a healthy choice over the fast food alternatives. And if anyone’s wondering why there are better alternatives than fast food, I highly recommend this informative documentary.

Study Central

For a campus with a relatively small number of students, it can be surprisingly difficult to find a good study space away from one’s room. We can chalk this up to Butler’s studious and dedicated body of burgeoning scholars. For those of you wondering why I needed to study away from my room, it’s because there’s absolutely nothing worse than studying feet away from a bed. I have learned this through many a study-time turned nap-time.

Look! Over yonder! The Butler Observatory.

Over the summer I happened upon a wonderful study room in the recently renovated Pharmacy Building that was both well equipped and had a fantastic view, a prime panorama of the Butler Observatory. Getting here early in the morning was a struggle, but once I was up, this room helped me focus more than any amount of caffeine could.

The comfiest chairs you'll ever sit in. I guarantee it.

 

 

 

The reason I was on campus over the summer was for BSI, or the Butler Summer Institute. This is a chance for the scholarly and self-driven students of Butler’s campus to engage in research over the summer with a professor . Needless to say, I saw more fluorescent rays this summer than I did sun rays.